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Worker crushed to death by slab of concrete at constructon site at Ebisu Station

40 Comments

A construction worker died after he was crushed by a slab of concrete weighing 3.8 tons that fell on him at a construction site at Tokyo Metro’s Ebisu Station on Wednesday night.

Tokyo Metro released a statement Thursday saying that the man, in his 30s, was working on an escalator installation on the first floor of Ebisu subway station when the accident happened at 11:30 p.m. He was taken to the hospital but pronounced dead shortly after.

Meanwhile, Fuji TV reported Thursday that police are factoring in professional negligence as a possible cause of the accident.

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40 Comments
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Man that sucks. You get up, go to work, never know what the day will bring. RIP dude.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Sympathies to his family. I use this station and walk pass the construction everyday. Will always feel uneasy from now I think.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Wow RIP, was he standing under the crane? I would like to know more details?

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You can only hope that it whacked him on the head and he didn't know what hit him.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

whoah... what a poor guy.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Poor man. In his 30s - wife and family left behind?

Horrible thing to happen. So what caused the slab of concrete to fall?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The vernacular press is reporting that the police are looking at it as a possible case of 'professional negligence resulting in death' on the part of the construction company.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

cleo: I can almost guarantee it was professional negligence. These guys gather at night and try to cram so much into a small space in a short time I'm amazed, though extremely glad, this doesn't happen more often.

The poor guy... what an awful way to go.

"He was taken to the hospital but pronounced dead shortly after."

It still baffles me that only doctors are allowed to pronounce a person dead. Japan needs REAL paramedics -- not just people who ride in the ambulance with you and hold your hand. The guy was crushed to death by a nearly 4 tonne slab -- I think it probably could have been called at the scene.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

SmithingJapan.

Yes, an EMT can call it but it still takes certified doctor to sign the death certificate and this is the criteria. Unless you are telling us that an EMT overseas can sign a "Death Certificate".

1 ( +2 / -1 )

RIP, poor guy.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I just hope he went out quickly, not too much pain, because my dad used to do this kind of work back in the USA and, he almost got killed a couple of times on the construction sites, cave ins, things falling, loosing your balance on a skyscraper etc..not like in the cartoons, where you just bounce back, it happens more than we know. Usually in real life we do not just bounce back from these kind of accidents. RIP construction worker out in Ebisu.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

smithinjapan - of course there are paramedics and emergency response teams in Japan. Their job is the same as everywhere in the civilized world... Sometimes the victim LOOKS like being already dead at arrival in the emergency sections, and they miraculously manage to revive them and they survive thanks to the effort of these teams. On the way to the hospital usually the efforts to resuscitate are still ongoing, and most of the time, even if it looks futile, these efforts will continue for a while (usually until the hospital room is reached and the final decision can be made).

That's why most of the time you will see victims pronounced dead at the hospital.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I forgot the RIP to this guy - tough way to go.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

it is not reported on this site, but yesterday another horrible working accident happened: two workers fell into a hydrochloric acid tank where they suffered the most agonizing death imaginable. is it a coincidence, or the working-related accidents are on the raise?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I feel so bad for this guy and his family. What a horrible way to go.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

RIP poor fella.

yesterday another horrible working accident happened: two workers fell into a hydrochloric acid tank where they suffered the most agonizing death imaginable

That's bloody awful, probably the worst way to go as you say. Industrial accidents happen everywhere - but yes, it seems Japanese "safety standards" are slipping rather alarmingly. Don't know if the legislation is just weak here regarding OHS, or possibly companies just don't bother enforcing rules? Just glad I don't work in manual labour...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Must have been a gruesome scene. Probably not much left of him under 3.8 tons of concrete.

1 ( +2 / -2 )

No words... Other than RIP.

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So what caused the slab of concrete to fall?

Probably something to do with gravity.

3 ( +6 / -2 )

ebisen: "of course there are paramedics and emergency response teams in Japan. Their job is the same as everywhere in the civilized world"

'Paramedics' here have only a limited amount they can do, whereas in other nations they are almost like doctors themselves. As far as I know they are not allowed to pronounce them dead on the scene here... which is why you ALWAYS here, "taken to the hospital but pronounced dead on arrival". They are now trained to use AEDs, I believe, and of course must know CPR, but beyond that there's not a lot they can do besides administer a drip or something. Are you telling me they did not know the guy was dead under a 3.8 tonne piece of concrete? There have been a number of articles on this in the past. Just searched the archives, but alas, whenever you click on a file the "file cannot be found". Here's one article, though, stating how far behind their counterparts Japanese paramedics are, since you deny it (they still operate mostly under 1948 laws!):

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/shukan-st/english_news/editorial/2006/ed20060414.htm

So, what was that you were saying?

