picture of the day

Elderly care

18 Comments

Elderly women receive help from staff members at a nursing home in Tokyo. The government is hoping to encourage laid-off workers to receive training and take up positions in understaffed nursing homes.

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18 Comments
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Caring for the infirm takes a lot of patience and understanding. Are the unemployed masses, disgruntled from getting the axe in their current jobs, going to be able to muster that kind of sensitivity?

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I don't think Japan Today has placed this picture for a debate about care workers. They have placed a picture of a care worker wearing a flu mask in a nursing home and are hoping that this will spark a debate about care workers wearing flu masks.

Moderator: We posted the photo so readers could discuss whether they think it is a good idea or not for unemployed people to be given jobs in health care facilities.

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Caring for the infirm takes a lot of patience and understanding. Are the unemployed masses, disgruntled from getting the axe in their current jobs, going to be able to muster that kind of sensitivity?

definitely. seems that care work is far too sensitive a profession to let people wander into it. this is how abuse can happen. shame that they would rather let some emotionally unstable Taro do the job rather than some willing and able nurses from overseas...

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Very good idea. Just set up the proper supervision so abuse does not happen. Pay well. One has to eat and there is work to be had. Most people will step up to the plate.

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Exactly - supervision will be the key. My mother was in a nursing home for a while. To work there would take a lot of patience, knowledge and hard work, and the pay doesn't really match all a person puts into the job. Not for everyone, but to those who do this job well - we appreciate you!

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The idea seems good on paper but...most of the newly redundant unemployed are probably getting on a bit in life themselves. I hope there is ample cigarette and coffee machines in nursing homes.

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supervision will be the key

who supervises the supervisor?

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Why are these "helpers" wearing masks? Are they afraid of getting some disease from the elderly patients. or what? I think its a good idea to give employment to people in this way, though, provided they will genuine;ly CARE for the elderly and not treat them like animals.

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Commendable achievement. No excuses, finally someone has a bright idea to solve two important issues simultaneously. This should work!! The caretakers should be well taken care of, and good incentives be given to them. Taking care of the elderly is not easy at all but it has to be done. What a relief!

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This sounds like a good idea and hopefully the ones who can not stomach this work will quit and try and find something else. This is very hard work and not for everyone. Hopefully they put the trainees in the full spectrum and have them deal with those that are mentally handicapped as well. This training is not something that can be taken lightly.

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What?

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These masks on care assistants are a very good idea on the part of the unemployed men who take the job.

"Now Mrs. Sato, the man who hit you and took your money - what did he look like?"

A tragedy waiting to happen, this.

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For those who say the masks are so that the care givers won't catch anything from the elderly, I think that belies a typically selfish, me-centered view. And let me guess, you are all Westerners? In most western countries I would bet that people wear masks so as not to catch anything. In my experiences in Japan, Japanese people where masks so they don't give anything to others.

I think just as likely an explanation of masks is that the caregivers don't give people with weakened immune systems something.

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The woman on the left looks to be truly tiny. As an aside my wife's grandmother has Alzheimer's and is in a nursing home in Nagasaki. The staff is excellent and the care she recieves is first rate. It's really taken a huge burden off of our family.

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SiouxGirl at 01:26 PM JST - 4th June

Exactly - supervision will be the key. My mother was in a nursing home for a while. To work there would take a lot of patience, knowledge and hard work, and the pay doesn't really match all a person puts into the job. Not for everyone, but to those who do this job well - we appreciate you!

You are so right, am in the same position. To work with the elderly takes a very special kind of person. There are many very dedicated people doing this work. No way could I do it.

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It is my express wish that Mrs. Coughalot give me a fine dinner and few brandies, then put a pillow over my face when I nod off over me trifle if I ever reach the stage whee bunging me in a facility like this becomes an option.

I was a shade disappointed by how little persuasion she needed.

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IvanCoughalot

Sounds a good way to go but I don't think I'll give mine that option. It might be before I'm ready!

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jonnyboy - there will be a chain of supervisors and at the top will be the manager and a board of directors

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