Japan Today
Image: Japan Today
picture of the day

Luggage manners

19 Comments

A manners poster is seen on the wall of a subway station in Tokyo.

© Japan Today

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

19 Comments
Login to comment

Interesting that there is not one person on the poster with dark brown or black hair. Just sayin'.

S

-8 ( +12 / -20 )

There is someone with blue hair, though, and no one with a long or high nose.

This is such a stupid poster because it is written especially, but not exclusively, for foreigners but the sentiment is cryptically vague for the same foreigners. The poster would be much better if it said, "Take off your backpacks and put them on the overhead racks as well as any small suitcases than can be lifted so that you aren't bumping others with your luggage." "Handle your luggage with others in mind" is so vague, but Japanese who see the poster and then see any foreigners who are not getting the vague point can assume that the foreigners just don't care, rather than don't understand Japanese expressions and sensitivities. Let's be kind to everyone, and make posters that have some meaning! (See the little red heart in the upper right of the poster, where the English is so small)

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Most Japanese on the trains I ride leave their backpacks on and their bags and briefcases on the floor, with people fairly regularly sitting on the floor on the late-night trains, blocking the flow and the doors. There are some who wear their packs on the front but that can be very annoying for the people who are seated. The vast majority do not use the overhead racks. On a side note, I see someone listened when I posted that it should be "manners" and not "manner" on the headline and in the article.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

So this poster only features foreigners?

-7 ( +5 / -12 )

People must miss their trains reading the many manner posts.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I guess these manner posters only apply to train travellers in Tokyo. We don't have any.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

So, no picture of a guy with a big backpack on backwards, carving out space intentionally so that he can hold his smartphone on top of it to play a game or watch videos, while smashing everyone else?

5 ( +7 / -2 )

In Tokyo and surrounding area! I have found that 90% of tourists and Japanese with suitcases are quite respectful (note my closest train line us the train to Narita airport so regularly packed with travelers).

The problem people are foreign backpackers and to a lesser degree Japanese with backpacks.

Today only about half the young Japanese remove their backpacks and place them Infront, more often it is the young women that will do this and the young men often don't.

As for the foreign backpackers! Well they are the worse! Their giant backpacks they don't remove in the train, I was told by a few:

"this isn't a schoolbag backpack, it doesn't come off as easily and is difficult to put back on so no!"

I asked nicely to remove their backpack out if curiosity they seemed quite offended to be asked to consider others before their own convenience.

Now if I describe how they are dressed and what they look like in general, they wouldn't look like anything in this poster.

Now I do see a good number of older backpackers, yes retired couples and 9 out of 10 remove their giant backpacks before getting on the train.

I know just a personal observation but taking the same train that goes to and from Narita airport regularly, I may see a larger number of travelers then would be normal.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

wallace

Today 11:23 am JST

I guess these manner posters only apply to train travellers in Tokyo. We don't have any.

I can't be sure but these posters are in Nishi-nippori one station over from Nippori station where the Keisei, and the Narita Sky Access (Skyliner), the same poster is also at other Metro stations were trains arrive from Narita and Haneda

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Oddly enough, we often hear complaints about Chinese tourists.

But on the train to and from Narita, the Chinese and Japanese in my experience are the best behaved when it comes to their luggage.

They need their bags close out of the doorway, and will tuck them in as best possible if seated!

Not sure why, maybe because in their country like Japan public transportation is jammed packed, maybe they are worried about theft? I don't know but both the Japanese and Chinese I see regularly on the train from Narita tend to keep thing very close and out of the way if possible!

I can't say the same about many of the westerners I see. Often right Infront of the doors, my guess from their behaviour is they are not sure where they get off or what station is next so they just stay close to the doors.

All this is just my observations and guessing!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

If the trains weren't so damned, crowded then it wouldn't be the issue it is. And before you downvote me, JR et al keep covertly changing the frequency and types of trains to keep them perpetually packed. Even with a falling population and less riders due to telework, flexible working hours, etc, these companies collude to keep the trains as packed as possible and then have the audacity to bombard us with useless posters insinuating that it's somehow our fault that our bags inconvenience other passengers. Sick of it.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

No one is going to be using those overhead bins when they can barely squeeze onto the train. You'd be knocking people out left and right just attempting such a feat. It would be nice if trains in Japan had a dedicated luggage space. Even the luggage spaces on the bullet trains are tiny and limited.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

It would be nice if trains in Japan had a dedicated luggage space.

