COVID-19 INFORMATION What you need to know about the coronavirus if you are living in Japan or planning a visit.
picture of the day

Okamoto's A-bomb mural

15 Comments

The late artist Taro Okamoto's largest work “Myth of Tomorrow" (Asu no shinwa) adorns a wall at Shibuya Mark City near JR Shibuya Station in Tokyo. The mural, which is 30 meters wide and 5.5 meters tall, symbolizes the moment of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima on Aug 6, 1945, and was created in Mexico City between 1968 and 1969. It had been missing until it was found in 2003 by Okamoto's wife in a yard for building materials in Mexico City. The restoration was completed in 2006 and the mural was transferred from the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, to Shibuya Mark City for permanent public exhibition. The mural is installed on the wall of a walk-through of the Keio Inokashira Line’s Shibuya Station and will have a guard during commuter hours to prevent vandals defacing it.

© Japan Today

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.


15 Comments
Login to comment

Taro Okamoto's prediction of the Fukushima disaster: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/the-atomic-artists/chimpom-art/

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sarge said:

What about the fire-bombing of civilians? Isn't that ghastly too? Keep in mind, all these civilians ( well, all the ones over the age of 18, anyway ) were supporting the militaristic government.

Yes Sarge the fire bombings of civilians in Yokohama, Kawasaki, Nagoya, Yokohama, Osaka and Tokyo were also ghastly; those are just the major cities where the U.S. torched Japanese civilians. From May to August , U.S. planes firebombed fifty-eight Japanese cities.

You posted a blanket statement that stated "all these civilians""were supporting." Did anyone poll them prior to their demise? How could you possible know such a thing? I think I will not "Keep in mind" your conjecture.

I like the mural. I think Japan has a right to be on the forefront of objecting to the use of nuclear weapons. I don't know where I stand on the U.S. dropping atom bombs on Japan. I used to stand behind the decision because I thought it saved lives and yadda, yadda, yadda. Now I have much more information including some that supports that many lives were saved by averting a ground war. Fortunately I don't have to "decide" whether it was right or wrong. I want to say as an American that I am sorry my country inflicted the civilian death toll on Japan that it did.

Art is best when it stirs emotions in people.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yang - What about the fire-bombing of civilians? Isn't that ghastly too? Keep in mind, all these civilians ( well, all the ones over the age of 18, anyway ) were supporting the militaristic government. There is no queston that the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, which this mural allegedly depicts, hastened the end of the war, saving countless lives on both sides. I hope nuclear weapons will never be used except to break up incoming asteroids.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Frankly I like it, you know just looking at it I would never have guessed it was about the Atomic Bombing, hey is it just me or does the skeleton in the center also kinda look like a dragon head? With the pelvis being the snout and the gaps between the chest bones looking like eyes. . .

0 ( +0 / -0 )

hey..i thought we are talking about preserving Taro Okamoto's invaluable art piece..wars are everywhere. We preserved them in history books. We can't change history..so let's make the best of world's future...:)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That is ghastly.

Good you get it becuase the atom bombing of civilians is... ghastly.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Sarge: they were ignoring it because, perhaps the photo was taken around the time people were busy commuting to their destinations. I was there last night and there were loads of people taking photos and videos of the mural....:)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is a painting by Taro Okamoto depiciting an abstract version of the A bomb explosion. The Late Artisit has a phenomonal museum on a park in Kawasaki.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That is ghastly. That is why most of the people in the photo are ignoring it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

see...Inokashira Line entrance is not just for discovery of Miss World...but also for historical piece like this...:) yay!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In the words of Keanu Reeves -- Whoa!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not my cup of tea, however, hanging it in such a public place is asking for trouble. Also note that it is only being guarded during "commuter hours," seems to me that sooner or later some pxssed salaryman who has missed the last train home won't be able to resist the temptation of adding is own little bit of "artistic license," whether that be straight-out graffiti or the remains of his dinner.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I like the painting and admire the artist's use of vivid pure primary colors. But this is similar to Picasso's Guernica--a huge mural depicting the horrors of war--and I wonder if people really want (or need) to see this every day on their morning commute (and the frequency of jumpers in Tokyo these days makes it even more ironic). Why in Shibuya and not in Hiroshima?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That is an awfully big painting to lose.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I don't get it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites