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Egyptian rally

47 Comments

Egyptians living in Japan demonstrate in front of the Egyptian embassy in Tokyo on Sunday. About 150 Egyptians gathered for the protest against the military-backed interim government led crackdowns on supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

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Surely their protest would be more effective if done back in Egypt?

6 ( +12 / -6 )

Don't fool yourself, these guys are the Muslim Brotherhood's good old friends, the very same guys who burn down Coptic Christian churches and kill innocent people who oppose them without blinking an eye.

16 ( +26 / -10 )

tokyobakayaro, I was going to say that but you beat me to it. Looks like these guys want the Muslim Brotherhood to run Egypt and impose Sharia law. Maybe they should go back to Egypt and join their brethren in facing the military themselves, not doing it from the comfort of Japan.

10 ( +14 / -4 )

That policeman just became aware of a country called Egypt....

1 ( +10 / -9 )

I'm not fooling myself; you missed my point.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

No thanks religion.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

Looks like these guys want the Muslim Brotherhood to run Egypt and impose Sharia law.

Correction: Looks like these guys want the Muslim Brotherhood to run JAPAN and impose Sharia law.

-1 ( +9 / -10 )

They are correct in that Morsi was elected fair and square and the Junta that took power by the barrel of a gun has no legitimacy whatsoever.

Moreover, whatever moral high ground the Military had claimed was immediately lost when they opened fire on unarmed citizens in the streets.

Under no circumstances should a government ever use machine guns against unarmed crowds, especially if children are present. Whoever gave the order to open fire on the crowd is guilty of a war crime.

-5 ( +9 / -14 )

Dear Fellow JT posters. According to the BBC more than 830 people have been killed in the streets in Egypt since last Wednesday.

That is what these guys are protesting again.

They are not calling for Sharia law in Japan!!

You may not follow their religion or political beliefs but a bit of sympathy for thier plight might be in order.

If it was in your homeland....?

5 ( +14 / -9 )

Correction: Looks like these guys want the Muslim Brotherhood to run JAPAN and impose Sharia law.

Very unlikely. The political hardliners in Japan wouldn't let that happens.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

With so many murdered in their homeland, this is understandable. Which side is the Egyptian Ambassador?

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Agree if they are so concerned then return to Egypt and help their brothers, standing around in tokyo holding a sign in the peace and comfort here is of no help really.

Give peace a chance, say no to religion !

6 ( +8 / -2 )

These guys' shock and fear will be shared by all Egyptians, regardless of political or religious affiliations.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

What do any of us know what they want? It is very presumptuous to assume that these people in the picture want Sharia law or to burn down churches!

In fact it is more than presumptious, it is ridiculous and inflammatory !

6 ( +11 / -5 )

What am I missing? How are you so sure that they are Muslim Brotherhood members and not just protesting because a democratically elected government was overthrown by a coup and over 700 people, most of them unarmed, were killed on the streets?

Agree or disagree with their politics, you still have the right to gather and demonstrate in Japan. Comments suggesting they should go elsewhere to do so show a lack of respect for basic democratic rights and are as frightening as the Sharia law some of you are suggesting, with absolutely no evidence, that they are trying to impose on Japan. You know nothing about them and whether or not their circumstances allow them to return to Egypt.

Additionally, demonstrating in countries other than Egypt brings attention to what's going on there and possible pressure from other governments for Egypt to stop the slaughter of its own citizens.

As if they could actually impose Sharia law here anyway. The absurdity of the suggestion nearly made me choke on my ramen. Good luck getting Japanese girls to cover more than 50% of their bodies at any time of the year or getting the business men to give up their booze and porn!

2 ( +8 / -6 )

So this mob was pro-Morsi? Where were the anti-Morsi people?

2 ( +6 / -4 )

AKBfan: So this mob was pro-Morsi? Where were the anti-Morsi people?

Mob: (noun) A large crowd of people, esp. one that is disorderly and intent on causing trouble or violence. (verb) Crowd around (someone) in an unruly and excitable way in order to admire or attack them

.