Anyway, not that they could have helped this guy one iota... I just think it's weird that they are not allowed to pronounce someone dead based on archaic laws.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

quite often I hear people say 'Paramedic' in Japan is nothing more than a taxi driver with a helmet.

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As Okinawamike says: RIP dude.

@ebisen: of course there are paramedics and emergency response teams in Japan. Their job is the same as everywhere in the civilized world... Sometimes the victim LOOKS like being already dead at arrival in the emergency sections, and they miraculously manage to revive them and they survive thanks to the effort of these teams. On the way to the hospital usually the efforts to resuscitate are still ongoing, and most of the time, even if it looks futile, these efforts will continue for a while (usually until the hospital room is reached and the final decision can be made).

You are kidding, right? "Paramedics" in Japan are famous for their lack of skill. Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe they are not even allowed to insert an IV?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

You are correct Saru-au! They are also called sardine cans with a siren and a pretty red twirling light. America has real EMT and state of the art ambulances. Here has shiny junk. Looks good on the outside but nothing on the inside.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Nicky: "You are kidding, right? "Paramedics" in Japan are famous for their lack of skill. Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe they are not even allowed to insert an IV?"

Exactly what I was saying earlier! Check out the link I left above.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Sincere condolences to his family, workmates and friends. RIP

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I hope his family is compensated

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Rest in peace...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How did they take him to a hospital, he must have been flat like as a stamp on a letter after been hit my that?

RIP!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How did they take him to a hospital, he must have been flat like as a stamp on a letter after been hit my that?

It didn't say that he was completely engulfed by the slab of concrete, just that it fell on him.

Perhaps his torso and head were OK.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@smithinjapan

ebisen: "of course there are paramedics and emergency response teams in Japan. Their job is the same as everywhere in the civilized world"

'Paramedics' here have only a limited amount they can do, whereas in other nations they are almost like doctors themselves. As far as I know they are not allowed to pronounce them dead on the scene here... which is why you ALWAYS here, "taken to the hospital but pronounced dead on arrival". They are now trained to use AEDs, I believe, and of course must know CPR, but beyond that there's not a lot they can do besides administer a drip or something. Are you telling me they did not know the guy was dead under a 3.8 tonne piece of concrete? There have been a number of articles on this in the past. Just searched the archives, but alas, whenever you click on a file the "file cannot be found". Here's one article, though, stating how far behind their counterparts Japanese paramedics are, since you deny it (they still operate mostly under 1948 laws!):

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/shukan-st/english_news/editorial/2006/ed20060414.htm

So, what was that you were saying?

Anyway, not that they could have helped this guy one iota... I just think it's weird that they are not allowed to pronounce someone dead based on archaic laws.

I have to admit that in my 30 years born and raised here, what Smithinjapan stated is correct. EMT in Japan is NOT like other developed countries. Here is more like a taxi with flashing lights. There is actually a high percent of people dying in route to the hospital because they couldn't keep them alive with the little resources the have available and extreme lack of skill.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Rest in Peace fellow, may your family find comfort in their time of need. Says a prayer for the deceased and his family and friends.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Rest in Peace fella (-_-)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What a terrible thing to happen may he RIP.

My sympathy to his friends and family.

Why though are the paramedics not very skilled? It seems strange that they are not better trained.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Cant get the picture out of my head and always in slow motion. RIP

0 ( +0 / -0 )

oh man, i go by there everyday. yesterday, it looked as if nothing happened-work as usual.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Company CEO will bow for 3 seconds and apologize. Company CEO will resign or commit suicide. Company will change it's name. Business as usual.
-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Ebisen.Your comment is incorrect.Japan does not have Paramedics.Ambulance drivers are no more qualified than Taxi Drivers in Japan.Sorry to say.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@smithinjapan

Anyway, not that they could have helped this guy one iota...

Then why bring up paramedics in Japan then?

Somebody not sit next to you on the train again?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I've ridden in an ambulance while living in Japan. They seemed okay to me at the time.

I did get an incorrect diagnosis from an ambulance driver back home. Everyone makes mistakes I guess. By coincidence, it was a Japanese immigrant who told me the right thing.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

ReformedBasher: "Then why bring up paramedics in Japan then?"

Because they should be able to pronounce them dead on the scene as they can in other developed nations, no? I was then contradicted by ebisen, where I proved her wrong.

"Somebody not sit next to you on the train again?"

You may crave and/or need the attention, I do not. I quite like it when the trains are not crowded and I have a bit of room next to me.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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