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Anti-Oi protest

49 Comments

Protesters carry effigies of Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda during a rally to protest the restart of the No. 3 reactor at the Oi nuclear power plant, in Tokyo on Sunday. The effigies read: "Resign, Noda!"

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The fukushima fallout is not yet over and the nuclear radiation hot spots are back with a vangence, resurfacing all over Tokyo. Greed for abnormal profits, lack of accountability and leadership is the main reason Japan will be reduced to a waste, inhabited by a populace in constant fear to be wiped off the world map! One only needs to look at the German example to know how renewables can make nuke electricity almost irrelevant.

5 ( +10 / -4 )

nuclear radiation hot spots are back with a vangence, resurfacing all over Tokyo

Some details please.

1 ( +8 / -6 )

Nice to see that Japan won't forget his lies and policy inconsistencies. Noda lies, blowup pigs fly, and people protest in the rain...

The photo in't as powerful as a few before it, but it's nice to see that people won't give up. Onniyama, did you get my email? or at least the facebook msg. We all have too much going on, i know... work, family, little emergencies

4 ( +5 / -0 )

Japan has to have the nuclear plants until they can build the next generation of global warming oil and natural gas power plants to run their modern economy on. Funny, but no one talks about the Kyoto protocol anymore...

-7 ( +2 / -10 )

We need this nuclear power. Thank you Mr. Noda for saving lives by listening to science and common sense. Finally some firm decision making by a Japanese leader.

-12 ( +6 / -17 )

Personally, I'd like to know more about the thought behind the man weaing the costume that seems to be a police clown carrying a pig.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

We need this nuclear power. Thank you Mr. Noda for saving lives by listening to science and common sense. Finally some firm decision making by a Japanese leader.

It saved lives?

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Japan has to have the nuclear plants until they can build the next generation of global warming oil and natural gas power plants to run their modern economy on. Funny, but no one talks about the Kyoto protocol anymore...

Renewable energy my friend.

7 ( +9 / -3 )

@Rick Kisa

One only needs to look at the German example to know how renewables can make nuke electricity almost irrelevant.

Are you the one who kept spamming that Germany saved itself by having a gazillion solar plannels and now is totally green?

@Thomas Anderson

Renewable energy my friend.

I think you've been spending too much time in the matrix. In the real world, renewable energy is not a viable alternative to nuclear energy. Wind depends on... well, wind; solar is more reliable but still very inefficient; geothermal seems to be a good alternative for Japan; wave generators have their quirks; etc. Maybe someday Japan will be able to get 30% of its juice from renewables, i hope so - but not yet.

So make sure security protocols are followed to the letter, that there are no money shortcuts, turn 'em back on and carry on living, while investigating better alternatives.

-8 ( +4 / -10 )

It saved lives?

How many people do you think would die from heat stroke in trains or public places without airconditioning? Do you think acid rain from coal power plants or smog from oil or gas plants is good for your health?

Renewable energy my friend.

where is it? does it work? is it practical? is it affordable? I mean, I fantasize about having sex with Mesa Kuroki, but it doesn't mean that I should concentrate my life and stop having sex with my wife until i reach that goal, does it?

-10 ( +4 / -12 )

How many people do you think would die from heat stroke in trains or public places without airconditioning? Do you think acid rain from coal power plants or smog from oil or gas plants is good for your health?

How can you actually read into the future? Are you a psychic?

I think you've been spending too much time in the matrix. In the real world, renewable energy is not a viable alternative to nuclear energy. Wind depends on... well, wind; solar is more reliable but still very inefficient; geothermal seems to be a good alternative for Japan; wave generators have their quirks; etc. Maybe someday Japan will be able to get 30% of its juice from renewables, i hope so - but not yet.

Okay, so Germany gets 30% of their energy from renewables, they are abandoning nuclear, yet at the same time reducing the CO2. Your turn?

3 ( +8 / -4 )

where is it? does it work? is it practical? is it affordable? I mean, I fantasize about having sex with Mesa Kuroki, but it doesn't mean that I should concentrate my life and stop having sex with my wife until i reach that goal, does it?

Look into Germany? 30% from renewables, abandoning nuclear, reducing CO2. Need I go on?

6 ( +10 / -4 )

It's completely deceiving to say that "Either we restart the reactors, or we'll have deaths from heat strokes!" We don't even know whether lack of nuclear plants will result in power shortages or not.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Vesperto - The Netherlands is 90% reliant on wind energy. New Zealand is 20% reliant on Geothermal energy. Please tell me what makes you think renewable energy is not viable. It is totally viable and many countries have proven it.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Look into Germany? 30% from renewable, abandoning nuclear, reducing CO2. Need I go on?

First of all, it's 20%, second, the problem with currently developed renewable energy sources is that they require massive land masses, which Japan doesn't have. Japan is an overpopulated island with lots of mountains.

Don't get me wrong, I am all for renewable energy, but you have to be realistic. It won't be switched on overnight. For now, I can only see a deal with government, electric companies and home owners, so all privately owned homes are equipped with solar panels on their roofs and sell their excess power back... if this is done in large scale, some of the energy deficit may be covered.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Wind depends on... well, wind; solar is more reliable but still very inefficient; geothermal seems to be a good alternative for Japan; wave generators have their quirks; etc. Maybe someday Japan will be able to get 30% of its juice from renewables, i hope so - but not yet. So make sure security protocols are followed to the letter, that there are no money shortcuts, turn 'em back on and carry on living, while investigating better alternatives

Finally, some common sense around here...

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Security protocols? That is exactly the problem! There has been to much BS and to many information coverups for anybody to have any confidence that the J-Gov, TEPCO, KEPCO and the COs are abiding by the protocols or just spitballing in an attempt to ease public pressure. I tend to lean towards the latter.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

No reactors should have been started before the new atomic safety agency is up and running. That will only start to function in September. It needs to review the data from the reactor stress tests and also review the safety standards of every reactor in the country.

Another very important point would be evacuation plans in all areas within 30 km from an atomic plant.

Prior to the 3/11 nuclear disaster, at the Oi plant there were no emergency backup generators. KEPCO have bought in generator trucks which would roll over in a powerful earthquake. At all the KEPCO atomic plants there are no offsite earthquake and radiation proof control centers. At the Oi plant, KEPCO is using a previous disused building because it will take 5 years to build a proper one.

Today, the people living around the Oi plant seem unclear what they would have to do in the event of an emergency evacuation. They have been told not to use their cars because it would quickly block up the road system which would also mean emergency services may not be able to reach the plant, which only has a single access road anyway.

If the country wants to start reactors, the government should start the safest, which does not include the Oi plant. A team of 9 bipartisan lawmakers, led by ex-PM Kan, ranked the safety of every reactor in the country. Out of the bottom 10, 5 are owned by KEPCO including rectors 1&2 at the Oi plant, which are not the ones being started. They are No3&4.

12 ( +13 / -2 )

@Disillusioned

The Netherlands is 90% reliant on wind energy. New Zealand is 20% reliant on Geothermal energy. Please tell me what makes you think renewable energy is not viable. It is totally viable and many countries have proven it.

The Netherlands is a windy small country (compared to Japan in terms or energy requirements). I mentioned geothermal would be a good bet for Japan. Neither country is New Zealand.

They're not viable because the technology is not fully developed yet, it's very expensive, it's unreliable (i.e. depending on external uncontrollable factors like wind and sun), it's mostly subsidized by governments and the energy these technologies produce is is small quantities per device.

They might become more economically viable in the future, probably solar will advance the most, but for the time being there's a lot of work to be done. Besides, each country has it's specifics, which may or may not adapt to each type of renewable (which makes most country comparisons moot unless you'd like to suggest hydro-electrics in near-dry lands).

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

First of all, it's 20%, second, the problem with currently developed renewable energy sources is that they require massive land masses, which Japan doesn't have. Japan is an overpopulated island with lots of mountains.

Even then, Germany has produced 50% of their electricity demands from solar alone at some point in May. Germany has increased solar energy production by 40% since last year. That means solar energy is almost doubling every two years.

And I'm not sure that "they require massive land masses" is a legitimate argument anymore... since there are plenty of places to place solar panels and wind farms. Even then, it just means that we'll need to get more creative.

It won't be switched on overnight.

Obviously not, but is switching on nuclear really a good idea? We can't discount that nuclear plants may melt down. I'd say conserving energy is a wiser and more "realistic" choice. And is there really proof that lack of nuclear energy will result in shortages? The data may show otherwise.

Amongst all the people posting comments on this site, you sir are the last person who should be preaching to others about knowing facts before posting and looking foolish. I have not read one well-informed, much less intelligent, comment from you. Ever.

Says you... I'm not sure what you have exactly contributed. Good to know that there are many pro-nuclear folks around this time on this thread.

1 ( +4 / -2 )

No reactors should have been started before the new atomic safety agency is up and running.

+1

3 ( +3 / -1 )

Again, another ill-informed statement. I'm absolutely not pro-nuclear. If you read any of my comments on the subject you might

Oh, well I didn't notice because quite frankly, I don't really care as much as you care about my posts, lol. Btw I'm not necessarily saying that you are pro-nuclear, but I'm gathering from the amount of thumb ups. See, it's not all about you.

(and I say might because I seriously doubt your capacity for logical reasoning)

What about my logical reasoning?

However, as against it as I am, I am also trying to be objective about the whole issue

What exactly are you attempting to be objective about? Again you didn't really state anything, at best you merely agreed with another poster.

Logically, it would take some time to ween the country off nuclear power and establish the infrastructure and administrative bodies to supply sufficient levels of power from alternative energy sources.

And I'm saying that we should try to conserve energy first for the time being. And where is the proof that lack of nuclear will result in shortages? I think that's the question that we should be asking.

Some sources say that lack of nuclear will result in mass blackouts, an economic meltdown, many deaths from heatstroke, chaos and confusion, etc, etc. And then some other sources say that we can absolutely go through summer without nuclear energy.

But what we can't ignore is the possibility of a melt down. So is restarting really a good idea?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

There are alternatives for energy, just no alternatives politicaly. Companies rule and the most with cash dictate the policies, change, forward planning appear to be an anathema in the current climate. Its comparable to holding a gun to your head because you can't find a sword, both will kill you but it's really regrettable in either case. The scare mongering from industries has offered no alternatives, but they are there. it's 2012 fossil fuels have had their day and are limited N-Power is cheep but has huge downsides that threaten the future. Ganbatte is well and good but where, who are proposing an alternative...the alternatives are there. Just need a leader with vision and an adversity to brown bags.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

The Netherlands is 90% reliant on wind energy. @Disillusioned i highly doubt that where did you get those figures from?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@t Thomas Anderson

It's completely deceiving to say that "Either we restart the reactors, or we'll have deaths from heat strokes!"

I agree, and unless the post has been deleted by the mods, where was that said? It must be somewhere up there because you've got it in quotes.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Disillusioned:

The Netherlands is 90% reliant on wind energy.

The Dutch have been trying to meet the EU-set target of producing 9% of total electricity from renewable sources.

You seem to have added one zero too many. LOL

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The effigies read: “Resign, Noda!”

So it was an anti-Noda protest, not anti-Oi protest.

What's with the Halloween outfits?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Star-vikingJUL. 02, 2012 - 07:13AM JST

Some details please.

Are yu from the grave? Rick kisa does not need to tell you that numerous hotsports are in Tokyo and the Fukushima nuclear radiation still goes on. Recently there was unprecedented spike of radiation at the plant due to faulty everthing!

VespertoJUL. 02, 2012 - 10:17AM JST

Are you the one who kept spamming that Germany saved itself by having a gazillion solar plannels and now is totally green?

It is not only Rick Kisa talking about germany. This is common knowledge and if Japan wants to learn, it can do so. Somebody mentioned that wind energy requires a lot of land, which is laughable. Netherlands depends on wind energy yet it is a very small country. How about turning the waste land near Fukushima into a renewable energy park by building wind mills?

-4 ( +4 / -9 )

It is not only Rick Kisa talking about germany. This is common knowledge and if Japan wants to learn, it can do so. Somebody mentioned that wind energy requires a lot of land, which is laughable. Netherlands depends on wind energy yet it is a very small country. How about turning the waste land near Fukushima into a renewable energy park by building wind mills?