Where is the mob? I don't see anything in that photo but some people holding placards. Not a one even has a mouth open. And why are they a mob if they are pro-Morsi but people if they are anti-Morsi?

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

So this mob was pro-Morsi? Where were the anti-Morsi people?

Who says they're pro-Morsi? Looks like they're anti-massacre.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

These guys (the Muslim Brotherhood) is truly practicing the art of the "long con," as they've been around since the fifties and are always working in the background to worm their way into governments.

Including the U.S. government.

Don't discount the real threat of Islam to Western Society.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

I wonder if the crowd were all Egyptians or it included those from other countries wanting to protest too. I doubt that anyone checked.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@gaijininfo Correct. Looks like many people aren't aware of what the Muslim Brotherhood is about apart from what they hear from the media. Actually they've been around longer, since the 1920's.

The Brotherhood's stated goal is to instill the Qur'an and Sunnah as the "sole reference point for ...ordering the life of the Muslim family, individual, community ... and state." The movement is known for engaging in political violence, claiming responsibility for the installation of Hamas.[8] Muslim Brotherhood members are suspected to have assassinated political opponents like Egyptian Prime Minister Mahmoud an-Nukrashi Pasha.[7][8][9]

As it continued to rise in influence, starting in 1936, it began to oppose British rule in Egypt.[10] Many Egyptian nationalists accuse the Muslim Brotherhood of violent killings during this period.[11] After the Arab defeat in the First Arab-Israeli war, the Egyptian government dissolved the organization and arrested its members.[10] It supported the Egyptian Revolution of 1952, but after an attempted assassination of Egypt's president it was once again banned and repressed.[12] The Muslim Brotherhood has been suppressed in other countries as well, most notably in Syria in 1982 during the Hama massacre.[13]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muslim_Brotherhood

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I find it quite remarkable that over the past three years, the middle east has started to come unglued. It's a house of cards with Jordan and Saudi Arabia among the few holdouts. I'm not entirely sure what is the blame for this (Al-Jazeera, Facebook, etc. have been suggested). Clearly the population bomb, which is responsible for a huge segment of young people unable to secure decent jobs, is a major factor. I can't see much a future for these countries, and people's turning to religion for a solution will only exacerbate the problem.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

wow in jp? @avigator agree any religion always causes war or some fight -_-

2 ( +2 / -0 )

They are a mob. Look at them. Having a rally. All 150 of them. I still wonder where the pro-government mob were gathered.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I am against all of this violence! I do hope these Egyptians do not start fighting each other here in Japan.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

AKBfan: They are a mob. Look at them. Having a rally. All 150 of them. I still wonder where the pro-government mob were gathered.

Your grasp of the English language is pretty tenuous if you really and truly understand the people in the photo to be a mob. The police officer clearly doesn't share your sentiment either, as is evident from his body language, which is pretty relaxed for him being in the middle of a "mob". Nice try at stirring the pot though.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I agree.......does nothing protesting in the streets of a far away country in front of the embassy. If you really feel for your brothers and sisters back home....go back there and protest.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

If you really feel for your brothers and sisters back home....go back there and protest.

And get mowed down.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@garymalmgren

If it was in your homeland....?

I appreciate what you are saying, but I'm really glad my homeland doesn't have this kind of crap...

... except for troublemakers from other countries who bring their nonsense with them. I'd be very happy to see them deported as soon as thy show any inclination of misbehaving, back home and in Japan.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I hope the interim Egyptian gov't is able to keep order without having to kill any more protestors, though the Brotherhood is making that quite difficult. Also that the next election is carried out fairly.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I still wonder where the pro-government mob were gathered.

You mean the government that was deposed, or the US-backed junta?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Harry_Gatto

I'm not fooling myself; you missed my point.

I'm sorry I misunderstood your message, my english in not enough good to understand all nuances.

For those who are too naive about these guys (and yes I say guys) just look for women on that JT picture...where are the women among them? Do you see girls, women? of course not, no women are allowed. In normal life with normal people when a demo takes place, you usually see men and women unhappy about something and taking the streets. Not with these guys.

