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Hills Christmas

12 Comments

Omotesando Hills in Tokyo is decorated for Christmas Friday. Decorations will last until Dec 25.

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12 Comments
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too early! these people can't wait to get profit for Christmas! at least let Thanksgiving pass before decorating.... or maybe these Marketing people has really no sense of international holidays?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

noypikantoku:

My family in Boston says Christmas went up before Halloween for the last 10 years. Friends in LA, NYC, Baltimore, London, Paris, Rome, Melbourne, Vilnius, and even Moscow say the same. So it seems Japan is keeping up and actually may be a bit late with the decorating.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Man,they are only decorations,chill out

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I wouldn't mind people making a big deal about Christmas for two months if they didn't all go to work on Christmas Day and think KFC and a sponge cake is the height of Yuletide feasting.

Have a day off and eat a decent meal with your family at least. Or don't bother at all.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Here's the rule: Decorations stay up AFTER Christmas for the same number of days they were up BEFORE Christmas.

Maybe we need a new term, "October Fool--one who displays Christmas decorations in October."

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Harald

Japanese people enjoy celebrating Christmas in their own way just as much as you do in your way. There is no one way or right way to celebrate Christmas.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Brainiac is right. I prefer my family's traditions because that's what I grew up with, doesn't mean someone else's Christmas has to be the same.

That said I do feel Christmas in Japan is often just a commercial shell. I love the oshogatsu season which is richer in tradition and family gatherings, but you know how much Japanese like an excuse to do light-ups and illumination events...that's what Christmas is about here.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

What's wrong if they start Christmas early, not lije there is a holiday in November they can celebrate. After Halloween, people are already starting Christmas decorations and shopping.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Too early -- turns Christmas from 'special' to 'unspecial'.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

In the old days primitive peoples all over the northern hemisphere lit bonfires and burned logs in the hearth to ward off the darkest winter days. The Romans took it to another level with a 12-day Saturnalia. (Think of it as bonenkai times 12!) The Holy Roman Church tried to sanctify and purify that debauchery by overlaying that with Christmas.

It's been a mixed success with nothing that is "truly" anything ever since. Christmas "traditions" have continued to change through the ages and in the various countries which practise them. Japan has come to it late, but Japanese "traditions" continue to evolve as well. Though for a country that does things to mind-boggling perfection, how they got stuck on KFC and tasteless sponge is an unfathomable mystery. But I digress.

It's only natural (maybe even a remnant part of our primitive/pagan DNA) to light up the night as the darkness increases. In Japan, walking about in sparkling malls and parks and gardens is a delightful way to get out of cramped apartments, enjoy a spectacle and add to the local economy by grabbing a beer or a bite with your friends. Or a way to enjoy some family time and see your little ones agog with the wonder of it all.

Yes, individual attachments to "Christmas" and what that means personally also remain. However, there's no reason that those private moments need to be impacted by what goes on in public space. That doesn't make it less "special." Not if you don't let it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Let's get to that KFC!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Brainiac:

There is no one way or right way to celebrate Christmas.

True, but there are many ways to do it wrongly. Going to work and not celebrating it is one.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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