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Civil unrest

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Protesters holding placards shouts slogans at a rally against Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's push to expand Japan's military role while police officers stand guard in front of Abe's official residence in Tokyo on Monday. The yellow placards read, "We oppose the right to collective self-defense" and "No cabinet approval."

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Peacefully demonstrating in front of the PM's official residence is not "civil unrest".

24 ( +24 / -1 )

Whilst i applaud them for coming out to the street , just like the Fukushima anti nuclear protests , as long as the protesters obediently and orderly follow all the instructions given to them by the authorities , ie.. Don't stand here, keep this pavement / road clear, don,t cause any inconvenience to anyone or anything...the government will only ever pay them lip service and do what it wants anyway. An unfortunate fact of the matter is until they block a few roads and do cause a bit of " inconvenience" the govt. will not pay any attention to their opinions.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Too bad they didn't come out like this at the last election and actually vote then there may not have been any problem in the first place.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

In the face of what is essentially a coup d'etat - this is probably too civil.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

This type of situation is not considered a civil unrest or civil disorder or civil strife. It could be a civil disturbance which is a symptom of, and a form of protest. However it appears to be a peaceful assembly or probably just a peaceful protest.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

The headline of this article should be.......

"Japanese Government Fails to Implement Democratic Principles"

Reform Article 9?

Put it to the Japanese people in a referendum!

11 ( +11 / -0 )

They have the right to voice their opinions.

Now, if they could have won at the polls Prime Minister Abe wouldn't be Prime Minister today.

Civil unrest, really? This was a protest by a few people in a city of 13 million and not a case of civil unrest. Looks like someone at Japan Today is trying to make a splash.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

A man's first duty in true democratic society is that he is able to think and express for himself.

That's what count here.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

JoeBigs: If someone besides Abe was voted in, that doesn't guarantee we wouldn't be facing this same issue today. Can you point to a single politician that is honest, who actions are always 100% for the people? 2nd. More sarcasm over the number of protesters again, (though you claimed not to care) Now the numbers have grown into the thousands, yet YOU call them a few. Do you know the definition of a few? Though I will agree with you, that this is NOT an example of civil unrest.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Historically, has there been any "peaceful" protest that resulted in politicians reversing their intentions ? Historically, has there been any debate resulting in debaters changing their minds ? The result is mostly getting more experience to think up more "reasons" for the next debate or "excuse" speeches.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Stuart haywardJul. 01, 2014 - 10:12AM JST JoeBigs: If someone besides Abe was voted in, that doesn't guarantee we wouldn't be facing this same issue today. Can you point to a single politician that is honest, who actions are always 100% for the people? 2nd. More sarcasm over the number of protesters again, (though you claimed not to care) Now the numbers have grown into the thousands, yet YOU call them a few. Do you know the definition of a few? Though I will agree with you, that this is NOT an example of civil unrest.

1st, 2nd and 3rd, if the DPJ were the majority they wouldn't try and change the Constitution. Those who win power outright use it, those that lose power always try and wrestle it back. Could you point out when I said that I believed politicians were honest? I won't hold my breath for any honest reply.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Proof yet again (and again and again) that Japanese are not quite the mindless sheeple afraid to demonstrate and speak out in public, against the grain.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

RecklessJul. 01, 2014 - 09:14AM JST

Too bad they didn't come out like this at the last election and actually vote then there may not have been any problem in the first place.

Agree. Some in this photo probably voted for Abe.

Abe did not lie saying, " we will take our country back". It was written all over on his campaign ads and people still voted for him. Japanese need to sleep on bed they made.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Ultimately completely pointless.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

@globalwatcher,

Exactly. People knew his policies that he was planning this move. It should not come as a shock, and if there were issues then they should have voted for the DPJ candidates in the mid-term elections.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Proof yet again (and again and again) that Japanese are not quite the mindless sheeple afraid to demonstrate and speak out in public, against the grain.

Proof that a very small percentage of the people aren't sheeple afraid to demonstrate. The overwhelmingly huge majority are sheep though.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It's great to see so many older people in the crowd.

It might also be worth mentioning to anyone here who is not a citizen or permanent resident, if you do take part in a political protest that tries to influence the government, it can be grounds for not renewing your visa at the next renewal period. The courts have confirmed that this is the case. Just something to keep in mind in the coming years if we keep heading in this direction.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

JoeBigs: Again we disagree, I believe ALL politicians are corrupt or corrupted on their path to success. They all our influenced by special interest rather than the interest of the people. Sadly, it does not matter what party they're from, wether it's here or any other country. For example, I voted for Obama because of his anti-war, spying, environmental stances and promises, yet he has gone the opposite direction in every issue. They might speak differently but their actions our almost the same. 2nd. There you go again, your inability to read my comments without twisting or deflecting it. I NEVER SAID that YOU believed that politicians were honest, I ASKED, if YOU could point out an honest politician who actions were always 100% for the people? Also you never answered if you know the difference between a few or thousands? Sarcasm back at you but your comment leads me to believe you don't no the difference.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Sorry guys, the numbers are too low. A million turnout is the magic number for any refusal on this bill I'm afraid

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@joebiggs

if the DPJ were the majority they wouldn't try and change the Constitution.

Noda tried to back in June 2012. Interestingly, his collective self defence proposal and Abe's proposal are nearly identical. The only difference is Abe has managed to stick around long enough to get a shot at implementing it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Interestingly, his collective self defence proposal and Abe's proposal are nearly identical.

That's because their parties are nearly identical. Almost nothing to differentiate them.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

yokattaJul. 01, 2014 - 01:06PM JST Sorry guys, the numbers are too low. A million turnout is the magic number for any refusal on this bill I'm afraid

I think they don't need to get that high, if the opposition can muster at least a hundred thousand protesters in the streets they will have a real chance. But, with so few turning out at their protest they don't stand a chance. Dang-it, "FEW" rears it's ugly head again! If the anti-revisionist want to get noticed they best do better. Perfect example was the anti-nuclear protest, they rallied around 100,000 marchers in Tokyo and raised some eyebrows.

hokkaidoguyJul. 01, 2014 - 01:39PM JST Noda tried to back in June 2012. Interestingly, his collective self defence proposal and Abe's proposal are nearly identical. The only difference is Abe has managed to stick around long enough to get a shot at implementing it.

Correct me if I am wrong, but wasn't the DPJ against it before they were for it? (talking 2007-2009)

StrangerlandJul. 01, 2014 - 03:20PM JST That's because their parties are nearly identical. Almost nothing to differentiate them.

At least with Prime Minister Abe and the LDP you get what you paid for.

Stuart haywardJul. 01, 2014 - 12:38PM JST JoeBigs: Again we disagree, I believe ALL politicians are corrupt or corrupted on their path to success. They all our influenced by special interest rather than the interest of the people.

I am glad you saw that I have never claimed that politicians were honest. You see we don't disagree, all politicians are dishonest as snake oil salesmen. Before you ask me to show you what "dishonest as snake oil salesmen" means, let me beat you to the punch. Snake oil salesmen were charlatans who traveled around selling fake meds. Oh boy, when I said "beat to the punch" I wasn't referring to a physical punch it's another idiom which implies ,"to do something before someone else. And a "charlatan" is swindler or someone who cheats others out of something. Meds a military slang short for medicine or medication.

Hope that covered all your future questions, if I missed something just ask. Always happy to help those in need.

Stuart haywardJul. 01, 2014 - 12:38PM JST Also you never answered if you know the difference between a few or thousands? Sarcasm back at you but your comment leads me to believe you don't no the difference.

Look up "a Few" and be amazed how many uses it has.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Someone should be handing out translated copies of Thoreau's On the Duty of Civil Disobedience.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

JoeBigs: 100,000 anti nuclear protesters (in a city that's extremely hard to gather in those numbers) yet the government still totally egnored those citizens, Abe version of democracy. FEW Definition, A small number of.. (One being one, two being a couple and three being a few) if you had said a few thoudsand, you would have been correct. And yes, I do have another question for you. You claim be an expert on comunism, because you were born in a comunist country, I'm curious of which one, since you're ashamed to mention it. You also clamed to have served in the US military, care to elaborate?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Stuart haywardJul. 02, 2014 - 08:24PM JST JoeBigs: 100,000 anti nuclear protesters (in a city that's extremely hard to gather in those numbers) yet the government still totally egnored those citizens, Abe version of democracy. FEW Definition, A small number of.. (One being one, two being a couple and three being a few) if you had said a few thoudsand, you would have been correct. And yes, I do have another question for you. You claim be an expert on comunism, because you were born in a comunist country, I'm curious of which one, since you're ashamed to mention it. You also clamed to have served in the US military, care to elaborate.

After the anti-nuke protest how many power plants were started up again? If the protests didn't work all the reactors would be up and running today.

Your second question, or should I say your attempt to goad me. If you wanted to know all you had to do was just ask without the accusation. You see, no one has ever asked me, so I never said. Now, since you rarely answer any of my questions I think I'll turn this into a game. Yes, a game it shall be. You will have to guess which Communist nation I was born in. The clues are all there, all you have to do is put them together. You should be able to figure it out. But, here are a few more clues for you. My family immigrated to the States in 1967. Next, in Japan there are only a handful of us.

Let's us see if you can guess.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

After the anti-nuke protest how many power plants were started up again? If the protests didn't work all the reactors would be up and running today.

The shut down of all the reactors had nothing to do with any protests. It was a decision taken by the NRA that the reactors would first be stress tested and then the safety of the reactors and the nuclear power plants updated to meet the new guidelines issued by the NRA. Finally, all the power utilities must apply for an inspection to ensure those safety guidelines have been meet. I'm sure the government took notice of the protest, especially the previous one but I don't think it led to decision to shut down all the reactors which had also reached the end of the maintenance cycle? Cuba!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

zichiJul. 03, 2014 - 10:02AM JST The shut down of all the reactors had nothing to do with any protests. It was a decision taken by the NRA that the reactors would first be stress tested and then the safety of the reactors and the nuclear power plants updated to meet the new guidelines issued by the NRA. Finally, all the power utilities must apply for an inspection to ensure those safety guidelines have been meet. I'm sure the government took notice of the protest, especially the previous one but I don't think it led to decision to shut down all the reactors which had also reached the end of the maintenance cycle? Cuba!

Before the protests politicians were gungho for nuclear power, but after the protests politicians became silent. If the anti-revision crowd can muster more than a peep they stand a chance. But, if they continue only able to stuff a phone booth with their protesters their fight is futile.

When this fight reaches Japan's Supreme Court, the last nail will be hammered in and any hope of reversing what the Government wants to do will be dead. So, their only hope of winning is by mustering many more protesters than they have been.

Let's see if Stuart comes to the same conclusion. :)

0 ( +1 / -1 )

protest justice

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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