Don't you find this strange? We can find find few videos on Youtube of muslims demos in Tokyo with these guys but everytime I watch them I do not see a lot of girls maybe not even one. Last time I saw them making a demo about the infamous Youtube trailer "The Innocence of Muslims" and some of them were calling for death of the director...right here in Japan, right now, bearded guys calling for death of a guy who made a movie.

If they are so unhappy about what is going on in Egypt, they should go back to Egypt and fight there not in Japan. I always found it pathetic to make a demo in front of embassies, it is not just the embassies were important or could change something back home. It is ridiculous.

The video is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Nu9CcEZJQU

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Pretty hopeless in Egypt, Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran and maybe Libya too.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japanese police could benefit from some rubbet bullet and tear gaz training to disperse those...if you want sharia law - get the hell out of an Buddhist / Secular country

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What do any of us know what they want? It is very presumptuous to assume that these people in the picture want Sharia law or to burn down churches!

The fact that they're supporting the Muslim Brotherhood, the group whose followers are responsible for burning dozens of churches and Christian-owned businesses makes them indirectly complicit in their crimes.

http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/1/64/79124/Egypt/Politics-/Churches-torched-across-Egypt-in-antiCoptic-violen.aspx

Make no mistake of the aims of the MB. From its very founding it has been very clear about its stance on Sharia law.

Hassan al-Banna founded the Muslim Brotherhood in the city of Ismailia in March 1928 along with six workers of the Suez Canal Company, as a Pan-Islamic, religious, political, and social movement. The Suez Canal Company helped Banna build the mosque in Ismailia that would serve as the Brotherhood's headquarters, according to Richard Mitchell's The Society of Muslim Brothers.[31] According to al-Banna, contemporary Islam had lost its social dominance, because most Muslims had been corrupted by Western influences. Sharia law based on the Qur'an and the Sunnah were seen as laws passed down by God that should be applied to all parts of life, including the organization of the government and the handling of everyday problems.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muslim_Brotherhood

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Japan, keep an eye on these guys.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Genjuro,

The fact that they're supporting the Muslim Brotherhood

They're protesting a bloody massacre. Anyone would do so, regardless of their political affiliation.

Mohamed ElBaradei, VP of the interim government, resigned in protest. Does that make him an Islamist too?

Enough of this simplistic with us or against us BS!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

If you are so interested in being politically active, or demonstrating for your particular religious prejudices then it would only make sense to do so in your home country. Beyond hoping that one day the Egyptians can get their act together and make it safe for the world to visit the pyramids again, the rest of us don't care how you run your show.

And if you choose not be "active" for your cause and escape to a place like Japan instead, then don't bring your sordid baggage with you please.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

if they are so concerned why don't they go home and fix the problem why should Japan do their dirty work?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

arrest them for civil disobedience on public property and deport them to egypt

0 ( +4 / -4 )

They're protesting a bloody massacre. Anyone would do so, regardless of their political affiliation.

@GetReal I can say the same thing to you that that's a simplistic observation of these folks. I think you should read what tokyobakayaro wrote above:

Don't you find this strange? We can find find few videos on Youtube of muslims demos in Tokyo with these guys but everytime I watch them I do not see a lot of girls maybe not even one. Last time I saw them making a demo about the infamous Youtube trailer "The Innocence of Muslims" and some of them were calling for death of the director...right here in Japan, right now, bearded guys calling for death of a guy who made a movie.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

i don't see any women in the pic. I wonder how many women were at the rally?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

So, the lesson to be learned by many of the posts above is that only those whose views you agree with should be allowed to demonstrate. It's good to see democratic principles alive and well. I'm well aware of what the Muslim Brotherhood are about and am in no way, shape or form a supporter but calls for them to go home and protest are ridiculous. As long as the rest of us are allowed the right to demonstrate and protest in Japan they are within their rights. If, and I mean if, they were to ever violate Japanese law, then yes, they should be jailed and or kicked out but until then they are practicing the same rights you have and that Japanese who protested in Washington D.C and London against nuclear energy had. If you want their rights taken away you are no better than what you think they are.

