politics

146 Japanese lawmakers visit Yasukuni shrine

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By Harumi Ozawa

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Obama can't catch a break, even with one of the USA's three most important geopolitical allies. Unfortunately, they'll get away with it, too, since right now the US needs to have Japan remain firmly in the sphere of the USA.

The trump card for the United States will always be security, but since the cost of losing the bases in Japan is so high the USA will never abandon Japan to China and Russia.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Do these guys work?

23 ( +29 / -6 )

God forbid the Japanese from doing something in their own damn country! D:

-19 ( +13 / -32 )

Here we go again.

12 ( +18 / -6 )

God forbid the Japanese from doing something in their own damn country! D:

They most definitely have the right to do it. Same as any country most definitely has the right to complain about it. If the Japanese don't like the complaints, then the only option is to stop going. If they don't want to stop going, then there will be complaints, whether the Japanese like it or not.

20 ( +25 / -5 )

They most definitely have the right to do it. Same as any country most definitely has the right to complain about it. If the Japanese don't like the complaints, then the only option is to stop going. If they don't want to stop going, then there will be complaints, whether the Japanese like it or not.

Right. So what would give myself, you or anyone else the right to complain about what a citizen does in their country? Will some complete stranger visiting a shrine effect your everyday life?

-9 ( +10 / -19 )

They most definitely have the right to do it

The Government of Japan and the Government of the People's Republic of China agree to establish relations of perpetual peace and friendship between the two countries on the basis of the principles of mutual respect for sovereignty and territorial integrity, mutual non-aggression, non-interference in each other's internal affairs, equality and mutual benefit and peaceful co-existence.
-1 ( +16 / -17 )

@KariHaruka,

Of course its ok but that doesnt mean it`s always ok. But please try to be subjective sometimes and not side with Japanese things/issues simply because you are Japanese. Not being subjective shows narrow mindedness and ignorance.

1 ( +11 / -10 )

Of course its ok but that doesnt mean it`s always ok. But please try to be subjective sometimes and not side with Japanese things/issues simply because you are Japanese. Not being subjective shows narrow mindedness and ignorance.

I'm Finnish... However I've visited the Yasukuni Shrine and I found it to be a very interesting shrine. I've never agreed with the war criminals being enshrined along with the millions of other names however that shouldn't stop anyone from visiting the shrine to honour those 2million + excluding the war criminals. Now if it was a matter of fact that the leaders were visiting the shrine for the war criminals then fair enough I'd be in agreement but as it isn't then I'm siding with the Japanese who have the right to go where they like in their own country.

1 ( +15 / -14 )

pointofview

I think you mean objective

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Not surprised by this. It happens every year around this time. They've got every right to do it, and they SHOULD honor Japan's war dead. 2.5million peopel gave their life for Japan and they deserve respect for their sacrifice regardless of whether Japan started the war or not.

That said, its in the best interests of the nation to just get rid of the 14 war criminals from the shrine. So I wish they'd just do that. That wouldn't satiate China or South Korea who'll see it as Japan returning to militarism regardless, but at least it'll be more difficult to slam Japan in the press.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

@KariHaruka,

It`s totally fine to complain or comment on another countries issues. If you live there and pay the taxes even more so. Changing such things however is a little more difficult.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Hmmm - and the story beneath this one is:

Obama, Abe to address negative images at summit

I wonder if this compulsion to fuel the fires of regional hostility will count as a "negative image"? Or will everything be everyone else's fault, as usual?

1 ( +6 / -5 )

KariHaruka: "God forbid the Japanese from doing something in their own damn country! D:"

It'd be more correct if you changed it to "God forbid the Japanese from doing something FOR their own damn country!", since they know full well before going in this will hurt the nation in terms of ties with others. Of course they have the right to go, but like I said they know full well how China and South Korea will react, so any good leader/lawmaker would stay away out of respect for international relations. That, or they would at least not go en masse like this and in their official capacities.

9 ( +19 / -10 )

Jingoism at its worst.

8 ( +14 / -7 )

good job by our dietmen. it is sure to drive the neighbours wild!

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Right. So what would give myself, you or anyone else the right to complain about what a citizen does in their country?

The right to freedom of speech of course.

Of course the complainer has to deal with the repercussions of their complaints as well. If they alienate the person/group they are complaining about, that person/group may choose to cut off interaction with the complainer. Depending on the circumstances, this could lead to financial hardship. In other words, the more China exercises their right to complain, the more likely that Japanese companies will start to pull out of China. As Japan is a huge source of investment in China, this could affect them economically in a significant way. It also will affect Japan I'm a serious way, due to the costs of restructuring away from China.

Short answer - Japanese officials have every right to visit Yasikuni. Chinese officials have every right to complain. Both sides have no choice but to deal with the repercussions of their actions.

Will some complete stranger visiting a shrine effect your everyday life?

Maybe. If the Japanese don't repent on their past wrongs, there is a strong possibility of repeating them. If they repeat them, you can guarantee that it will affect the day to day lives of the Chinese. And I, living in Japan, will be affected by that as well.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Uh-oh!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Just remove the war criminals, review the dodgy displays and tell the full story. ...never happen. Politicians are ashamed of their grandfathers actions and need to portray them as heroes. The fact that no country views their liberation by Japan as a positive thing has not even entered these dim wits heads.

9 ( +13 / -5 )

That, and the accompanying museum—which paints Japan as a frustrated liberator of Asia and victim of World War II.

Yeh, good luck with that. As an American I take offense at this, let alone the Chinese and Koreans. I hope Obama tells Abe EXACTLY what he needs to hear, and does not mince any words, which, IMO, would simply boil down to "GROW UP JAPAN".

10 ( +14 / -4 )

146 leaders just put their hands up as being incompetent and unworthy of their position.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

Two things are offend:

1 - among the dead are war criminals, yet they call them "gods" and WORSHIP them; 2 - the politicians are improperly mixing politics with religion, seeking to revive the fanatical state-shinto cult.
-1 ( +8 / -9 )

More Jingoistic neighborhood jiji playing politics. More proof that Japan's ruling class is pathetically out of touch with their own people, and the modern world in general.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

From the Yasukuni website:

"The spirits of these deceased are the object of worship at Yasukuni Shrine. Therefore, the shrine has completely different nature from that of tombs where bodies or bones of fallen soldiers are buried." (http://www.yasukuni.or.jp/english/about/history.html)

So even the shrine admits that it is completely different from a normal national cemetery ... So why do people keep saying it ?!?

10 ( +11 / -1 )

@pointofview "Do these guys work?"

An excellent question! As they went as private citizens, surely they did it on their own time and (this is the kicker) in their own private vehicles, not driven in a government-issued car, not using their government travel expense money.... Seriously, has anyone ever heard how they get there? If they are using one yen of public money, they are not going as private citizens....

