picture of the day

Tiger shark

23 Comments

A tiger shark swims in Osaka's Kaiyukan Aquarium.

© Japan Today

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.


23 Comments
Login to comment

So beautiful (to gaze at through glass!)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wonder how larger it is?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

oishisou!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nice, but should that shark be swimming with the other fish?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wouldn't the shark eat the other fish?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wouldn't the shark eat the other fish?

Of course. Some aquariums don't mix them because patrons don't want to watch sharks devour other fish, particularly if there's a struggle. But it's also possible this one was fed in advance.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Shark seems to not eat others as long as it's well fed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Tiger sharks hunt mainly at night. I imagine they put the other expensive fish in a safe place before they turn the lights out. Maybe the sharks are lazy, too - they'll opt to eat what they're given instead of wasting energy chasing after stuff.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

one of my favorite aquariums in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They should throw timeon in there to find out if the tigershark can say... this tastes like crap.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This photo is useless without a human diver to show the size of the shark.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No, I don't volunteer to be the diver!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sarge - I put you in there. It may hug and smooch you and say "I love you".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

kwatt - Ha ha ha! I'm a dead man!

Did you know sharks can read?

Swimmer being attacked by shark: Help!

Lifeguard reading the latest Harry Potter novel: Not now! I'm on page 86 where Harry is about to...

Shark: Shut up! I haven't got to page 86 yet!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sarge - nice joke, isn't it. Give you 80 points for that.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Best Swimming Sharkist?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Having been there the shart is abot 12 feet long. There are no other fish in the tank except for feeding time. The Tiger Sharks favorite meal is Sea Turtle. One other thing this is picture of my ex. Except this shark has a nicer disposition.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sea turtles are quite large, they can weigh as much as 100 pounds. They are beautiful to watch as they glide through the water using long flippers which is probably what attracts sharks, who are as sensitive to motion as snakes.

It certainly wouldn't be pleasant to watch a tiger shark do in a sea turtle, and hence the aquarium ensures it takes place after hours.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Betzee -

Aren't all species of sea turtle threatened or endangered? I very much doubt the aquarium is letting its tiger shark 'do in' any sea turtles.

Not even as a special midnight snack treat.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Aren't all species of sea turtle threatened or endangered? I very much doubt the aquarium is letting its tiger shark 'do in' any sea turtles.

They must have made it clear the shark will eat what it's served.

Not even as a special midnight snack treat.

Not even on its birthday, if it hasn't eaten any fish in front of patrons all year?

I live not too far from a beach which has become home to a colony of elephant seals. It's heartbreaking when the pups get separated from their mothers, usually during storms, because they starve to death. After being weaned they have to teach themselves to swim at which point they become vulnerable to sharks, but at least nobody sees it!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

2009 best Sharkist

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"sharks, who are as sensitive to motion as snakes"

Betzee, you are correct about sharks being sensitive to motion. They also detect electromagnetic fields very well, such as those put out by muscular activity. However, snakes lack these abilities. Their tongue (sharp sense of smell) serves as their "eyes" to the world, and some also detect heat, although I note from experience that you can fool a gartersnake by moving your little finger in such a way as to resemble a worm, and it will attempt to eat you, pinky first. So they have some sensitivity to motion, but it is typically secondary or tertiary.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Betzee, you are correct about sharks being sensitive to motion.

That insight came from watching Jaws again.

Their tongue (sharp sense of smell) serves as their "eyes" to the world,

When they are looking for food. But if they feel threatened snakes, which are deaf, rely on a sense of motion or perhaps vibration (though it may not be as acute as that of sharks) to ascertain what the suspected predator will do.

Sooo, in dealing with both sharks and poisonous snakes, remain still (which is exactly the opposite of the way most humans react).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites