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So sorry

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Mitsubishi Motors Corp's Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Osamu Masuko, left, and Head of Research and Development Mitsuhiko Yamashita bow their heads to apologize over the company's mileage scandal at a news conference in Tokyo on Tuesday. The automaker had admitted that it manipulated data to make at least eight models look more fuel efficient than they actually were.

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Were there ever any charges in this case? Was there ever a law broken? Is this just a performance to give the impression something has been done? And meanwhile thing will go on as usual?

8

What else is new?

6

Were there ever any charges in this case? Was there ever a law broken? Is this just a performance to give the impression something has been done? And meanwhile thing will go on as usual?

No. Yes. Yes and Yes.

What else is new?

Zilch. Business as usual.

3

"Annnnnnnnd. That's a wrap."

"OK, let's get some noodles."

9

Usually they appear in a group of three while apologizing over scandals...this time TWO only? yes, cost cut measure.

1

This is getting old. No honour at Mitsubishi Motors, regardless of all the bowing. Disgraceful. (Wonder how disgraced VW is doing these days...)

3

It is nice they get up and bow about this. However what will be done? I do not think Japan should discontinue the tradition of the public apology. There is something to be said for that. However one thing Japan lacks, in many industries, is a viable 3rd Party verification system for things like this and for safety related issues.

I think these tests should be required to be performed by accredited 3rd Party testing laboratories, which are held accountable for the results when they come up for re-accreditation. One simple example is the Energy Star labeling requirements in the U.S. The EPA requires an accredited 3rd Party to certify the energy efficiency of the product to recognized standards. If a 3rd Party falsifies data, they lose their accreditation and their business. The system is not 100% fool proof but it works pretty well.

I think this type of system would work well to ensure this type of thing does not happen again.

What I would really like to see is these guys bowing and during the same media conference explain that they will have an independent accredited 3rd Party perform fuel efficiency testing and certify all data from here forward. In addition some damages should be paid to the consumer based on a calculation of fuel consumption used above and beyond claimed efficiency.

3

....that we got caught.

6

but we won't go to jail

4

So sorry

and so happy that Japan never indict head of big corp (exactly like politician), prosecutors are not made for us.

3

Meaningless as always. Actions speak louder than fake bows.

4

so sorry not sorry

1

The Japanese apology: devoid of meaning, and just a way to avoid charges.no wonder all companies cut corners, lie, and manipulate.

2

Yeah, more like "Sorry we got caught."

8

No doubt people will mock this, yet they overlook that in their home countries, you will NEVER see a CEO publicly apologizing with humility and genuine remorse.

-9

They are making excuses too. Apparently Mitsubishi carried out the fuel efficience tests multiple times, and rather than taking the average they chose the test instances that had the most favourable data. At this session, after bowing (rather briefly methinks) the chairman claimed that their selection of favourable data was "not in breach of the law". The government results showed fuel efficiency at up to 8.8% less than those published by Mitsubishi! You can see the (3.5s?) bow here at about 50 seconds in http://www.fnn-news.com/news/headlines/articles/CONN00334805.html

I used to have Mitsubishi light van which was utterly reliable, great to drive, and the fuel efficiency was fantastic. I never believe published fuel efficiency figures, which vary according to how you drive.

1

@timtak - yes that is interesting as well. I think it is another reason to require the use of 3rd Parties to perform testing and provide data for these claims. Also I agree with oldman13.....sure it is very easy to mock these apologies but in the U.S. we never see such a thing. Usually the CEO escapes with a greater than 10,000,000 dollar payout and proceeds to be on the board of directors of another major corporation.

I like the apology...but add some substance do it by telling everyone what they will do about it to prevent future recurrence.

2

Isn't this old news from back in April ?? Someone please clarify if I'm missing anything

0

there must be a great market for body double look-a-likes to make the obligatory bows of shame,,,

1

It's just a "Sorrimasen" - hybrid Japanese verb negative form - meaning I am not sorry.

0

we are sorry......we got caughtすみません.

2

No doubt people will mock this, yet they overlook that in their home countries, you will NEVER see a CEO publicly apologizing with humility and genuine remorse.

It's Mitsubishi, mate. They've had appalling scandals like this for decades and nothing has changed, absolutely nothing. They just bow, scrape and carry on until the next scandal gets exposed. It's a disgraceful company, utterly shameless. These performances are meaningless.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-18/mitsubishi-motors-scandal-was-an-accident-waiting-to-happen

4

Isn't this old news from back in April ?? Someone please clarify if I'm missing anything

From the caption:

at a news conference in Tokyo on Tuesday.

-6

If they're truly sorry, they can quit, give up their pensions, and offer full refund to all customers who have bought their products during the period in question.

0

Scandals surrounding Mitsubishi isn't a new thing. But apologies and bows seems a tactic they like to use to "fix" things, without actually fixing anything. A very similar governmental policy....

1

I hate the "were sorry we were caught" attitude of Japan. It's not honorable at all and for a country that says that is a core value it really stinks. The JP government needs to punish CEO's, board members, remove tax benefits and fine these companies. It wont happen because they all belong to the same boy's club.

1

I wish more people would accept responsibility. Did either of them actually have hand in this? Justice?

0

Honesty is often difficult, but the consequences for dishonesty can eat right through you, Unfortunately the world is an easier place to be dishonest and it takes effort to be honest. Being honest with yourself and others at all times means choosing not to lie, steal, cheat, or deceive in anyway. When you are honest, you build strength of character and have peace of mind and self-respect. Dishonesty harms you and harms others as well and also damages relationships. Integrity means thinking and dong what is right at all times, no what the consequences. Sadly some people never learn the importance of honesty. Maybe one day such people might experience the felling of peace and freedom in their heart that only comes from being honest for they have nothing to hide anymore.

0

Actually the picture was manipulated to make them appear to bow lower than they are by tilting the table and the wall. It's adjustable. Like seats.

0

After seeing too many of these photos, I've gotten the impression that the bowing is analogous to the English "Mistakes were made"; or "we're sorry if you were offended. "

0

It's fraud. As such, those who knew about it should be arrested and tried in court.

It shouldn't matter that it's Mitsubishi Corp., or that they've bowed, or that it's a 'victimless crime', or that 'everyone else has been doing it'. It's fraud.

0

I agree that Japan should keep the public apology tradition, but it should be done from their prison cells. That would have some meaning. Compensation for their defrauded customers should be a given.

1

Who did not cheat? Just depends on their lawyers.

GM, Chevrolet, Suzuki, Mitsubishi, VW etc.

A lot of US manufactures were smart tho. They have a nice clause saying that their info might contain typos. And when being charged, "ups. That's a typo sorry :-) "

1

WOW bowing and making the "L" means liar. Oh we got caught well at least we tried!!!

-1

We are sorry that you were upset about this.

1

yet they overlook that in their home countries, you will NEVER see a CEO publicly apologizing with humility and genuine remorse.

Don't think anyone has ever seen a Japanese CEO apologising with humility and GENUINE remorse either. These fake performances don't really fly with nyone in possession of a functioning brain. However, we have seen CEO,s in other countries often facing criminal charges for their misdeeds....yet in the good ole Japan?....

0

Oldman_13: "will NEVER see a CEO publicly apologizing with humility and genuine remorse."

In the other countries you see them go to prison or even executed. In Japan the get protection and a pay raise. You think this apology is honorable? Let's see him fall on a sword then talk about it.

0

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