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Wedding march

16 Comments

A newlywed couple, at the back, are escorted by Shinto priests and maidens following their wedding rite at Meiji shrine in Tokyo.

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16 Comments
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One of the most beautiful ways of learning about a culture is, if you get the chance, to watch a traditional wedding and reception. awesome!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Will attend my cousin-in-law's in Kyoto on Saturday. First traditional one for me, looking forward to it.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

While I am not a follower of Shinto or Buddhism I have to say that it comes across as more authentic than these superficial attempts to copy western wedding ceremonies in hotel "chapels"

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Traditional wedding especially those held at a Shinto shrine are way too expensive.

Apparently not for my cousin-in-law. Have no idea if she's well off, but do know she works hard, so good on her. Hubbie-to-be seems to be 2-in-C, though he no slouch either.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

At a shrine, at a western style chapel, or in your backyard, people can get married wherever they want. There's not anything superficial about where they choose to get married as long as the love's authentic.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I've photographed several at Meiji Shrine, and regardless of cost to whoever, it's an honour to capture the beauty of their tradition.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

My marriage at my local shrine sounds nothing like zichi's description. No gifts to guests nor any attendance fees requested - though we had some generous gifts. A small gathering of loved friends and family. We didn't have a photographer either.

It was the second marriage for both of us and we were mostly concerned with expressing our commitment to each other and sharing a happy event with those who are most important to us.

It was not very expensive and everyone concerned seemed to enjoy it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

When I visited the Meiji Shrine, we stopped at a bridal kimono on display and our tour guide said the rental of such a kimono for four hours costs roughly US$4,000 and the outright purchase of the kimono would run roughly US$40,000.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My marriage at my local shrine sounds nothing like zichi's description. No gifts to guests nor any attendance fees requested - though we had some generous gifts.

Zichi's description was of the reception, not the ceremony at the shrine (with the exception of the quote I'll get to below). And his description is pretty standard. I've (unfortunately) been invited to a couple dozen weddings in this country, and for the most part they were in line with his description.

The cost of the reception in Tokyo will be ¥50,000 to ¥100,000 per guest. A little less in the sticks, ¥20,000 to ¥50,000.

Actually, for single guests, it's 30,000, for couples it's 50,000, and for family members it starts at 50,000 and goes up, depending on the family member. The first digit is supposed to be an odd number, as even numbers can be split, inferring a split between the new couple. And for the uninitiated, don't think you can get by with a small amount, with no one noticing - they write down the amount that each person brings.

If the wedding is held at a Shinto shrine will involve a large donation to the shrine.

We got married at the major shrine in my wife's hometown area, and it was only 50,000 yen. I actually thought it was quite reasonable.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Gee, by what you're saying, it's quite a headache to be invited to a wedding like this. Not to mention the protocols and etiquette, which must be very strict.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It was explained to us on our tour that because the costs for the wedding are so high, that is why cash is the only gift preferred as the bills for the wedding are onerous.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Strangerland The costs I quoted for the reception are not the amounts paid by the guests. They are the costs to the wedding couple or whoever is footing the bill to hold the reception.

Ahh, in that case your numbers sound correct to me.

Gee, by what you're saying, it's quite a headache to be invited to a wedding like this. Not to mention the protocols and etiquette, which must be very strict.

Other than the financial burden of being invited, they are fun. Good food, drink all you want, everyone happy, and you go home with a bag of presents.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

all the best !!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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