Wouldn't work since trains are jam packed and keep to such tight schedules. Best just to have more frequent, uncrowded trains.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

"It would be nice if trains in Japan had a dedicated luggage space."

Trains in Japan DO in fact have a dedicated luggage space, as illustrated in the Tokyo Metro poster...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Trains in Japan DO in fact have a dedicated luggage space, as illustrated in the Tokyo Metro poster...

Yeah they do but are mostly inaccessible, especially when needed the most, I.e. when there are loads of people on the train (which is pretty much all the time). And good luck trying to get your luggage onto one of the racks unless you are over 6ft tall, with long arms. But even if you can get it up there, there is no guarantee you'll be able to reach that spot again, as you literally churned on and off the train at each stop.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I guess the way people handle their bags, etc., can be improved but not a huge problem for me. It would be nice if more used the overheard racks but I think people are worried about forgetting their bags.

The issue for me is the use of smartphones on trains and in stations. How many times do I have to move to avert those walking with their eyes fixed on their smartphones and it's often not work related but personal in nature or...dumb games. It isn't pleasant having a smartphone inches from your face when you can't move. People sticking their elbows out jabbing my arms when sitting so they can watch netlfix or chat on LINE. And it's only going to get worse.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Don't put your bags onto overhead racks

Rushing to Transfer trains between haneda and naritaI I left my bag (containing my family's passports)n the overhead rack

We missed the flight and spent Christmas an airport hotel

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Yes yes yes. The trains are bad, Japanese people are bad, riding on the trains is bad.

At least there is this attempt with the poster there is an effort to make things better. Effective? Maybe not, but an attempt. All the posters like this one I saw when I was there had non-Japanese people. It isn't a racist thing, but like anime, Most of the characters look like non-Japanese people. It is something very typical.

If the Japanese are so bad and if the trains are so bad, then move to a rural area or go back to your countries where the people and transportation are oh so perfect.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

RotenMay 7  08:56 am JST Japanese who see the poster and then see any foreigners who are not getting the vague point can assume that the foreigners just don't care, rather than don't understand Japanese expressions and sensitivities. Let's be kind to everyone, and make posters that have some meaning! (See the little red heart in the upper right of the poster, where the English is so small)

You're probably not wrong but I do wonder what they think when they see Japanese who don't seem to care. To be fair, I'm not so sure either foreigners or Japanese don't care so much as they are just doing what works for them within the confines of crowded trains where you might get pushed past your bag if you do manage to get it on an overhead rack.

3RENSHOMay 7  08:05 pm JST

"It would be nice if trains in Japan had a dedicated luggage space."

Trains in Japan DO in fact have a dedicated luggage space, as illustrated in the Tokyo Metro poster...

Good luck getting anything larger than a small shopping bag or purse on the racks. There's no way a proper backpack or even most luggage that would fit in an airplane's overhead bin will fit on those racks.

Gene HennighToday  12:57 am JST Yes yes yes. The trains are bad, Japanese people are bad, riding on the trains is bad. At least there is this attempt with the poster there is an effort to make things better. Effective? Maybe not, but an attempt. All the posters like this one I saw when I was there had non-Japanese people. It isn't a racist thing, but like anime, Most of the characters look like non-Japanese people. It is something very typical.

If the Japanese are so bad and if the trains are so bad, then move to a rural area or go back to your countries where the people and transportation are oh so perfect.

Or, maybe accept the fact that in a democratic country with constitutional freedom of speech, people are allowed to complain. You may not like it but that's your problem. Many of the posters live, work and pay taxes in Japan. In so far as they are following the laws, it's no one's business whether or not they want to complain. Those complaints may be perfectly legitimate and coupled with attempts they've made to improve on life in Japan or they may simply be ways of letting off steam. They may be complaints I'd agree with or not but either way, they don't bother me. If they bother you that much I'd suggest going to a site where the news and comments are nothing but sunshine and lolly pops and staying off ones where the comments aggrivate you.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites