picture of the day

On a clear day...

18 Comments

Snow-covered Mt Fuji is seen behind Tokyo's skyscrapers on Thursday.

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18 Comments
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Great photo!!!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Nice photo. The illusion of depth creating largeness is a wonderful effect.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Is this real or photoshop?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

If it's not photoshop, it's a hell of a lens.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Nice photo! With that much zoom you really need the clear air. Very cool!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Anyone in Tokyo able to confirm this is real?

Is that the view today?

Moderator: Of course, it is real and was taken today.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Photo of the day is one thing this site does right.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Wow! Can anyone tell what part of Tokyo this picture was taken from? I don't remember ever seeing a view like that and I wish I had!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

looking west through the skyscraper district of Shinjuku

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Majestic photo.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There is no way that Mt. Fuji looks that big from Tokyo.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

Fantastic !

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Nice, but I prefer our "neighborhood" mountain Asamayama, which is finally covered in snow today. Not only is it much closer, but it makes for a good day-hike as well during all seasons.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

With the lens used here Fuji looks much closer than it really is.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Beautiful. I love how Tokyo gets those blue-sky days all through winter. Makes up for the summers...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

cute!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Farmboy, this is donne with a good amount of zoom. I am no expert in photography but it's to my understanding that if there are 2 very distant objects and they both seem small you can use a good zoom lens to bring them closer to your viewing spot and bot h of them will seem larger, that is why you can see Fuji san so big. One thing to keep in mind is the focal aperture, you will want a small aperture to get both objects in focus, that would translate to a big f number like f8.0 or higher, that would be my guess.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

SauloJpn,

Yes, the lens is the key. You won't see this with the naked eye. I'm not saying it isn't a beautiful picture, but the lens and perspective creates an illusion of proximity that just isn't there to this extent.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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