politics

Kono says Japan will accept more foreign workers

71 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

©2018 GPlusMedia Inc.


71 Comments
Login to comment

I'm not against immigration. But is anyone in government trying to find out why so many of us are not getting married and having children?

30 ( +33 / -3 )

I think everyone shall be welcome in Japan if they are willing to assimilate into Japanese society."

assimilate? Resistance is futile

The level of assimilation required is off the chart and still not enough.

Kono cited sports stars including tennis sensation Naomi Osaka, the daughter of a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, as an example of the benefits of welcoming outsiders. Osaka, who was born in Japan but raised in the United States, is being lauded by Japanese.

Now that's not fair, and I have nothing but admiration for her, but to use her as an example of tolerance is a huge reach. She didn't grow up in Japan, doesn't really speek Japanese and has never had to apply for a work visa.

Still, there are millions of foreigners living in Japan, including those who work in technical training-related programs or labor-short industries such as restaurants, construction and elder care.

Yes there are a plethora of low skilled jobs available if they have passed the Japanese test, willing to forgo family and will leave after 5 years...assimilation?

Bizzare logic

27 ( +32 / -5 )

I wonder what kind of strings will be attached to this new visa.

You can bet they'll have something in there that makes sure people have to leave after a few years - ''help us look after our old people, as long as we don't have to look after u''

11 ( +17 / -6 )

Change has to come from within.

Foreigners here still have a hard time with basic things like getting a credit card, renting an apartment, etc.

But the policies and official rhetoric are slow changing. And if something is only needed because of population crashes, or halfs are recognised when they become champs but people are shocked when they are citizens in general...

You get what you give in life sometimes.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

I'm not against immigration. But is anyone in government trying to find out why so many of us are not getting married and having children?

Peak population. All species decline at this point, due to disease, lack of resources, crowding, probably a few more the human species can add to that list. Populations simply cannot grow indefinitely.

Accepting migrants workers is OK if they are encourage to assimilate. But that means giving them equal opportunities and treating them with equality - something Japan still struggles with. Otherwise, we will end up with a marginalized sector of society that will turn to crime and violence. Japan will hav to accept that a Philippino can come here as a laborer and end up as a company president, or a politician even. Can they do that?

11 ( +14 / -3 )

“Kono cited sports stars including tennis sensation Naomi Osaka, the daughter of a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, as an example of the benefits of welcoming outsiders.”

He’s kidding, right? Her and her family LEFT Japan very early on for the US, where she became successful. The US was the “welcoming” one, Japan presumably the “unwelcoming” one.

“I think everyone shall be welcome in Japan if they are willing to assimilate into Japanese society."

I wish Western officials would say that. "Integration" policies, especially in Europe, have proven unsuccessful and unpopular.

9 ( +15 / -6 )

Oh, I'll just sheepishly admit it: I clicked because of the woman seated on the far right.

(Begs forgiveness)

15 ( +19 / -4 )

Cricky

Brilliant post!

powderb

Oh, I'll just sheepishly admit it: I clicked because of the woman seated on the far right.

You and me both. She is a classic beauty!

2 ( +8 / -6 )

"It's good to have diversity. It's good to have an open policy," Kono said.

About the only good thing he said.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

+2 on the lady on the right. Elegant and classy.

Kono is correct. But he'll have to become PM before anyone will listen and take his advice.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Where countries in the West speak of integration, Japan speaks of assimilation. An aggressive form of cultural propaganda, but it works. More countries in the West should follow Japan's example.

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

Brilliant point.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

+2 on the lady on the right. Elegant and classy.

That may be true but I'd need more than a photo before reaching that conclusion; Singaporean ladies can be a, let's say, a challenge. Listen to the lady on the left, she really is elegant and classy.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Fair point Harry.

"It's good to have diversity. It's good to have an open policy," Kono said.

I can just picture Abe' and Aso' faces when Kono said this.

"He'll be counting papaer clips when he gets back!"