To quote the late, great Oscar Wilde:

I may not agree with you, but I'll defend to the death your right to let you make an ass of yourself.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Genjuro,

Is Mohamamed ElBaradei, who resigned as VP of the interim government, by definition as supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood?

Or, perhaps, is simply being Muslim enough to condemn him and 1.6Bn others?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Abrosia, they are using democratic process to get rid of the democratic process itself as shown over many times. As such they are a trojan horse and should be treated accordingly.

Politics, cannot be based on religion.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Alex Einz: Abrosia, they are using democratic process to get rid of the democratic process itself as shown over many times. As such they are a trojan horse and should be treated accordingly. Politics, cannot be based on religion.

I absolutely agree with that last statement, however, they still have the right to demonstrate as long as they are doing so within the confines of the law. Like it or not, that is the democratic process. Trying to stop someone from protesting because you don't like the message flies in the face of democracy. If Japan were to ban the party from existing here that would be a whole other story but until that happens, I defend their right to demonstrate even if I don't agree with them on most, if not all, issues.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Get Real,

Funny rhetorical question. How do you explain that those who are against the MB and their supporters are also Muslim, and in fact are supporting the crackdown of the military? Maybe you should condemn him and the 1.6B you mentioned, since you just lumped all of them together. And you conveniently skipped tokyobakayaro's comment on these guys in the pic. Are they friends of yours, by any chance?

Anyway, thank goodness for the Middle Eastern journalists to clear the misinformation being reported by Western media.

What will be interesting is to see how much attention is paid by the same American and European political leaders – who responding to disturbing television images, cannot resist criticizing the government and the armed forces – to the minister of interior’s announcement Wednesday night that 43 policemen were killed and more than 140 wounded. This came among the 21 police stations attacked upon the orders of the MB, the band that successfully stormed the Kerdesa police station (not far from the Giza pyramids), not only killed the policemen on duty there but mutilated their bodies.

The minister said pretty much what Prime Minister Beblawi had said earlier in the day – that the government had tried to negotiate a peaceful end to the sit-ins but the Muslim Brotherhood refused anything less than a return of Mursi to power. What lends credibility to this claim is that only a few days ago Ahmed Maher, the founder and co-leader of the April 6 Youth Movement (the liberal-left group that organized the 2011 demonstrations against Mubarak), charged that it was the Muslim Brotherhood who were refusing all compromises and were seeking escalation of the crisis.

As for ElBaradei's resignation:

That is probably why Mohamed ElBaradei’s resignation on Wednesday as vice prime minster had been greeted with contempt by nearly every analyst on the evening TV talk shows and described as an opportunist, also by the Tamarod leadership who had hailed ElBaradei only last month as the symbol of resistance to Muslim Brotherhood rule. ElBaradei said he cannot take responsibility for the cabinet’s decision to end the sit-ins. But one might say that is ElBaradei’s way – not taking responsibility, taking on the leadership of the opposition to Mubarak and then travelling abroad for weeks on end and not being here to provide that leadership, announcing he would run for president and then presumably in the face of opposition from both Mubarkists and the Muslim Brotherhood, withdrawing as a candidate. His resignation does not come as a surprise.

And as for your contention that it's a "bloody massacre", you should try reading other news sources other than Western ones.

A massacre is not combat. A massacre is the unprovoked slaughter of non-violent, peaceful civilians, or of combatants who have already surrendered. Neither case was applicable on Wednesday. There has been a tragic loss of life, particularly at Nasr City, but the MB should remember the saying that sometimes one may not like what one gets, when one gets what one wishes for.

What I mean by that is, one cannot say day after day, as the Muslim Brothers at both sit-ins have said, that they welcome martyrdom, that they are more than ready to die for their cause, and they have brought their wives and children to the sit-ins and they are willing for them to die also. You cannot say this day after day, and then cry out in horror and shock: “Look, the police are killing us!” What happened on Wednesday will be further unraveled, but this time, the particularly tragic case of the Muslim Brotherhood shows they have underestimated the degree that they have alienated just about everybody else in this country.

http://english.alarabiya.net/en/views/news/middle-east/2013/08/15/Misinformation-about-Egypt-s-massacre-.html

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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