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Is there any special occasion or can you just pop into the shrine any time you feel like paying your respects to war criminals?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Group tour, may give little boost to shrinking economy.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Neither the words "gods" nor "worship" properly convey the situation to the uneducated Western mind correctly, however, just as with redemption in Christian, soul can be purified in Shintoism. It is a somewhat poor and misleading translation of "kami-sama" what is going on. It does not mean any unfortunate acts they might have carried out are being rewarded, highly regarded or even sanctioned. They are beside the point.

The souls are purified. "Helpful family spirits" might be a better translation. There's

As to the status of "war criminal", I doubt most individuals banding about the term even studied one single case to decide for themselves if the individual carried out a criminal act or not. Many were clearly not. It was a piece of theatre.

The Tribunal, the re-writing of the constitution and the re-engineering of society were most just done for America's political and economic ambitions in the region, and not any high minded moral reason. Much of what happened was just to break and bow the Japanese spirit in order that Japan would not continue to rise to become a challenge to American ambitions in Asia.

As to you point 2, it is a bizarrely idiotic suggestion.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

"146 Japanese lawmakers visit Yasukuni shrine" to worship the deceased, increase that type of worship, evn in your homes.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why yasukuni shrine gets the most spotlight, don't they have many other shrines they can visit?

As if Yasukuni shrine is the only shrine left.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

One hundred and forty-six is barely 20% of the total number of parliametarians.

So about 80% decided they had better things to do.

Good news : )

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Of course these people, as "private citizens", have the freedom to do as they please, but they should not complain if others ostracise them afterwards. And if they cannot understand why others might complain they are certainly too stupid to be running the country.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Most people in S.Korea, Singapore and China don't dislike the Japanese any more when they glance past this headline in their daily Internet-news scan.

Political posturing/wag-the-dog and media exaggeration to increase sales is what is happening here.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

The most dangerous thing in Japan is its own government...

6 ( +10 / -4 )

MGigante,

That said, its in the best interests of the nation to just get rid of the 14 war criminals from the shrine. So I wish they'd just do that. That wouldn't satiate China or South Korea who'll see it as Japan returning to militarism regardless, but at least it'll be more difficult to slam Japan in the press.

Unfortunately, they can't be removed. When they added the war criminals it was like adding a few very small parts to a very big whole. The way I had it explained to me was that the souls of the enshrined are like an ocean - trying to remove a few specific ones would be like adding a few drops of water to the ocean, then trying to remove only those drops.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Go for it! Shrines are beautiful and should be enjoyed often. Most people don't take enough time to honor deceased people. It's good to see these guys haven't lost their faith.

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

Jingoism at its worst.

i fail to see how this is being "hostile" to other countries. it's only been in recent years that china and SK have made visting yasukuni an act akin to glorifying hitler. these visits do nothing of the sort except to honor people who served their country, rightfully or wrongfully.

-8 ( +4 / -13 )

'I renew my faith in peace so these tragedies will never be repeated'.

Nice sentiment. But given the dynamics of the situation one wonders if Yasukuni is really the best place to do that. Reaffirming peace at a war shrine? Sure it is Japanese internal affairs,,,

But it is also a glorification of WWII agression on the part of Japan. Japan made many bad choices during that time that nearly resulted in its total annihilation. Nobody forced Japan to act on those choices.regardless of the narrative that has taken 70 years to emerge now that US influence is not as strong as it used to be.

3 ( +7 / -3 )

**“The souls revered here are the people who lost their lives purely for the sake of the country.”

If he said something like, "The souls revered here were the people whose lives were sacrificed purely for misguided nationalist reasons."- there wouldn`t be a problem.

But he would never say that, so there is.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I've been to Yasukuni, on August 15. If you go, I recommend you go on that day, for maximum entertainment.

That said, while there are a lot of really unreasonable people promoting their views, it is reasonable that freedom of speech be protected and that Japan have one place to go and offer thanks to its soldiers (and dogs, and horses -- there are monuments to animals that died in service of the war, too, there).

0 ( +6 / -7 )

it is reasonable that freedom of speech be protected and that Japan have one place to go and offer thanks to its soldiers

Freedom of speech already is protected and the Japanese do have one place to go. There is nothing stopping them from visiting Yasukuni.

But as I said earlier in this thread, freedom of speech also gives anyone else the right to complain about it.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

StrangerlandApr. 22, 2014 - 03:58PM JST

But as I said earlier in this thread, freedom of speech also gives anyone else the right to complain about it.

As soon as people start complaining about the religion of someone else, we have ugly and tragic consequences.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Taxes go up, Japan gets hated even more in Asian, these idiots pissed off their neighbours and the US and what does the public do?Nada.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Every country got right to do for own country so outsider should not complain.

-7 ( +5 / -12 )

Nearly 150 Japanese lawmakers paid homage at the Yasukuni war shrine on Tuesday,

I hope the Western media stop this little game of name changing. It is Yasukuni shrine, not Yasukuni war shrine.

Shame on them. Do we live in an Orwellian world?

-4 ( +6 / -11 )

@ Mari Tokura; Personally i care not for this matter however your two points raise problems to me. You say "every country". Japan is a country with 120 million residents, they will all not universally agree on every matter.

"Outsider" is a poor word to use. We live in an international world with business ties and trade important to all first world countries. In the 21st Century how leaders behave is under scrutiny 24 hours a day and there is a need to make careful decisions in delicate matters.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

@falseflagsteve;Outsider may not be suitable for this topic. However, speaking in terms of historical, all countries have a bad and a good part. the leaders of every countries got right to do for own country unless leaders does the same mistake again like war2.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

As soon as people start complaining about the religion of someone else, we have ugly and tragic consequences.

So you would prefer to suppress free speech?

I hope the Western media stop this little game of name changing. It is Yasukuni shrine, not Yasukuni war shrine.

Both are accurate descriptions.

1 ( +5 / -3 )

@Loki it's that you won't read anything about the other shrines since they don't cause the hype that the media wants.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

My point is they can visit other shrines. By visiting other shrines they can still uphold their tradition without angering their neighbors. Isn't that a better alternative?

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Loki HerringApr. 22, 2014 - 07:21PM JST

My point is they can visit other shrines

Oh, really. And who is to decide which shrine or church is fine and which shrine or church is not allowed? Do not tell me Chinese Communist Party has the authority to decide which shrine or church Japanese are allowed to visit in Japan.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Every country got right to do for own country so outsider should not complain.

Great, so will Japan stop crying about the comfort women statues in the US as the American Koreans have a right to do what they like?

8 ( +13 / -5 )

It's funny how Japanese trolls the Chinese and Koreans. I bet they are going to ask some extra money from Japanese gov.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Let's face it, this is the face of Japan. This is a country that is deeply conservative and values tradition over anything else. Have you ever questioned why they do this or that in this country and they simply say, "Because it has been this way for years." The school uniforms haven't changed in 100 years. They are stuck in the 19th century and still think other "slave" countries are inferior to Japan.

And, of course, the Japanese never did anything wrong. They always have someone else to blame. We were "forced" into WWII by the US "aggression", we "forced" to "advance" into China, and we were "forced" to annex Korea and it was "legal", etc. Just visit the Yasukuni Shrine museum for more information about this "history".

0 ( +8 / -8 )

yeah a show of force en mass to President Obama deliberately.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Probably 146 lawmakers are showing off that Japan is not a puppet country of USA. There is no traffic jam report so I guess they did not line up cars to visit Yasukuni, Used Japanese Govt owned Tetsudo in Tokyo? Shinkansen is more comfortable and entire 146 can ride together.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Another way to think Japanese politicians’ acts of honoring war dead in the controversial Yasukuni war shrine would be to parallel them with kamikaze pilots in ww2. Both of these two groups are fueled by defiance and blindfolded nationalism.

For Japanese to these days, kamikaze pilots are still portrayed as courageous and honorable heroes, but to the rest of the world, those poor soldiers were merely victims/fools who were brainwashed by Japan’s heinous war criminals.

The interesting thing is that 70 years later, kamikaze pilots were gone, but the war-time evil spirits sill remain and roam free in Japan’s political landscapes.

Sad, shame or scary, take your pick.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

My Dad was an American WWII vet, and I had no problem going there a couple times to pray. Rest in peace.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

“When a minister visits the shrine personally, it is a matter of an individual’s freedom of faith. The government should not step into it,” he said"

Individuals freedom of faith? Sounds more like group pressure and conformity to me. One member goes, all must go. Could you imagine one of them sitting out on this and being labeled a traitor?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

“The souls revered here are the people who lost their lives purely for the sake of the country.”

such lawmakers clearly only have a feeling for their former leaders who kill and murder..clearly no feeling for those who died under the Japanese imperial army..sorry if i am wrong..

1 ( +4 / -3 )

People that have been prosecuted as a leader the Pacific War general public, only 14 people are sleeping and rest of 2.47 million people are Japanese normal citizens at yasukuni shrine. Perhaps the issue of Yasukuni Shrine can be divided into three major.

1:Symbol of the war of aggression 2:The violation of the separation of church and state 3:Overseas criticized (China, South Korea, United States of America)

Japanese war of World War II's that whether or not a war of aggression is, there is a variety of opinion, but in fact,Japan lost the war. and it is said that the criticism in various ways. if Japan had won, then, there was no criticism from abroad that it is a symbol of aggressive war. There is a thought who was the unfortunate death, that have to cordially buried for war dead in Japan. it also serves as a memorial, honoring, the meaning of the memorial. Yasukuni Shrine in the sense that to honor those who commemorate the people who have died for Japan and pray for peace in Japan.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

@Sir Edgar...

Let's face it, this is the face of Japan. This is a country that is deeply conservative and values tradition over anything else. Have you ever questioned why they do this or that in this country and they simply say, "Because it has been this way for years." The school uniforms haven't changed in 100 years. They are stuck in the 19th century and still think other "slave" countries are inferior to Japan.

That's a pretty narrow minded remark, matey. So you've never seen the school uniforms made up of tartan skirts or smart trousers and blazers for both genders? Think you've got a chip on your shoulder.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

.[4] War criminals prosecuted by the International Military Tribunal for the Far East were initially excluded from enshrinement after the war.[4] Government authorities began considering their enshrinement, along with providing veterans' benefits to their survivors, following the signature of the Treaty of San Francisco in 1951, and in 1954 directed some local memorial shrines to accept the enshrinement of war criminals from their area.[19] No convicted war criminals were enshrined at Yasukuni until after the parole of the last remaining incarcerated war criminals in 1958. The Health and Welfare Ministry began forwarding information on Class B and Class C war criminals (those not involved in the planning, preparation, initiation, or waging of the war) to Yasukuni Shrine in 1959, and these individuals were gradually enshrined between 1959 and 1967, often without permission from surviving family members.[4][19] Information on the fourteen most prominent Class A war criminals, which included the prime ministers and top generals from the war era, was forwarded to the shrine in 1966, and the shrine passed a resolution to enshrine these individuals in 1970. The timing for their enshrinement was left to the discretion of head priest Fujimaro Tsukuba, who delayed the enshrinement through his death in March 1978. His successor Nagayoshi Matsudaira, who rejected the Tokyo war crimes tribunal's verdicts, enshrined the Class A war criminals in a secret ceremony in 1978.[4] Emperor Hirohito, who visited the shrine as recently as 1975, was privately displeased with the action, and subsequently refused to visit the shrine.

wish to know more? search Wikipedia now!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Probably 146 lawmakers are showing off that Japan is not a puppet country of USA

This is Yasukuni's Annual Spring Festival, Reitaisai, on April 21-23. They are doing this every year. A very important event.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

The Wikipedia is not a reliable source of information in this area. It's overrun with racist obsessive activists and their agendas, and I dare say governmentally sponsored ones too.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Guys shouting out at them, do you even know what they are saying and thinking when they go there? NO.

Has it ever crossed your mind that they might be simply remembering their lives and apologizing for the crimes they committed?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

. His successor Nagayoshi Matsudaira, who rejected the Tokyo war crimes tribunal's verdicts, enshrined the Class A war criminals in a secret ceremony in 1978.[4] Emperor Hirohito, who visited the shrine as recently as 1975, was privately displeased with the action, and subsequently refused to visit the shrine.

well even the Emperor wish not to be involved in this mess.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

well even the Emperor wish not to be involved in this mess.

And as usual, your wiki entry does not offer a reason for Emperor's decision for it's completely different from the CCP's "reasons".

But let's go further. The enshrinement of Class A became public knowledge in 1979 and there have been total of 21 visits by Japanese Prime Ministers and not a sound of complaint from the Chinese counterparts. Therefore, this is classic case of Chinese government making an issue out of "internal affairs" which they agreed not to "interfere".

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Japan's politicians are free to worship war criminal gods if they want to. But others are free to criticize and condemn them for it. And if that's inappropriate meddling in Japan's internal affairs, then Japan should stop inappropriately meddling in the internal affairs of American cities that erect memorials to Japan's wartime sex slaves.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Maybe. If the Japanese don't repent on their past wrongs, there is a strong possibility of repeating them. If they repeat them, you can guarantee that it will affect the day to day lives of the Chinese. And I, living in Japan, will be affected by that as well.

