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Message for the PM

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A protester wears a mask reading "Stop War" during a rally in front of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's official residence in Tokyo on Thursday. They gathered to protest against the Japanese government's plan to amend he constitution to enable an expanded role for the Japanese military.

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http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/cm/main?d=20140626-00000173-jij-pol&s=lost_points&o=desc&p=28

abe is pushing komeito for a war,,, Seriously another war

the earth will be finished by more nukes abe

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Either Man will put an end to war, or war will put an end to Man.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

People, who is Japan goig to go to war with? PRC has more than enough nukes and military to take over Japan at any time. I doubt that Japan will go against SK since they are just about on par with the Japanese military, and as many times as NK has abducted, lobbed missiles and done any other rhetoric, Japan will not go to war with them.

All Abe wants to do, is change the constitution so that if some day Japan wants the right, as any other nation to send their troops to defend their interests, it can. Nothing about once the constitution is changed then the war will start. If, they wanted to change the constitution and institute a draft of military eligible young men, then maybe one could worry. But with the current attitudes of Japan, I doubt very seriously that if the constitution is changed would there be an increase in the numbers of men joining the SDF to build them to a war footing.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

What war do they want stopped? ALL war?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

As usual, the protest attracted a tiny crowd filled mainly by aging Communist and their Socialist allies. The lack of coverage by any other news source is proof of this. If this protest had more than 100 people every news source in Japan would have shown it.

Hell, the photographer didn't dare pan out and instead provided a close up shot of one person with a silly hand mask.

If the left really wants to end the threat of war they best start protesting in front of Communist China's embassy or maybe get on their phones and call their friends in Communist China and ask them to try to stop their invasions of neighbors.

A protester wears a mask reading “Stop War” during a rally in front of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s official residence in Tokyo on Thursday. They gathered to protest against the Japanese government’s plan to amend he constitution to enable an expanded role for the Japanese military.

The propaganda being tossed out is really too funny.

"Stop war" is now the far lefts battle cry, even though no wars are being fought by the Japanese military. They continue their silly attempt to derail Japan's progress with their tiny protests..

masanoriyamamotoJun. 27, 2014 - 06:57AM JST http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/cm/main?d=20140626-00000173-jij-pol&s=lost_points&o=desc&p=28 abe is pushing komeito for a war,,, Seriously another war the earth will be finished by more nukes abe

So Abe is pushing for a war?

Inquiring minds want to know what war is he ready to declare and what proof do you have to back up your claim?

AlphaapeJun. 27, 2014 - 07:29AM JST People, who is Japan goig to go to war with? PRC has more than enough nukes and military to take over Japan at any time. I doubt that Japan will go against SK since they are just about on par with the Japanese military, and as many times as NK has abducted, lobbed missiles and done any other rhetoric, Japan will not go to war with them

Their propaganda war against Prime Minister Abe is based on hype and whimsical fantasies. This propaganda war has nothing to do with reality or fact.

Bringing facts and reality to this argument will only irritate the far left and they will start calling you names.

Please remember, sticks and stones may break my bones, but propaganda will never hurt me.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Since it has been over sixty years since Japan was involved in a war, I seriously have to wonder what the message of these protesters is. Perhaps they meant to protest in front of the Chinese prime minister?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I have been searching high and low, but haven't seen a single thing about this protest. Anyone have anything other than a picture?

zichiJun. 27, 2014 - 11:22AM JST The right to assemble demonstrate and protest is an important one even if we don't agree with its meaning.

That's the great thing about living in a truly democratic nation that respects the rights of all people and it is also what separates Japan from Communist China and South Korea.

Japan has many political parties and those parties cover the political spectrum from far left to far right. Communist China and South Korea don't.

South Korea banned the Communist Party back in 46' and while they have had Socialist party's they were all watched carefully.

While Communist China claims to have many political parties each and everyone are just puppets of the Communist Party.

So, the only nation of the three nations mentioned that respects the views of all it's people's and allows them the rights that all humans should have is Japan.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

The right to assemble demonstrate and protest is an important one even if we don't agree with its meaning.

I don't mind their protesting, it is their right. What I find issue with is what they are protesting. They really don't understand what they are protesting, just like the "No Nukes" people who come outside the base in Yokosuka protesting nuclear power ships with signs like "No more Hiroshima's" when a nuke ship will not go up like an A-bomb. Protest all you like, but at least have some sense what it is you are potesting and just don't parrot someone else's talking points.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

zichiJun. 27, 2014 - 01:48PM JST Why stop at just your pet hates when there are many countries in the world which don't allow the right to protest like Russia, Saudi Arabia (which takes your gas $) and most of the countries in the Middle East. Thailand is another one at the moment.

