picture of the day

Eat your veggies

15 Comments

A giant corn is one of several 15 columns in a passageway at Shinjuku Station in Tokyo, used by the Central Union of Agricultural Co-operatives to promote Japanese agricultural products. They sell 20 kinds of domestically-grown vegetables online via a QR code located on the wall. The campaign runs until Sept 6.

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15 Comments
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Great idea and great photos!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

makes me smile, nice idea

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Japanese corn is the sweetest in the world.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

They could take different stations in Tokyo and make a fruit, meat, dairy, and grain theme as well. I agree that it is cute and is good not just to promote agriculture but also to promote Tokyo as a whole.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

that's corny.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Planning to Visit,,its nice idea.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Great advertising, and a good idea. Might be a bit discombobulating while rushing through the station, but oh well.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Eating more fresh veggies is one of the simplest choice you can make to improve overall health and ward off chronic disease. Virtually any vegetable is good for you, but some are better than others.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The cynic in me is saying that this is a propaganda attempt by JA (the world's largest cartel?) to protest TPP.

Anyway, cheaper and more diverse veggies please. TPP or not, grubby, value-robbing JA must go.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@SenseNotSoCommon

It is easy to blame JA for the price of veggies, and they have a large role to play, but of course there is a complex history of various interest groups that have shaped today's agricultural and market conditions. The link below is to a paper that fills in some of that history. It's an interesting read.

The Postwar Japanese Agricultural Debacle http://www.dgmoen.net/blog/free4alll/essays/essay-1.pdf

0 ( +2 / -2 )

JA is more like a mafia than anything else. If you don't join them, in some situations, especially the organic farmers, other farmers, I've read, will throw salt on their land to bring on evil spirits.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

I suppose this "creative advertising" campaign does look interesting, but will it really make people buy and eat more vegetables? I'm not so sure.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Maize while technically a vegetable, is a starchy veg --> a starch.

A giant eggplant would be cool....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@FizzBit - If I am not mistaken, the practice of throwing salt is to repel evil spirits. If you have ever watched sumo wrestling, they do it on the dohyo before the bouts. I have also seen it on both sides of the entrance of some homes and businesses, and was told it was to "keep away bad spirits".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I know, I could be wrong, but that's what I remember the organic farmer saying.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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