Two totally off the wall "if" scenario equating a false premise of "going to Yasukuni"="don't repent on their past wrongs".

Close to 70 visits by Japanese Prime Ministers after 1945 and not a single foreign civilian died at the hands of the JSDF for nearly 70 years. Sigh.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Let's just find another home for the bones of the 14 war criminals, please. The souls are long gone anyway...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@milaneseAPR. 23, 2014 - 12:30AM JST Let's just find another home for the bones of the 14 war lease

.;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

????? bones ?????

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Prime ministers Ohira Masayoshi and Suzuki Kantaro paid tribute at Yasukuni after the Class-A enshrinement became public, in 1979 and 1982 respectively. But it was Nakasone’s visit that captured international attention. In contrast to his predecessors, Nakasone signed the guest register as Prime Minister Nakasone Yasuhiro, and made an offering of flowers purchased with public funds. Article 20 of the Japanese Constitution, which guarantees freedom of religion, forbids the state and its organs from participating in religious activity. Article 89 forbids public support for religious institutions. Nakasone had violated both: Article 20 by the visit, and Article 89 by making an offering using public funds.

It wasn’t until the early 1980s, when then-Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone made an official visit and bowed before the spirits of the war criminals, when China grew angry and started to question Japan’s interpretation of its war responsibility.

these are two answers you are asking for,

both of them can also be used to explain the fears why these actions are seen as attempts to legitimize Japan's past militarism.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Let's just find another home for the bones of the 14 war criminals, please. The souls are long gone anyway...

Their are no bones or ashes in Yasukuni.

The co-mingled ashes of the 7 executed are housed here.

http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%AE%89%E5%9B%BD%E4%B8%83%E5%A3%AB%E5%BB%9F

The other 7, who died during the incarceration, their ashes are housed in their own family grave.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@milaneseAPR. 23, 2014 - 12:30AM JST Let's just find another home for the bones of the 14 war .;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

If you want to be active in Yasukuni related article, I suggest that you read Yasukuni in Wikipedia thoroughly. The English version does not have as good as Japanese language version but you will know that there is no grave there.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

these are two answers you are asking for,

They're not. The frist paragraph is purely a "domestic" matter which touches on the unconstitutionality. Funny how these people that files these lawsuits don't do a thing when lawmakers visit Ise Jingu or Meiji, or any other Shinto rituals. The second part has been done by prior PM's and bowed and clapped their hands before the "spirits of all war dead".

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Ever since diplomatic relations were established in 1972, China has maintained that only a handful of militarist leaders were responsible for the war and that the general public should not be held accountable. That is why China started to criticize Yasukuni for enshrining them after Nakasone’s official visit.

as my own explanation is Nakasone actions sure alarmed the CPC about Japan gov intentions

because

. In contrast to his predecessors, Nakasone signed the guest register as Prime Minister Nakasone Yasuhiro, and made an offering of flowers purchased with public funds. Article 20 of the Japanese Constitution, which guarantees freedom of religion, forbids the state and its organs from participating in religious activity. Article 89 forbids public support for religious institutions. Nakasone had violated both: Article 20 by the visit, and Article 89 by making an offering using public funds.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

as my own explanation is Nakasone actions sure alarmed the CPC about Japan gov intentions

Except for the inconvenient fact that predecessors have also visited on an "official" basis.

http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%B2%A9%E6%89%8B%E7%9C%8C%E9%9D%96%E5%9B%BD%E7%A5%9E%E7%A4%BE%E8%A8%B4%E8%A8%9F

Let's not forget another inconvenient fact that CPC only went against PM's visits. Now she has changed her goal post once again, and now she is against common "lawmakers".

There is no "alarm" by the CPC about Japanese government intentions. It's simply a card used by them to detract attention away from their own past misconducts and failures in their history. Frankly, it's over leveraged so I suggest they come up with something else.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

yeah you practically ignore this

. In contrast to his predecessors, Nakasone signed the guest register as Prime Minister Nakasone Yasuhiro, and made an offering of flowers purchased with public funds. Article 20 of the Japanese Constitution, which guarantees freedom of religion, forbids the state and its organs from participating in religious activity. Article 89 forbids public support for religious institutions. Nakasone had violated both: Article 20 by the visit, and Article 89 by making an offering using public funds.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

yeah you practically ignore this

No I didn't. It deals with PM's visit being construed as "unconstituttional". Furthermore, this is strictly a domestic matter.

You added nothing.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

China's official Xinhua news agency called the MP's visit a new act of provocation.

South Korea's Foreign Affairs Ministry said on Tuesday that Japan was "romanticizing" its past military aggression, "We think it is meaningless for them to talk about the future to neighboring nations when they are paying tribute to such a place".

There is no compromise, if it's not one thing, it's another, surely Obama must understand this.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

nigelboy Apr. 23, 2014 - 12:03AM JST The enshrinement of Class A became public knowledge in 1979 and there have been total of 21 visits by Japanese Prime Ministers and not a sound of complaint from the Chinese counterparts. Therefore, this is classic case of Chinese government making an issue out of "internal affairs" which they agreed not to "interfere".

Not a sound of complaint? Yasukuni visits by Japanese PM were politicized in the early 80's when China protested the enshrinement of the Class A war criminals. Japanese officials at that time avoided escalating tensions with China and SK. while allowing for conservative ministers to visit the shrine in a private capacity. However, PM Nakasone suspended his visit after 1985 because of his respect for China’s leader Hu Yaobang. After Nakasone, moderate conservative and liberal PM's avoided Yasukuni visits, even in their private capacity. Only Hashimoto visited the Yasukuni once in the 1990's. His plan to visit the shrine a second time was cancelled in response to Chinese criticism. Japan’s domestic politics demanded a cautious approach regarding China’s and South Korea’s criticism and constrained the Yasukuni visits.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Not a sound of complaint?

sfjp330,

Yep. Not a single complaint until the last 1985 visit by Nakasone. Please provide evidence of this China protest from April 21, 1979- April 22, 1985 encompassing 20 visits by Japanese PM's.

And again, stop copy/pasting other people's work and passing it off as your own.

<http://www.eastasiaforum.org/2014/01/24/abes-yasukuni-visit-the-view-from-japan/

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

April 21 - 23: Shunki Reitaisai, annual spring festival

April 21: Kiyoharai Purifying ceremony

April 22: Tojitsusai

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They went to above festivals, I'd bet.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

nigelboy Apr. 23, 2014 - 04:24AM JST Yep. Not a single complaint until the last 1985 visit by Nakasone. Please provide evidence of this China protest from April 21, 1979- April 22, 1985 encompassing 20 visits by Japanese PM's.

The sensitivity resembled that shown in 1982 when China denounced what it said were distortions in Japanese textbook accounts of Japan's wartime occupation of Manchuria. Nakasone apparently underestimated the depth of feeling in China when he visited Yasukuni.

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The sensitivity resembled that shown in 1982 when China denounced what it said were distortions in Japanese textbook accounts of Japan's wartime occupation of Manchuria. Nakasone apparently underestimated the depth of feeling in China when he visited Yasukuni.

That's not a complaint towards Yasukuni. You are merely making a poor assumption.

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@nigelboyAPR. 23, 2014 - 05:20AM JST The sensitivity resembled that shown in 1982 when China denounced what it said were distortions in Japanese textbook accounts of Japan's wartime occupation of Manchuria. Nakasone apparently underestimated the depth of feeling in China when he visited Yasukuni.

That's not a complaint towards Yasukuni. You are merely making a poor assumption.

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You should accept some people think Yasukuni is Japanese textbook, by now. :)

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nigelboy Apr. 23, 2014 - 05:20AM JST That's not a complaint towards Yasukuni. You are merely making a poor assumption.

In 1982, Deng Xiaoping made the remark to visiting NK leader Kim Il-sung: “Japan’s recent textbook revision and falsification of history have given us an opportunity to take another look at history and to educate the people. These events have educated not just the Chinese people but the Japanese people as well. I actually believe that this is a good thing.” In 1983, China started building a new memorial to the victims of the 1937 Nanjing Massacre on orders from Deng Xiaoping and the memorial hall was opened in August 15, 1985, the same day that Nakasone visited Yasukuni.

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Enough about the d@ng shrine already!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

In 1982, Deng Xiaoping made the remark to visiting NK leader Kim Il-sung: “Japan’s recent textbook revision and falsification of history have given us an opportunity to take another look at history and to educate the people. These events have educated not just the Chinese people but the Japanese people as well. I actually believe that this is a good thing.” In 1983, China started building a new memorial to the victims of the 1937 Nanjing Massacre on orders from Deng Xiaoping and the memorial hall was opened in August 15, 1985, the same day that Nakasone visited Yasukuni.

Wow. What a coincidence. August 15th. C'mon now, sfjp330.

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nigelboy Apr. 23, 2014 - 06:22AM JST Wow. What a coincidence. August 15th. C'mon now, sfjp330.

And your response is typical "that's not a complaint towards Yasukuni."

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Nearly 150 Japanese lawmakers paid homage at the Yasukuni war shrine on Tuesday

And as I expected, the comment section has exploded. Of course it did. Everyone just has to bash Japan on this, voicing their disgust and frothing at the mouth. If you don't have anything nice to say: shut up. It would be nice if people could do that, but then there wouldn't be anyone complaining. We have no right to dictate whether or not Japanese politicians visit Yasukuni. China doesn't either. It's the decision of the politicians. Let them make up their own mind.

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What's the protocol? When folks visit Yasukuni Shrine, do they have to enter their names and occupation in a visitor's log book of some kind? If the lawmakers visit as private citizens, do they have to enter their status as lawmakers? Otherwise, how do the media actually know when lawmakers visit the shrine? I wouldn't think the lawmakers would show up in a tour bus with banners announcing their arrival. Seems that all the media coverage does is provide ammo for China and South Korea to criticize Japan.

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Fox Cloud LeleanApr. 23, 2014 - 06:43AM JST We have no right to dictate whether or not Japanese politicians visit Yasukuni. China doesn't either. It's the decision of the politicians. Let them make up their own mind.

If that is the case, why don't we see German Chancellor and 150 German goverment representitives visiting Nazi Cemetary? They had similar results from the war, but why is there such a difference in behavior of German politicians compare to Japanese politicians?

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And your response is typical "that's not a complaint towards Yasukuni."

Because it's not. And can you dispense with your "Nazi Cemetary"? Yasukuni is not a Cemetary for one, and I already gave you the info where the ashes of the Class A are stored.

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This place will soon be the #1 tourist place in Japan.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Original name was tokyo ShoKon Sha, Meiji Emperor named. Shrine to invite souls, It is not war shrine and Nazi and Germany have nothing to do with Yasukuni.

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These politicians who insist that they are only paying tribute to those who died for their country when they visit Yasukuni are not telling the truth. If that’s all they wanted to do, they could walk five minutes down to Chidorigafuchi National Cemetery. Emperor Hirohito stopped visiting Yasukuni after 1978 because the shrine had been tainted by the presence of the Class A war criminals. His son, current Emperor Akihito, has maintained the imperial embargo on visits. Yasukuni is not about dignified homage, it is about scoring political points and drawing attention to revisionist history. The only thing that Japan’s modern reactionaries regret about the war is defeat, and they are still fighting an uphill battle against Japanese public opinion to justify wartime Japan’s “noble mission.” No amount of sanitizing will change that. The only way to end the controversy is to impose a moratorium on visits to Yasukuni by any serving Cabinet minister. If Abe is truly looking for a new beginning for Japan’s relations with its neighbors, that’s where he should start.

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Wow sfjp330. Straight from Jeff Kingston.

http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2013-08-12/abe-should-end-the-war-over-yasukuni-shrine

Chidorigafuji houses ashes of unidentified soldiers but I see nothing wrong with paying respects to the identified as well which the lawmakers do.

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If they are there as a private outing then why report it in the media. If they want to go, then go but don't make it into a political issue by reporting it to the world. I have been to Yasukuni shrine but I've never been in the news.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Don;t expect Abe start to ignnore Yasukuni. He is from Yamaguchi-ken.'

Do you people watch Anime? He is related to Kogoro Katusra (Takayoshi Kido) who was one of three who created Meiji Ishin. Ryomaden, Beside that, there are Japanese drams of Katsura. Drama is Gin Tama. Keep eyes on Samurai Anime and drama.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

"People that have been prosecuted as a leader the Pacific War general public, only 14 people are sleeping"

Excellent! and the muesum next to the priviate shrine is just there...for entertainment? Full of right wing propaganda and Japans justification for its actions in WW2? Then why dont heads of state from foriegn countries visit the shrine and pay their respects? I think you will find most will stay away from it. Its not even a state owned memorial. I think we all know the reasons for the visits. In order to stop all the uproar, the 14 criminals could easily be removed and placed in a shrine dedicated for them. Ive read all the convoluted reasons, like their souls have merged into one, etc. I guess there is a lesser shrine for the "others" who died at the hands of the Japanese on the grounds.

I agree, every country has its memorials, the US has the Iwo Jima memorial, the Hawaii Arizona memorial and many others, but they are owned/operated by the state.