Because none of the countries you mentioned have been using propaganda and myths against Japan.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Slumdog: If you simply read the paragraph in this tiny article, you will see they are concerned about changing article 9, in a direction that will directly threaten our sixty years of peace. JoeBigs: Why are you surprised that it's hard to find any other sources of information, about this protest? The media rarely gives much coverage, that goes against a governments agenda. Also, you can thank the secrecy act for lack of media responce, for many other issues as well. Remember, if any reporter prints something that goes agaist the secrecy act, they can get themselves, three years jail time! This protest is completely harmless, unless you are a blind nationalist or supporter of the military industrial complex.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

it is also what separates Japan from Communist China

The biggest thing that separates Japan from Communist China is that Japan actually exists, and Communist China doesn't.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Wakarimasen

What war do they want stopped? ALL war?

Maybe it's the War on Drugs they want to stop ??

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Proof yet again (and again and again) that, contrary to the stereotypes of Japanese as being blind sheeple afraid to stand against the grain, ordinary Japanese citizens of all ages DO in fact speak out against the government and voice their opinions in public.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

As sad as it is but war makes money and peace doesn't make money. So why would politicians strive for peace?! Also, war and its fundamental concept 'conflict' are intrinsic to human nature (and almost any other species). In fact how can there be peace if there is no war?!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

To those protesting about the change to Article 9: German forces were deployed for the first time to Kosovo and Bosnia during the Balkans war, and then later as fully fledged combat troops to Afghanistan. Does the rest of the world think that the Bundeswehr will suddenly revert to the ways of the Wehrmacht and SS? No, of course not. German troops are a vital part of NATO and are one of the most technologically advanced countries in the Alliance. The JGSDF will not suddenly turn into the IJA. All the revision means is that should SK or Australia, etc come under attack then the Japanese have the right to defend them.

Just because a country can defend itself and its allies it doesn't follow that said country will become a warmonger.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

German forces were deployed for the first time to Kosovo and Bosnia during the Balkans war, and then later as fully fledged combat troops to Afghanistan.

some ideas are also contradictory since German forces are already part of the international community, being very trusted, currently with no disputes with neighboring (european) countries as well...i don't think asian countries (SK, Australia, etc) are on the right feeling now for Japan to change article nine..the return to japan's military engagement might be nothing but the first step for releasing bullets around senkaku..

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Stuart haywardJun. 27, 2014 - 02:26PM JST JoeBigs: Why are you surprised that it's hard to find any other sources of information, about this protest? The media rarely gives much coverage, that goes against a governments agenda.

Actually, if this protest had more than 100 people in it the news would have covered it. But, it didn't and the news didn't find it worth covering. Only a few outlets posted anything about it.

But, what is missing is a picture that actually shows how little this one was.

Stuart haywardJun. 27, 2014 - 02:26PM JST Also, you can thank the secrecy act for lack of media responce, for many other issues as well. Remember, if any reporter prints something that goes agaist the secrecy act, they can get themselves, three years jail time! This protest is completely harmless, unless you are a blind nationalist or supporter of the military industrial complex.

The secrecy act is against the leaking of state secrets and last time I checked the Communist opposition to the referendum is no state secret.

And since Japan Today reported it and none of their reporters or staff have been tossed in the hoosegow this must mean you are mistaken.

zichiJun. 27, 2014 - 02:29PM JST so what is the connection between your comment and the contents of the post?

Unlike Communist China and South Korea, Japan is the only one that allows all it's citizens to speak there minds openly. No matter how wrong they might be. Hope that help you out.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

JoeBigs: If the you are only offended by the small numbers of protesters, I don't understand why. Besides, the majority of Japanese, don't want to change article nine, that's why Abe continues to go around the public, rather than work for them. Simular to how Abe is handling the safety issues of restarting nuclear plants, if you can't change the publics mind, then simply change the rules and "stack the cards" (NRC) in your favor. As for the secrecy bill, none of us know how far the government will use this, just about anything can be called a state secret or claim to threaten national security. A large peace movement, (during this push for militarization) definetly could be called a threat to politicians and the Military Industrial complex.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Stuart haywardJun. 27, 2014 - 06:52PM JST Besides, the majority of Japanese, don't want to change article nine

Could you please provide some facts to back up your post?

If a majority of Japanese voters were against Prime Minister Abe's plans he and his party wouldn't have won as sharply as they did the last few elections.

If the majority of the Japanese people supported them they would fill the streets day and night. But, they have to bus in protesters from all parts of Japan and elsewhere to even reach 5000 protesters.

Remember, Tokyo has a population of 13 million people, 5000 is nothing.

Stuart haywardJun. 27, 2014 - 06:52PM JST JoeBigs: If the you are only offended by the small numbers of protesters

When did I say I was offended?

I am in opposition of what they believe. I would have to be a very petty person if the opinions of another person insulted me. I believe everyone should have the right to say whatever they want without fear of any person, state or organization.

I live by the words of Evelyn Beatrice Hall, "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it". You have me mistaken.

zichiJun. 27, 2014 - 08:38PM JST No it does not you are just repeating your previous comment. I was asking what's the connection between the topic of the post, a protest about changing the constitution, and your pet hates of China and Korea which aren't even mentioned in the post? Guess, you just like to blow off steam whenever you're given the chance?

If you don't think that Communist China and South Korea are relevant to this topic, well then you haven't been reading the news.

Communist China and South Korea are the only two nations (other than Communist North Korea) that are crying foul. So for this topic those nations are very relevant.

If you think that I am mistaken, please by all means show that Communist China and South Korea have nothing to do with the topic of Japan ridding itself of the anchor known as Article 9.

zichiJun. 27, 2014 - 11:22AM JST The right to assemble demonstrate and protest is an important one even if we don't agree with its meaning.

And I replied and added some facts about Japan's neighbors.

If what I posted aren't facts about Japan's neighbors please by all means correct me.

zichiJun. 27, 2014 - 08:38PM JST Like I said there are many countries which prevent their citizens from having freedoms?

Did I deny that? No, I didn't I just found that injecting irrelevant nations into a discussion like this is a bit off.

Have any of the nations you mentioned complained about what Japan is about to finally do?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Thunderbird2 Jun. 27, 2014 - 03:56PM JST To those protesting about the change to Article 9: German forces were deployed for the first time to Kosovo and Bosnia during the Balkans war, and then later as fully fledged combat troops to Afghanistan. Does the rest of the world think that the Bundeswehr will suddenly revert to the ways of the Wehrmacht and SS? No, of course not. German troops are a vital part of NATO and are one of the most technologically advanced countries in the Alliance. The JGSDF will not suddenly turn into the IJA.

In every bilateral meeting, including with British PM Cameron and French President Hollande, and especially with the head of NATO, Abe spoke expansively about Japan’s intension to join with other countries to “protect the global commons.” Abe publicly singled out China as a threat to Asian regional order who is seeking to “change the status quo by force” and solicited support for Japan’s claims in the Senkaku/Diaoyu dispute. His message and appeal fell largely flat. All European countries have assigned a high priority to strengthening commercial and political relations with China. None would challenge China over an issue as ambiguous and, to themselves, marginal, as Japan’s claim over the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands. Truth be told, the same applies to the U.S.

But the big problem for Abe is not just that “active pacifism” is not resonating abroad and it is not, including in most of Asia. The policy has mostly fallen flat domestically. Japan’s public is deeply ambivalent about, or opposed to, any role or activities for the SDF outside of Japan. My view is that Abe is losing public support. His “active pacifism” policy does not reflect Japanese public opinion and he will not be successful in changing that opinion. That most Japanese are concerned about their country’s relations with its most important neighbors, China and South Korea.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

JoeBigs: If you simple google, you will see the latest poll showing that 54% of Japanese are agaist amending the ninth article. I've seen other polls showing even larger disapproval but I'm sure you don't really care about that anyway. 2nd. YOU are the one who commented about the number of protesters and you even mention it again. If you actually lived in Tokyo, you would see how hard it is to go to a demonstration. The only places that's easy to gather (in large numbers) is performance arenas or attractions, simply parking a car is extremely challing and expensive. Not everyone is financially wealthy and can afford talking the time off, plus travel expenses. Since I showed you where to find poll information, can you respond to it? Also, can you show me the proof that Japan is under eminate threat of those communist you hate soo much. I don't defend communist, nor ANY other form of government from any country. Governments stopped working for the peaople, they have all become corporations. Only good individuals (from every country) have my total support.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Stuart haywardJun. 28, 2014 - 10:50AM JST JoeBigs: If you simple google, you will see the latest poll showing that 54% of Japanese are agaist amending the ninth article. I've seen other polls showing even larger disapproval but I'm sure you don't really care about that anyway.

In May 2013, 2000 people were polled from around the nation and 54% were wary of revising Article 9.

http://ajw.asahi.com/article/behind_news/politics/AJ201305020072

But, in July 2013 the LDP won a resounding victory in the Japanese House of Councillors election. If these polls were any indication of the sentiment of the Japanese people the LDP and Prime Minister Abe wouldn't be in power.

