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Meeting of minds

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Nobel Prize in physics co-winner Shuji Nakamura, left, a Japanese-born American professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, poses with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe for photographers during his courtesy call at Abe's official residence in Tokyo on Wednesday. Nakamura along with Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano of Japan won the Nobel Prize for the invention of blue light-emitting diodes - a new energy efficient and environment-friendly light source.

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Mr. Abe is just so happy on every photo.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Should read MIND not minds!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Actually, they have a big commonality. They both seek power.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

One, a man who scorns the Japanese workplace system and business ethic so much that he changed citizenship and is now extremely successful, the other who embraces the old way so much he's forcing Japan back into the stone age. Definitely not a meeting of LIKE minds.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Little and Large?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Nakamura took US nationality so that he would be cleared to work on US military projects. His and Abe's minds might be more like than you'd imagine.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The nobel prize winner seeks power... for his LED to become something more.

The prime minister seeks power... for his JSDF to become something more.

Nakamura sued the company, despite the contract he signed, to change the rules and get what he felt was owed to him and was admittedly driven by anger.

Abe changed the rules of the country, despite a constitution, because he was driven by what he felt unfairly happened to him in his first term and is driven by arrogance and maybe some anger.

I think they do have some personality similarities, yeah.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I sincerely believe Nakamura-san was in the wrong legally and if his case happened in the US he would not have been able to get a penny out of his employer.

At the same time I recognise that Nakamura-san has a quality that is missing in a lot of Japanese youths today: The qualities of a fighter. Japanese have a lot to learn by emulating Nakamura-san. More power to him as a role model for Japanese scientists!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

One, a man who scorns the Japanese workplace system and business ethic so much that he changed citizenship and is now extremely successful, the other who embraces the old way so much he's forcing Japan back into the stone age. Definitely not a meeting of LIKE minds.

Smith,

Like cleo stated, Nakamura stated that he changed his citizenship because the U.S. government would not fund unless you are of U.S. national.

「こちらの大学で研究する上では、米国籍がないと軍の予算がもらえないし、軍に関係する研究もできない。それで市民権を取得した」

http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXLASDC07011_X01C14A0I00000/

In addition, Nakamura also credits certain elements of Japanese corporate culture which enabled him to continue the research.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Alejandro S. ArashiNov. 06, 2014 - 02:57AM JST At the same time I recognise that Nakamura-san has a quality that is missing in a lot of Japanese youths today: The qualities of a fighter.

Yes. He was actually far less concerned about money than he was about gaining acknowledgment. He also criticized the realities facing scientists in Japan, along with Japan's education system. That you won't become creative in Japan by cramming for entrance exams, and these College exams should be abolished. In Japan, company is the king and its researcher a slave. Japan will not change and will produce fewer and fewer creative researcher.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

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