Why doesnt a representative of the state (emperor) dedicate and erect memorials at sites of horror and disgust commited by IJA throughout Asia? economic packages, ODA, all good but nobody knows about it. Its sort of a shallow, please go away effort. A memorial, dedicated by the state is a permanent record of acknowlegement and accountablity. I think you will find this would resolve many of the issues you have today with Japan and its past. This of course will never happen, but if you look at other countries who have done so, you will find that it was the responsible thing to do.

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why don't we see German Chancellor and 150 German goverment representitives visiting Nazi Cemetary?

Probably because Germany has a very different belief system to Japan. Those in Germany who actually are religious follow Christianity mostly, so the Souls that they would pay respects to would, by the tenets of their faith, reside in Heaven. It's a little hard to visit Heaven while you're still alive. The Japanese believe that the Souls of their war dead are interred at Yasukuni; a shrine here on Earth where living mortals can enter and pay their respects.

Also, I'm not aware of there being any Nazi cemetaries. I wonder how many of those graves would be occupied by the genuine scum of mankind, and how many would be occupied by soldiers who only fought in the war from fear of the Nazi Socialist Party and the SS? Care to place an estimate?

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how do the media actually know when lawmakers visit the shrine?

They are waiting for any lawmaker to come all day every day during the Spring Festival.

Seems that all the media coverage does is provide ammo for China and South Korea to criticize Japan.

That's what Japanese media do.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Goosesteppin' to the shrine.

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Wikipedia and everybody say 14 Class A war criminal enshrined but it is not so. 13 were convicted. Not 14. Yoksuke Matsuoka died in Sugamo Prison with TB before trial. So, he was not convicted. He was frim Yamaguchiken, too. The prefecture has been getting Japanese top diplomats and politicians year after year since Hirobumi Ito. Recently, Kan from Ube City origin. And Abe now. Before them, Satoh, and Kishi. on and on of people from that prefecture.

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You think his sins just dies along with his death? Sorry, I am quite sad to tell you there is no such thing.

Which explains why he is included among the class A war criminals.

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But he was not convicted. He pushed Triad tie Pact, and so many things in Manchuria when he was executive, Sin or not, he was not convicted. He was not hung (kubitsuri). Just because others were hung does not change fact he was not hung. //don;t guess what I think, When he died of TB, I was reprimanded in my middle school because I said he was punished. Later,the person who went to see him in him death bed said he regretted that tripod tie pact, but I siad he was punished, So, don't decide what I think because you are not nearby me. Fact is fact. He died with TB is fact. You can;t change that to he was convicted and hung. You might like to change fact to lie but that is not my custom. If you want to keep fabricating, go ahead. But don;t force me to fabricate that he did not die with TB.

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I think the expression "done in ones capacity as a private citizen" is intellectually dishonest! Once you take an oath as a politician you represent the people, who elected you to represent their views and not your own, 24 hours a day, plain and simple! Only the Japanese people accept this ludicrous excuse from their elected leaders! Do you extend this excuse to others in Japanese society? How about other public figures, SMAP's Tsuyoshi Kusanagi for example, who was found wandering naked in a Tokyo park yelling incoherently and arrested! He was publicly and professionally shamed and punished. But was he on-the-job at the time, did he offend or harm anyone except his own self respect? The media and the public at large demanded his head and he was made to pay for his actions! Now before you some of you would like to point out that what he did was a "criminal act" let's remember that he was "off-duty" and any punishment given should have been handed him by the criminal justice system and not by a public lynch-mob. Why does the unbiased Japanese media have double standards regarding how they treat politicians and EVERYONE else. For those of you who defend these "private citizens" who hold public office explain why Kusanagi couldn't use the excuse he was acting in his private capacity and therefor rejects any punishment or condemnation from the public!

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Which country are you from, Mr. Perfect?

Being an elected representative is just a job like any other job. Once you clock off, the rest of your life, thoughts, beliefs are you own.

You have your private life and you have your time in your public office.

The two are entirely clear and separate.

In office one might have to carry out things entirely against one's own wishes or interest because they are the decision of the people. In private life, you are free to do as you please, within the law.

No, it is not "only the Japanese people" who accept it. Any mature, reasonable and intelligent person would.

Rather who on earth are the idiotic people who really believe someone is on duty 24/7?

Not even the fearful and fanatical North Koreans would believe that of their leader.

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This is a WAR SHRINE mind you not a shrine for peace or good fortune... Bunch of fascist Nationalists wasting tax payers money...

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Yasukuni is a private shrine. /No tax money is used by it. Private donations and sai-sens are not considered tax payers money..

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Well obviously these 146 politicians are anti-emperor since the Showa Emperor did not visit the shrine since 1978, nor has the present Emperor, and expressed his strong displeasure about the shines decision to include the Class A War Criminals. So isn't a visit to the shine by any "conservative" politician a blasphemy since they seem to believe in the old ways?

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It's also not a "shrine to war". It serves a spiritual service giving peace to the descendants who lost parents etc.

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It's also not a "shrine to war". It serves a spiritual service giving peace to the descendants who lost parents etc.

That's what they use to disguise the fact that it's a shrine to war.

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Just remove the war criminals name from the shrine. Even Emperor Hirohito is upset and choose to boycott the Yasukuni war shrine when the name of the Class A War Criminals being included in the shrine.

Emperor Hirohito expressed strong displeasure in 1988 over Yasukuni Shrine’s decision in the late 1970s to include Class-A war criminals on the list of people honored there, sources said Thursday, citing a memorandum by a former Imperial Household Agency official.

“That’s why I have not visited the shrine since,” the Emperor, known posthumously as Showa, told former Imperial Household Agency Grand Steward Tomohiko Tomita, according to a memorandum written by Tomita that was obtained by the Nihon Keizai Shimbun.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2006/07/21/national/hirohito-visits-to-yasukuni-stopped-over-war-criminals/#.U1hTnfmSwfA

Clearly,the tradition of honoring the dead have been politicalized in Yasukuni shrine.

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@ka-chan" You are right that people do not realize. When asked how you feel to succeed Emperor so young, Emperor Showa slipped to tell his true feelings that was prohibited but we read on B magazines. :I feel I have been on thin ice every day," These nationalists and military mongers used him as their puppet. The botanist who helped to edit his botanic study on Plant of Palace quoted in Bungei Shunju that Emperor had only plants and weed as friend. So these politicians were anti Emperor sistem like you analyzed. Probably Emperor hated War more than any Japanese and now these politicians are showing their true color. Your logic, I appraise.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Just remove the war criminals name from the shrine.

Apparently the shrine says that isn't possible; names can be removed from a list of course, but the spirits of the dead, once admitted, become one with the whole (they say). Demanding that they be removed once they're gone in is like asking for the removal of 14 drops of ink that have been swirled into a bucketful of water.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Just remove the war criminals name from the shrine. Even Emperor Hirohito is upset and choose to boycott the Yasukuni war shrine when the name of the Class A War Criminals being included in the shrine.

