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May Day

13 Comments

Singer May J, who is a "campaign ambassador" for the KitKat chocolate brand, poses with a university student at an event in Tokyo on Thursday to encourage high school students going on to higher education. Many students were invited to the event to talk about their dreams and get encouragement from May J. KitKat is considered a lucky item for students in Japan. The pronunciation of "KitKat" can also mean "You may win" in Japanese.

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My son buys 'em for me !

I forgot to mention - he also helps me eat 'em !

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Tell that to all the elementary school kids who leave all their candy wrappers in the lobby or outside the building I work at

That's because you work in Osaka.

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Marketing with a pretty face. I don't imagine it will hurt sales.

I wonder how the young man got lucky enough to get up close with the singer?

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lol you think I just live on the streets??

They've been sold by the bag in most any supermarket for ages now. One would think if no one was eating them that they would have stopped selling them ages ago.

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chinpira, cleo, lol you think I just live on the streets??

Anyway May J is cool. I like her.

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I tried KitKat once. As my former neighbor would say, I wouldn't seek them out."

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

As for the pic, she doesn't look too enthused,

exactly, perhaps photographer forgot to say 'hi cheese.' :)

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My son buys 'em for me !

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chinpira: "as you are already probably aware, public eating... in general, is frowned upon here."

Tell that to all the elementary school kids who leave all their candy wrappers in the lobby or outside the building I work at as they sit around playing hand-held devices or card games. Or to the people on the trains. I see it all the time, and oikawa, Kit-Kat is more popular here, it seems, than overseas (a lot more chocolate bar options in general in the latter). They also have some decent Kit-Kat flavors once in a while that you would never see elsewhere, though I generally do not eat sweets.

As for the pic, she doesn't look too enthused, and I'm not sure what her message has to do with Kit-Kat. Anyway, because of the word-play with the name, I know a lot of kids who eat it around entrance exam periods, or post-offices giving them away if you buy certain other items. As far as chocolate goes, I like Kit-Kat. Always trusty, and somewhat nostalgic.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I would say more like, "You're sure to win" (きっと勝つ). "You may win" sounds a bit feeble!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Mr cleo loves Kitkat, he buys them by the bag and I have to get in quick if I want one.

They are very popular. You just don't see people eating on the streets.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Really? Never seen anyone eat one in 10 years or so here. Was just thinking recently why they were still on sale.

True... but then again I haven't seen anyone eat any kind of confectionery in 15 years or so here... as you are already probably aware, public eating... in general, is frowned upon here.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

KitKat is considered a lucky item for students in Japan.

Really? Never seen anyone eat one in 10 years or so here. Was just thinking recently why they were still on sale.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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