What is laughable is someone saying the Netherlands depend 90% on wind power. Source for that, please? Yes, it's a small country, but it's not a farm that can have its own wind generator. It's some 16M people - how many generators would be required?

How many wind generators would be required to match the Fukushima reactors? What area do you think they'd occupy?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Netherlands depends on wind energy.

No they don't. I should know as I'm from there.

The Netherlands relies heavily on wind energy to reach the EU-set renewable energy target of 9%.

Wind Energy Capacity from 2008- to 2011 was 2070(MW), compared to 10(MW) for Green gas, 160(MW) for waste incineration, and 160(MW) for biomass burning.

In short, that's 75% of all (only 9%) of the Netherland's nenewable energy sources.

http://www.erec.org/fileadmin/erec_docs/Projcet_Documents/RES2020/NETHERLANDS_RES_Policy_Review__09_Final.pdf

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Anyway, I'm not sure if the Oi restarts will be stopped now. Probably not. I find it kind of... interesting that while nuclear has supposedly provided for 30% of Japan's electricity demands, only Oi reactors are getting restarted and we're doing fine.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Okay, that's a weird photo... Japanese protesters with English banners, and the guy closest to the camera with a London Met Police helmet, diced wristband and carrying an inflatable pig.

Saw a video of the protests yesterday with a woman armed with a megaphone wandering about in front of the police, who just stood there, although one of them seemed to pull her out of the way of a passing car.

Anyway, good photo... if a little weird.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

japan123Jul. 02, 2012 - 01:41PM JST

"Some details please".

Are yu from the grave? Rick kisa does not need to tell you that numerous hotsports are in Tokyo and the Fukushima nuclear radiation still goes on. Recently there was unprecedented spike of radiation at the plant due to faulty everthing!

Really? Rick Kisa said the hotspots were back with a vengeance. I've heard no news on that - or the unprecedented spike at Fukushima Dai-ichi.

You really need to provide some more information to back up your claims.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

zichiJul. 02, 2012 - 11:08AM JST

Prior to the 3/11 nuclear disaster, at the Oi plant there were no emergency backup generators. KEPCO have bought in generator trucks which would roll over in a powerful earthquake. At all the KEPCO atomic plants there are no offsite earthquake and radiation proof control centers. At the Oi plant, KEPCO is using a previous disused building because it will take 5 years to build a proper one.

Are you talking about the diesel back-ups, or mobile back-ups?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Odd, just when I found the source, all of the "conspiracy" comments magically vanished... well, here it is: http://www.tanteifile1.com/diary/2012/06/23_02/

For those of you who can't read, some of these people are actually getting paid to go and protest. Not exactly what I call committed protestors there.. Though I can only say for sure the ones at Oi gates.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

How could a sane being look at the exclusion zone, just over a year still going with no end in sight, and say "yeah, we need more of that....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Most heat generated by Japan's nuclear power plants goes into the ocean where it contributes to global warming. By the way, a 92.8% reduction in nuclear power resulted in a 14% reduction in electricity supply. http://www.iea.org/stats/surveys/mes.pdf#search='IEA%20January%202012'

Japan can save that much by turning off half the vending machines (whose purpose is to reduce real estate taxes, not sell drinks).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m6jfo3ODlT1qzaisbo1_1280.jpg

Protestors taking the duct tape off of the outlet and stealing electricity. This, ladies and gentlemen, is the quality of these so-called protesters.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

nigelboyJul. 02, 2012 - 11:55PM JST

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m6jfo3ODlT1qzaisbo1_1280.jpg

Protestors taking the duct tape off of the outlet and stealing electricity. This, ladies and gentlemen, is the quality of these so-called protesters.

Anti-nuclear protesters, now powered in part by nuclear!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

warnerbroJul. 02, 2012 - 11:35PM JST

Most heat generated by Japan's nuclear power plants goes into the ocean where it contributes to global warming.

Sure... the protesters using more energy to protest also contributes to global warming. Even more so, every second that nuclear plants aren't turned on, the coal, gas, and oil generation facilities produce enough CO2 to trap a hundred times more energy than fukushima let off in the last year.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

No Nuclear Power!...No Radioactive fallout!...Stop destroying beautiful Japan!...I have been saving my money, and learning to speak japanese. I want to travel and teach, and really get to see and feel Japan. I am a General Contractor and Commercial Diver, and quite the Gormet Cook, and Musician....my friend's call me the walking jukebox. I play piano, guitar, drums etc....But I am worrried that Japan has radioactive fallout every where. How can I plan my travel's through Japan, when every where I read the very people of Japan are protesting againt's these Power Plants? I don't know when would be a good time. But I have grown to love Japan just from all I've seen and read. My trip is postponed until I read it's safe.....How long should I wait? Sushi loving America Native of Wyandotte Nation of Oklahoma wants to know?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Just watched a sobering video documentary on the fight within the US to get 20-yr extensions on Indian Point NY and other aging, rusting reactors. If Japan can muster so many people to protest against restarting OI, how much more should people in the US be protesting against what is happening there, with old reactors almost identical to the ones at Fukushima. N Americans, sit up, observe this movement in Japan and make the connection!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

the more i read the more i'm convinced, japan is the most western-eastern country ever to exist. It's a unique blend of about everything that has still like its own identity no one can really fathom. I am fascinated (but that happened to me before) ... What's this thing, the tsunami did it, politicians are never honest, if you build nuclear plants, you build them further from the shore, dig a canal if need be if you need the cooling water to be close, earthquakes seem to have been part of japan's history like forever, tsunamis never washed over the entire island afaik. Not my place, i know that, i just, don't deal in anything but reality, call me an autist if that makes you feel comfortable i have no problem with it and i know a few people who need to. I'm against nuclear power unless for (aforementioned reasons) specially on an island where waves and wind can get you so much but like i said, despite it not being my place, not speaking has never been my greatest quality. That's why i try to leave most things in the middle while insulting no one who never insulted me and so i get lost in my own words by the time i'm done

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Using nuclear power is like going out in the sun too much, you may feel good about your HEALTHY sun tan now, but in the future, guess what, you may get premature wrinkles and if you are really unlucky, skin cancer, so back to nuclear power, Japan thought it could cut corners into become a rich country, now look at the mess we have in Fukushima, kind of a NO GO ZONE for what??? The next 20 or 40 thousand years.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Elbuda MexicanoJul. 03, 2012 - 02:44AM JST

The next 20 or 40 thousand years.

No, nuclear reactor waste (fallout is a portion of it, but mainly only the lighter stuff that decays quickly) loses 99.9% of it's radiation within 200-600 years (depending on type of reactor). After that it's actually less radioactive than the surrounding rock in most cases, so while the radiation continues for a long time, it's actually much less radioactive than the surroundings.

Most of that "no go" zone is perfectly safe and almost all is less radioactive than most of europe.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

nigelboy

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m6jfo3ODlT1qzaisbo1_1280.jpg Protestors taking the duct tape off of the outlet and stealing electricity. This, ladies and gentlemen, is the quality of these so-called protesters.

Attacking (some of) the protesters, not the argument. Classy.

basroil

Sure... the protesters using more energy to protest also contributes to global warming. Even more so, every second that nuclear plants aren't turned on, the coal, gas, and oil generation facilities produce enough CO2 to trap a hundred times more energy than fukushima let off in the last year.

erm, it was nuclear that has failed to deliver the promised stable and clean energy in the first place. We should have invested in renewables instead. Nuclear is a waste of time and money.

No, nuclear reactor waste (fallout is a portion of it, but mainly only the lighter stuff that decays quickly) loses 99.9% of it's radiation within 200-600 years (depending on type of reactor).

lol, as if 200-600 years is a realistic time frame. I guess nobody who is responsible now will be alive then, so they don't have to take any responsibility.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

basroil

Most of that "no go" zone is perfectly safe and almost all is less radioactive than most of europe.

Do you know of any reasons why the gov't, NSC, NISA, TEPCO, MEXT, Ministry of Science, IAEA, would all disagree with that statement? Do you think they are all just plain wrong?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Attacking (some of) the protesters, not the argument. Classy.

I could very well post a link where they show the protestors parents using their kids as a human shield against the police some of them are holding a sign that saids "save the children". Is that "classy" enough for ya?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Oh. I forgot to mention that this took place in front of the main gate at Oi plant.

If you can't see the hypocricy, then there is no point in arguing.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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