picture of the day

Day to remember

32 Comments

A bride is helped with her traditional wedding costume for memorial photos with her groom, left, just after their marriage at Meiji shrine in Tokyo on Saturday.

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32 Comments
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It's always wonderful treat to catch a glimpse of a wedding party when you are near a temple.

9 ( +8 / -0 )

Over the years I have witnessed many wedding processions at the Meiji shrine and it's still a fascinating spectacle to see. Foreign tourists and native Japanese with cameras out, cries of "Good Luck". Great atmosphere in a beautiful setting.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Great picture. Wedding are wonderful! Sad so many end up in divorce.

Tessa most of the time Japanese men look much younger than their actual age just like their female counterparts.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

I got married like this, except in Kamakura, I remember that a crowd gathered around us during the ceremony (one of a number at the sme shrine that day), and pareted as we walked off, with a round of applause. An extra bonus on an already special day.

7 ( +6 / -0 )

I've really appreciate the politeness of the lady without shoes on the carpet..

6 ( +7 / -1 )

This reminds me of my daughter's wedding in Kyoto three years ago. Wataboshi, the style of the bride's silk floss headdress seems more popular than the one called Tsunokakushi that I had worn long time ago. All the best for the young couple!*

6 ( +5 / -0 )

That is a very good photo. The gaze of the bride and groom make it.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Another living example of the culture of Japan

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Amazing photograph. Very well done.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

a part of Japanese culture that i hope never dies out to overpriced Christian style /chapel wedding plans +
3 ( +3 / -0 )

It's interesting to read all the posts above. First, there are lots of Japanese wedding photos with lots of smiles on the couples as it's their best day to have their weddings. Secondly, white is not the colour of mourning. It's black so that we put on black clothes for funerals. Thirdly, the style of bride's headdress called Tsunokakushi doesn't mean that she tries to hide her horns which mean 'tsuno' in Japanese. There seems to be many ways of interpretation and that's one of them. I second the idea that 'tsuno' was misread. The original of it was 'corners' with the same Chinese characters.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Beautiful pic, I just love wedding photos. But the groom looks like a teenager!

2 ( +9 / -7 )

@BertieWooster: You are absolutely correct about the Japanese traditional meaning of "Tsuno Kakushi". This to be removed at the "Koromo Gae", changing to a different outfit so she can greet lesser formally and more casually.

@Ah_so: The color white does not only symbolize "death, or mourning", but it means "pure". In this case she is not only "pure" but virgin(?) and "clean".

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The man is so handsome <3

1 ( +3 / -2 )

BertieWooster: You are absolutely correct about the Japanese traditional meaning of 'Tsuno Kakushi.'

Thank you samuraisam-san.

I wonder why three people didn't like to be told about it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The bride does not look very happy which makes me sad. From her expression , i think she may have a touch of the Farmer Giles.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Culture.

Wossat?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's a MEMORIAL photo... who died?

It is definitely true that you do not get many smiles in Japanese wedding photos. One of the funny things about Japanese-Western wedding photos is that you get the Japanese family all appearing to frown and the Westerner and family all grinning from ear to ear in the same photograph.

However, it is even more spot on, possibly unintentionally. White is the colour of mourning in Japan - the bride has died as a member of her birth family and becomes part of her husband's.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The color white does not only symbolize "death, or mourning", but it means "pure". In this case she is not only "pure" but virgin(?) and "clean".

@samuraisam - I am not going to dispute the purity type meaning of white in Japan, much as in the West, with a white wedding gown and the concept of a "white wedding", implying virginity. However, the white of the wedding kimono is explicitly death related - a fact I my wife did not tell me until some years after I had married her in a white kimono (her not me!).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"I wonder why three people didn't like to be told about it."

@BertieWooster:

I not only liked it, but I really appreciated the cultural lesson. I love the formal kimono for the men. Any idea on how much one would cost?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Interesting that the bride in the photo above is wearing a "tsunokakushi."

The tsunokakushi (tsuno (=horns) kakushi(=hide)) is the traditional Japanese wedding headwear for the bride that she wears to hide her horns of jealousy, ego and selfishness. It also symbolizes her resolve to become a gentle and obedient wife.

There doesn't seem to be any equivalent garment for the groom.

I suppose Japanese grooms don't have horns or any other bad points.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Never understood the Japanese lamp shade hats

Culture.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It may be interesting to note that the white wedding dress in Western weddings, rather than another color, only became more common after the Victorian era. Queen Victoria wore white when she married Prince Albert in 1840. Before and after that time, particularly in the U.S., brides continued to wear other colors (yellow, blue, brown, black, etc.) as well as white, often wearing a dress that would be worn again. At that time, white was considered more emblematic of wealth rather than purity, as only wealthy families could afford to buy a dress that would be worn only once and in a color that could be soiled easily.

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_wedding >

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I rememberd my traditional wedding about forty years ago!

-1 ( +1 / -1 )

I don't think I have ever seen a Japanese bridal couple at a traditional wedding ceremony smile. It's supposed to be one of the happiest days of their lives.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

most of the time Japanese men look much younger than their actual age just like their female counterparts.

Well, until about 40, when they age 40 years in a day and start looking about 20 years older than their actual age.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

bride that she wears to hide her horns of jealousy

It is interesting post. The groom is boyish and bride looks old enough to be his Aunty. History has showed youthful men will make their wives getting insecure and Jealous. Anyway I wish them to celebrate many wedding anniversaries.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Never understood the Japanese lamp shade hats

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

It's a MEMORIAL photo... who died?

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Wedding are wonderful! Sad so many end up in divorce.

That's an oxymoron. Divorce creates more weddings, doesn't it?

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Disillusioned,

That's an oxymoron. Divorce creates more weddings, doesn't it?

"No woman, no cry."

(R.Marley)

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

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