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Year-end jumbo lottery tickets go on sale with Y1 bil up for grabs

19 Comments

Year-end jumbo lottery tickets went on sale across Japan Monday, drawing long lines at sales booths. One billion yen in prize money is up for grabs, with the top prize being 700 million yen.

As usual, the biggest line was at Tokyo’s Nishi-Ginza where more than 700 people were already waiting when the booth opened at 8:30 a.m. Throughout the day, the waiting time at the booth was 90 minutes.

The Nishi-Ginza booth is popular because it has sold a number of winning tickets in the past.

The first person in line at the Nisei-Ginza booth was a 37-year-old man from Ishioka in Ibaraki Prefecture. He said he had arrived on Sunday morning. He bought 60 tickets and said if he wins the big money, he will donate most of it to help the recovery effort in the Tohoku region.

Tickets for a Jumbo Mini Lottery also went on sale, with 70 million yen in prize money.

Lottery tickets, which cost 300 yen, will be sold through Dec 22 and winning numbers will be announced on Dec 31.

For details on the prize money allocation, click here.

© Japan Today

©2018 GPlusMedia Inc.

19 Comments
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A booth that has sold a number of winning tickets in the past is statistically less likely to sell more winning tickets in the future. But I guess lottery tickets never where aimed at the statistically minded....

That said, we will be buying 3 tickets.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

@PerformingMonkey

I believe that this is correct and maybe useful:

Each draw is independent of past draws, so a ticket that is bought at a booth that sold a winning ticket in the past has exactly the same probability of winning as a ticket that is bought at a different booth.

Booths that have sold winning tickets in the past attract more people, so they sell more tickets, thus increasing the chance of a winning ticket being sold there again. People think they increase their own chances by going to crowded booths, but they actually increase the chances of the booth.

People have only one way to increase their own chances of winning: buy more tickets, regardless of the booth.

15 ( +15 / -0 )

Well said sircosti

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Exactly. If the chances of winning could be expanded by the location, timing etc of the purchase, then it would not be a random draw and the whole exercise would be unfair and pointless.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Hmmm. 08:30 on a Monday morning. That’s a big part of 700 people arriving late for work, except those that work other timings or took part of the day off!!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

If certain booths get more winning tickets then obviously it’s not as random as it’s supoosed to be. Isn’t a lonely booth in some small town supposed to possibly have the winning numbers too?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Got to be in it to win it. Good luck everyone

3 ( +3 / -0 )

1 billion yen, what a joke. The Lottery in Japan is an insult to intelligence. Where as you have in the State of California the Lottery starts at 1 billion yen and grows each drawing not won and has been in the 500 to 1000 billion yen. and it only costs 100 yen per ticket.

But as we say in the states: Someone is going to win and it is not you!

You also have a better chance of getting hit by lightening 2 times than winning the lottery.

Its just another scam to get your money from you

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Unfortunately, the chances of winning are so minute that I'll be enjoying my cash in other ways.....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory springs to mind here... buying one ticket gives you hope for a change in your Life style that you yourself can't make. This is forever going to be the allure of such big ticket Lotteries, and which is why people feel drawn to buying tickets. If you don't buy one, then your chances of winning are absolutely "zero", but if you buy one... then you have at least hope, no matter how infinitesimally small. I'd go with the latter, and purchase just one ticket.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

mugs game.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Yawn....Wake me up when its 10 billion yen.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I don't play, but I do engage in the fantasy. If I won, I wouldn't even tell my wife. She would figure it out though, when our lifestyle suddenly started getting better even though our jobs were the same.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Can foreign residents play?  The UK lotto states that you must be a resident. So even expats can't play that game.

Wouldn't like to win it only to be told otherwise.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Can foreign residents play?

You have to be physically in Japan to buy the tickets (from one of the booths) and if you win you have to be in Japan to claim your prize; from the booth if it's a small one, from a branch of Mizuho Bank if it's a big win. You need to provide proof of identity, but I can't see any reference anywhere to proof of residence (except that 'proof of identity' can be a utilities bill showing your address, if your main ID (medical insurance card, etc) doesn't have a photo).

1 billion yen, what a joke. The Lottery in Japan is an insult to intelligence. Where as you have in the State of California the Lottery starts at 1 billion yen and grows each drawing not won and has been in the 500 to 1000 billion yen. and it only costs 100 yen per ticket.

You mean there's only one jackpot ticket, and if the number doesn't come up, nobody wins till next time? And somehow that's better than over 45,000 guaranteed prizes of ¥100,000 and over including 25 chances at ¥700 million? Maybe your idea of a joke is different from mine.

(Disclaimer - I've never bought a lottery ticket, but if I did, I think a bigger (if still very small) chance of winning something would be a bigger incentive than a basically zero chance of winning more than I could ever possibly use in a lifetime.)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why on earth would you wait 90 minutes to buy a ticket that you can easily buy for at least another month? Sorry, I don't get it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That is allot of yen. I will give it a go. I know where I can buy a ticket right in front of my local Supa.

NO WAITING! I am there at the end of the day money in hand buying two tickets please. I would love to win. I would give some money to my church. Then I would buy a house. Send my kid to the best schools in Japan. Yep Golf and 2018 GTR NISMO and I and the wife living the good life...Ah....Nice day dream. Now back to reality and back to work. Life is good even if I do not win. But it would be nice.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I would love to win. I would give some money to my church. Then I would buy a house. Send my kid to the best schools in Japan. Yep Golf and 2018 GTR NISMO and I and the wife living the good life...Ah....Nice day dream.

You just zoned in on what lotteries are actually selling. Many people complain that they are selling an opportunity that you are pretty much guaranteed to lose. But the lottery companies are selling a hope, a daydream, the good feelings one gets thinking about 'what if...'.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Strangerland just nailed it. The hope...the dream...the what if...

That's why I played back in the UK. Never really believed I would win. Somewhere in the back of my head I thought the whole thing was rigged.

That was until a friend won.

Not a huuuuge win, but enough to retire on.

BTW...he didn't retire, but we lost contact on account of me moving to Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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