Smoke billows from an oil refinery in Kawasaki, southwest of Tokyo, in this 2013 file photo. Japan has adopted a new energy policy that pushes for nuclear and renewables as sources of clean energy to achieve the country’s pledge of reaching carbon neutrality in 2050. Photo: AP file
politics

Japan looks to renewables; role of nuclear power elusive

8 Comments
By Takaki Tominaga

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Small modular reactors (SMRs) are nuclear fission reactors that are a fraction of the size of conventional reactors. They are designed to be manufactured at a plant and transported to a site to be installed. Modular reactors will reduce on-site construction, increase containment efficiency, and enhance safety. The greater safety will come via the use of passive safety features that operate without human intervention. SMRs also reduce staffing versus conventional nuclear reactors.[1][2] SMRs are claimed to cross financial and safety barriers that inhibit the construction of conventional reactors. USA loves this idea and they are working on SMRs.

2.A molten salt reactor (MSR) is a class of nuclear fission reactor in which the primary nuclear reactor coolant and/or the fuel is a molten salt mixture. key characteristic of MSRs is their operation at or close to atmospheric pressure, rather than the 75-150 times atmospheric pressure of a typical light-water reactor (LWR), hence reducing the large, expensive containment structures used for LWRs and eliminating hydrogen as a source of explosion risk. Another important benefit of MSRs is that they do not produce dangerous and radioactive fission gases that are under pressure, as they are naturally absorbed into the molten salt.

Technology when it comes to Nuclear is advancing fast. France is getting 70% of its energy from Nuclear Power. If you don't have energy security the entire country can be in trouble including the economy and people's way of life.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

@reasonandwisdomnippon

It's pointless. Nuclear power is political dynamite in this country. Even if SMR's are viable, they will never be implemented. The restarted reactors will continue operation for the next 20 years and then be decomissioned completely. After that, Japan's energy mix will be 15% wind and solar, 10% hydro and 75% natural gas (combined cycle) power.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Just take all the human waste and plastic and metals and food waste and junk and use microbes and bacteria to turn it into energy.

Don't say it's not possible.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Just take all the human waste and plastic and metals and food waste and junk and use microbes and bacteria to turn it into energy.

Very inefficient and and low capacity power.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It's good to see the resent spate of climate related stories here on JT.

However, the stories often reflect the fact that STILL, so little regard is given to the enormous changes in our lifestyles that are needed if we are to match the seriousness consequences the climate crisis promises us.

I'd like to point out one small relevant example - Japan Today, like many other (not all) media outlets, doesn't have a Climate section - yet has sections for sport, business, and entertainment.

Really? Are these still deemed more important than the Climate Crisis?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We do. It's called Environment and you'll find it in the Features section under Lifestyle.

Really? Are these still deemed more important than the Climate Crisis?

Because pandering to a religious cult is not a good business model?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

We do. It's called Environment and you'll find it in the Features section under Lifestyle.

Thank you Moderator for pointing that out. But I think you have to admit - it's well hidden and certainly not as prominent as the reality of the issues would logically dictate.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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