Next, speaking about polls, could you explain why Prime Minister Abe's approval rating is so high? Right now it is at 59%.

http://blogs.wsj.com/japanrealtime/2014/03/24/japan-supports-abe-but-not-all-his-policies/

Stuart haywardJun. 28, 2014 - 10:50AM JST 2nd. YOU are the one who commented about the number of protesters and you even mention it again.

If the people of Japan were behind these protesters then the streets would be filled by protesters, but they aren't. So, they don't have the support many here wish they had.

Stuart haywardJun. 28, 2014 - 10:50AM JST If you actually lived in Tokyo, you would see how hard it is to go to a demonstration.

I do live here in Tokyo and I have seen many protests marches. The only problems I have seen have been the traffic they sometimes cause.

Stuart haywardJun. 28, 2014 - 10:50AM JST The only places that's easy to gather (in large numbers) is performance arenas or attractions, simply parking a car is extremely challing and expensive. Not everyone is financially wealthy and can afford talking the time off, plus travel expenses.

http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/17/on-our-radar-nuclear-protest-in-tokyo-2/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/30/world/asia/thousands-in-tokyo-protest-the-restarting-of-a-nuclear-plant.html

http://www.greenpeace.org/international/en/multimedia/slideshows/Fukushima-Remembered-/Fukushima-Anniversary-Protest-in-Tokyo/

Protests happen all the time.

Stuart haywardJun. 28, 2014 - 10:50AM JST Since I showed you where to find poll information, can you respond to it?

Did above enjoy the read.

Stuart haywardJun. 28, 2014 - 10:50AM JST Also, can you show me the proof that Japan is under eminate threat of those communist you hate soo much. I don't defend communist, nor ANY other form of government from any country. Governments stopped working for the peaople, they have all become corporations. Only good individuals (from every country) have my total support.

Enjoy the read...

http://thediplomat.com/2014/02/chinas-military-trains-for-war-against-japan/

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/may/15/china-okinawa-dispute-japan-ryukyu

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/10662966/China-steps-up-propaganda-war-on-Japan.html

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/feb/19/inside-the-ring-china-readies-for-short-sharp-war-/?page=all

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

JoeBigs: I guess you don't know the difference of taking a poll (related to article nine) compared to the vote for LDP? You say that one, is the same as the other?? Or you simply like to use DEFLECTION as a reply to comments you disagree with. Thank you for the links but as you can see, even though the anti nuclear protest were soo large, Abe has gone against the people's wishes, similar to his actions with article nine. Lastly, your link shows NO FACTS that prove an eminent threat of attack by China.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Stuart haywardJun. 28, 2014 - 06:51PM JST JoeBigs: I guess you don't know the difference of taking a poll (related to article nine) compared to the vote for LDP? You say that one, is the same as the other??

No, you were using a poll as a bases for your argument that a majority of the Japanese people are against Abe's plan to change the Constitution and I was clearly pointing out Prime Minister Abe and his party are in power, so they must have the support of a majority of the Japanese people.

Stuart haywardJun. 28, 2014 - 06:51PM JST Or you simply like to use DEFLECTION as a reply to comments you disagree with.

I haven't been trying to divert this discussion away from the topic. What I have been doing is presenting facts and reason to disprove your idea that a majority of the Japanese people are against what Prime Minister Abe is doing.

You see, polls usually mean absolutely nothing since they normally poll a snippet of a population and then make it seem that this is what the whole nation thinks.

If the polls were correct Prime Minister Abe wouldn't be Prime Minister, but he is and his party has won the last few elections hands down.

If you want to prove that the polls are correct, please provide some facts rather than speculation and perception.

Stuart haywardJun. 28, 2014 - 06:51PM JST Thank you for the links but as you can see, even though the anti nuclear protest were soo large, Abe has gone against the people's wishes, similar to his actions with article nine. Lastly, your link shows NO FACTS that prove an eminent threat of attack by China.

Interesting, so when Communist China Trains for War Against Japan and lays claim to Okinawa you don't find that to be in anyway a fact? Very interesting......

Well, your opinions are your own and we must all live with what we say.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

JoeBigs: Well, I will agree with you that polls are not always an accurate reflection of public views, especially depending on how it's worded. But you asked for proof of my claim and polls are still the most excepted form of showing that. Abe won't allow a vote on Article nine, nor the nuclear issues. You seem to think because a politician is voted in, that ALL who voted for him approve of EVERY action he will EVER make. That's your logic?? Obama hasn't done a single thing to support the reasons I voted for him. Again, you twisted my comment around! I said EMANATE THREAT OF ATTACK, NOT just any country that has the ability to attack. Though you really sound like you would be pleased if we attacked China or NK, I'm sure you would be the last one to actually fight.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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