False. The Emperor stopped visiting in 1975 during which tine there was a debate among the public about "seperation of religion and state" and "private" and "public".

Furthermore, the Emperor wasn't questioning the enshrining the so-called "war criminals" itself for that was done in the 50's. He was questioning the decision of enshrining Cabinet members and diplomats who weren't on the battlefield which he felt was not the purpose of the establishment of Yasukuni. This issue, of course, is a totally different from what the Chinese/Koreans are complaining since their position is that ex post facto Class A "Crimes Against Peace" is the most severest of the charges when the reality is that no one was sentenced to death for being convicted of "Class A" charges alone.

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Apparently the shrine says that isn't possible; names can be removed from a list of course, but the spirits of the dead, once admitted, become one with the whole (they say). Demanding that they be removed once they're gone in is like asking for the removal of 14 drops of ink that have been swirled into a bucketful of water.

So you are telling me that even if family members ask to remove the name,they still won't allow? Family members got no say on it at all. That just bullshit.

Wikipedia say there's a senior LDP members who once proposed to remove the 14 Class A war criminals.

In June 2005, a senior LDP member proposed moving the 14 Class A war criminals to a separate site. Shinto priests refused this proposal, quoting Japan's freedom of religion laws under the Japanese Constitution.

Also in the same month, a group claiming to represent Taiwanese aborigines led by politician Kao Chin Su-mei attempted to visit Yasukuni Shrine with the sponsorship of the Japan Catholic Council for Justice and Peace. Their intention was to peacefully request the removal of their relatives from the shrine, and to pray for the return of their ancestors' souls. Request to perform religious rites within the Yasukuni property were refused and they were blocked from entering Yasukuni by Japanese protesters and police. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controversies_surrounding_Yasukuni_Shrine#Removal_of_the_names

@nigelboy Can you show me your source/citation?

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It's not a question of allow, it's spiritually impossible.

Cleo gave you a good answer.

Do you believe in the existence of the soul, Hansaram?

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Then why is there a LDP member who proposed to move the 14 Class A War Criminals to separate site. The shinto priest refuse not because it impossible but instead,they said it's freedom of religion laws.

So the wish of Taiwanese people,who want their relatives to be removed from Yasukuni shrine are also not allowed? Isn't that unfair?

In that case,just remove the name which is possible according to cleo. Not everyone is a Shinto. Some are Buddhists,Christian and so on and certainly,not all of them believe soul can not be removed.

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That just bullshit.

Couldn't agree more. It's religion - no logic/reality/common sense allowed. I'm sure most of it is made up as they go along.

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@nigelboy Can you show me your source/citation?

For what?

What amazes me is that why are you so bent out of shape on something you don't believe in? Your exerpt is a complete mystery in a sense that the list of names are not open to public to see. Therefore, in order to confirm that the deceased are on the list they had to request a formal application to Yasukuni.

So my question to these relatives is why would they go through with this tedious process to confirm the existence on something they don't believe in?

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

For what?

For your claim if you are telling the truth. My article there says Emperor Hirohito boycott the shrine because of Class A war criminal in it. The war criminal you talking about in 1950s is not the 14 war criminal class A but rather war criminal class B,C. It's the 14 Class A war criminal Hirohito having problem with.

What amazes me is that why are you so bent out of shape on something you don't believe in? Your exerpt is a complete mystery in a sense that the list of names are not open to public to see. Therefore, in order to confirm that the deceased are on the list they had to request a formal application to Yasukuni.

So my question to these relatives is why would they go through with this tedious process to confirm the existence on something they don't believe in?

So maybe they do indeed request formal application to Yasukuni. And because the relatives think it's an insult and shame that their relatives are being associated together with war criminals.

The Japanese treated aborigines as subhumans, the lawmaker said. “We were victims,” she pointed out, “how could we tolerate the victims being honored together with their persecutors?” http://www.chinapost.com.tw/taiwan/detail.asp?ID=63832&GRP=B http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controversies_surrounding_Yasukuni_Shrine#Removal_of_the_names

In fact,not just the Taiwanese,but Korean are no happy with it as well.

'It is glaring contradiction that those victims who were forcibly mobilized and then lost their lives are enshrined as spirits together with those perpetrators,'' said a lawyer representing the plaintiffs.

At a news conference, Lee Yong Chan, 66, whose father was drafted and then killed in action in China, said it is tantamount to violence and humiliation that his father is enshrined at Yasukuni.

''While I have never seen my father's face, I believe he does not wish to be enshrined there,'' said Lee, who now lives in the United States.

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Suit+filed+over+Korean+soldiers+enshrined+at+Yasukuni+Shrine.-a076443926

See,nigelboy. They don't want their family members name/soul to be associated with the perpetrators. Yasukuni shrine is a symbol of disgrace.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

For your claim if you are telling the truth. My article there says Emperor Hirohito boycott the shrine because of Class A war criminal in it. The war criminal you talking about in 1950s is not the 14 war criminal class A but rather war criminal class B,C. It's the 14 Class A war criminal Hirohito having problem with.

http://d.hatena.ne.jp/sppaiman/20060808/1155029777

Heated debate in the Diet Session in 1975 where the Socialist Party is denouncing the scheduled visit of the Emperor.

This is why the Emperor stopped going after

So maybe they do indeed request formal application to Yasukuni. And because the relatives think it's an insult and shame that their relatives are being associated together with war criminals.

They did, hence the discovery. Again, why are these relatives so bent up on the list that is private (in a sense that unless they requested the confirmation, nobody except Yasukuni would had knowledge) and for something they don't believe in?

See,nigelboy. They don't want their family members name/soul to be associated with the perpetrators. Yasukuni shrine is a symbol of disgrace.

So they are believers of Shinto?

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The 14 - and many of the 100s others - were no more "criminals" than Churchill for Dresden and certainly less than numerous high ranking CIA officers who regularly hand out "death lists" to right wing oppressive governments all around the world.

Many of them did great things for Japan before WWII, most of them were good family members. Their "crime" was just to be on the losing side. The Tribunal was widely criticised as nothing more than political theatre rooted in the continued history racism towards non-whites at the time.

To be honest, Hansaram, it does not feel like you are arguing from any moral point of view but just one of Race Hate fixated on poisoning sincere spiritual expression with false and hateful arguments.

In Buddhism, it is accepted that all individuals have some virtues. No individual is beyond redemption. Within Shintoism, the soul is purified and become pure and blameless again. Find peace in your own life and allow the families of these individuals to find peace in theirs.

Japan was forced into the WWII. Because of America's actions and refusals of peace offers, it could not avoid it.

If you are looking for something to blame, it was American imperial ambition within Pacific-Asia region.

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Heated debate in the Diet Session in 1975 where the Socialist Party is denouncing the scheduled visit of the Emperor. This is why the Emperor stopped going after

Not according to my source. My source from Japan Times also said Hirohito also feel displeasure towards the inclusion of the war criminals.

They did, hence the discovery. Again, why are these relatives so bent up on the list that is private (in a sense that unless they requested the confirmation, nobody except Yasukuni would had knowledge) and for something they don't believe in?

So they are believers of Shinto?

Doesn't matter. You just don't get it do you. The bottom line is they view Yasukuni shrine as a disgrace,centre of hatred and therefore,they don't want their relatives name to be there,that's all. It's a disgrace to their dead relatives for their name to be there.

To be honest, Hansaram, it does not feel like you are arguing from any moral point of view but just one of Race Hate fixated on poisoning sincere spiritual expression with false and hateful arguments.

Ahh..that's the excuse you always use when people around the world condemn Japanese right? People are bias and racist towards Japanese. Sorry,but that's not the case.

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No, the Yasukuni is not a place of hatred. It is a place of peace where soul and people go to find peace and spiritual . It is no different than any other national memorial such as, e.g. the Arlington National Cemetery, the USA's "most hallowed ground" which is, in fact full of the bones racists, murders and rapists who did little more than to serve American corporate and economic interests.

The problem is "they" think what they are told to think from one side and for reasons that have nothing to do with morality or goodness. Indeed, they have everything to do with Race Hate (or nationalism), internal political benefits and external economic benefits in the here and now.

Those sides are expressing and fomented Race Hate mainly as distraction from internal problems and internal corruptions in their own countries, and partly as economic warfare against today's innocent and blameless Japanese people ... which is why they should be ignored and heavily criticized.

Exploiting and inventing others' suffering for the sake of one's own political and economic advantages is immoral and disgusting.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Whether it is right or wrong, it is a matter for the Japanese people to deal with. I think non-Japanese people should not be involved. What happened 60 or 70 years ago is not acceptable and the Japanese people have already paid the ultimate price for what they did. Two atomic bombs devastated Japan and it took many years for the Japanese people to get back on their feet again. It is time to move on.

You don’t have to look hard to find that many Japanese people are still ashamed of what their government did, the proof is they still objected to the Japanese government to rebuilt or rearm themselves. The constitution was drafted after the war with the help of the American government and restricted the Japanese government’s re-arming and also prohibited the deployment of troops overseas. Until recently, they were only allowed to assist The United Nations in peace keeping, mainly involved in rebuilding infrastructure, no combat role.

It is also important to mention that Japan is one of the top five donors of foreign aid. In 2012 they donated over $10 billion and they are not even listed in the top ten richest countries based on their GDP per capita ( Luxemburg,Singapore,Norway,Brunei,Switzerland,San Marino, Canada, Australia)

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Not according to my source. My source from Japan Times also said Hirohito also feel displeasure towards the inclusion of the war criminals.

"Japan Times". Well that settles it, doesn'it it! (sarcasm)

The link I gave you are articles from 1975 where opposition parties were demanding that the Emperor cease the visit and as a result, the IHA and the Emperor obliged. The Emperor was uncomfortable with the subsequent enshrinement because he felt that members who did not die in the battlefield should not belong there. In either case, it's simply a domestic and internal matter which China has pledged not to interfere in the 1972 Communique.

Doesn't matter. You just don't get it do you. The bottom line is they view Yasukuni shrine as a disgrace,centre of hatred and therefore,they don't want their relatives name to be there,that's all. It's a disgrace to their dead relatives for their name to be there.

No. It certain does matter because those are the very same questions addressed in the courts when these 'relatives' filed them. Unless you can answer them in a rational manner, I can see why the case was dismissed and deemed 'frivolous".

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

@MyJT2014A

No, it's only a matter for those who carried whatever actions out. And they are dead now, so it's as dead and over as the Medieval Crusades.

For the most part, Japanese people have absolutely nothing to be ashamed about and should reject the various "guilt and shame by association" campaigns. And nor was the war particularly wrong in comparison to any other war. It was more valid than many.

What was the alternative? Americans carrying out a genocide, as per the Philippines (1900), Americans bombing women and children (Vietnam and Korea, 50s-60s), or America funding genocide and dictatorial rule as per, for example, Pol Pot, Indonesia and else where (60s- 80) ?

Their MO never changed over the entire 20th Century. Japan would have just been another victim.

It was bad enough having the Americans destroy the Japanese traditional landowners and aristocracy, the CIA building up the LDP power base, and engaging criminal gangs to do so. You can even thank they for idiocy of putting nuclear power stations on tectonic fault lines.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Japanese leaders need to figure out that savagery is not something to be proud of. High officials showing respect to war criminals can happen only in Japan.

Japanese leaders seriously need proper education.

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They are not war criminal any more. Try and understand. You need to educate yourself about Shinto beliefs.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

nigelboy APR. 23, 2014 - 07:53AM JST Chidorigafuji houses ashes of unidentified soldiers but I see nothing wrong with paying respects to the identified as well which the lawmakers do.

It'd be rather a very noble act to recognise the unknown soldiers fallen in the battlefield than the majors and captains who were mostly sitting behind the scene during the wars, a lot of them actually survived after the war and lived a few more years. Technically, they didn't die IN THE WAR. I find it very pathetic that the lawmakers can't/never even visit the other memorial that is very close to Yasukuni Shrine. I think that's why I find the visit dishonest especially when they bring up peace BS.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Let japanese be japanese. Lost souls need a place to return.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

China can complain only after they withdraw, apology and compensate from tibet, uygur and step back from taiwan.

Korea played victim but more than 800,000 korean applyed for japanese military voluntarily and many of them who passed the screening fought with japanese

What a hypocrites

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"Japan Times". Well that settles it, doesn'it it! (sarcasm)

The link I gave you are articles from 1975 where opposition parties were demanding that the Emperor cease the visit and as a result, the IHA and the Emperor obliged. The Emperor was uncomfortable with the subsequent enshrinement because he felt that members who did not die in the battlefield should not belong there. In either case, it's simply a domestic and internal matter which China has pledged not to interfere in the 1972 Communique.

Sorry,too bad I can't read Japanese.

No. It certain does matter because those are the very same questions addressed in the courts when these 'relatives' filed them. Unless you can answer them in a rational manner, I can see why the case was dismissed and deemed 'frivolous

Th rational manner is that they don't want their dead family to be associated with the centre of evil,which is Yasukuni shrine. It as simple as that.

No, the Yasukuni is not a place of hatred. It is a place of peace where soul and people go to find peace and spiritual Not according to Asian who suffer at the hand of Japanese. Yes,this including non Chinese and non Korean such as myself.

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