6 ( +6 / -0 )

"It's good to have diversity. It's good to have an open policy," Kono said.

Now to convince about 120 million people, that have been systematically taught otherwise, of that.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

maybeperhapsyes

+2 on the lady on the right. Elegant and classy.

Kono is correct. But he'll have to become PM before anyone will listen and take his advice.

Do you seriously believe Kono strongly believes in what he is saying and if he was PM he

would try to practise it, It just nothing but lip service to the international media.

Abe talked about women's empowerment and we all know the results, nada.

There is so much mistrust of foreigners by the Japanese to the extend that foreigners will never be

able to integrate. The J media over the years has preached to the Japanese how they are different

and special and don't believe a non Japanese even if your Japanese is impeccable can be like them.

labor-short industries such as restaurants, construction and elder care.

The above industries are not facing any labor shortage. they are just not paying well that is

why they are having problems securing workers.

There are thousands of over fifties who are willing to work but cannot find decent jobs

and are treated like disposable paper despite having experience just because companies prefer

the young that they can train and have total control over.

14 ( +14 / -0 )

Cricky & Jefflee are right on.

Naomi's parents made the decision to leave Japan precisely because of intolerance shown esp by his in-laws.

As Haitian & Japanese citizens they slotted into US society and the country gave them (the whole family) the chance to pursue their dreams. I doubt if the same opportunities would have been afforded them here, but we will never know.

Now Naomi is a wonderful ambassador for Japan (how lucky the country is), but it has zilch to do with any great welcoming, assimilation, acceptance program over the past decades.

But on a positive note it does show that a shift in social attitudes towards foreigners is increasing and understanding is far more common than only a dozen years ago. A more open, warm,thoughtful  immigration policy can only further develop this cultural shift.

However,  I still have a few reservations, eg. when I see the sumo wrestler Kisenosato lauded to the hilt, based primarily on the widely promoted premise that he is a "born in Japan" yokozuna. Other wrestlers of differing nationalities and even those naturalized taking on Japanese nationality, are certainly on a lower rung.

But the ball is rolling.

14 ( +15 / -1 )

If I had only known decades ago that being a good tennis player would have led to a golden life in Japan.....

11 ( +11 / -0 )

I think everyone shall be welcome in Japan if they are willing to assimilate into Japanese society

And it should also go both ways. If the attitude of Japanese people towards foreigners stays the same, I doubt change will happen. I consider myself a good citizen, paying my taxes and fees (even NHK fee), following all rules, learning and practising Japanese everyday and will take my N1 exam this year. But after living here for several years, I don't know, I just feel that something is missing. Is it because whenever I go to a restaurant with my East Asian looking friend who barely speak any Japanese, the waiter seems to talk only to him, even though I speak fluent Japanese? (I'm a brown skinned Southeast Asian) Or is it because I was refused by many apartment landlords only because I'm a foreigner? Or is it because it seems so hard to make friends with Japanese people?

Don't get me wrong, I love Japan, it's culture, food, safety environment, but I'm thinking twice whether I should continue to live long term here. And I'm saying this as a well-paid skilled engineer; I wonder what it is like for many blue-collar foreign workers struggling to live here because of the low pay and their basic Japanese proficiency. Japan is a great country, but unless things change, it's gonna be hard for future foreigners who will come here and it's just not sustainable.

18 ( +18 / -0 )

Although I understand the misgivings of some of the commentary above, this is the right time for this. The anti foreigner sentiment in Japan is but a small cross section of society, although a rather loud and obnoxious one! It doesn’t represent the mainstream at all.

Kono is right also for those that come to try and assimilate as best they can. Also think this guy seems a cut above. Work hard, learn the language , understand the culture and be patient. It takes a bit of time , but the locals will warm to you and open right up if you do it well, the right ones will anyway. Just keep an eye on some of the more unscrupulous business practices and it’ll be a win win. This is the prudent move for Japans demographic woes. Mindful immigration!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@drlucifer

Do you seriously believe Kono strongly believes in what he is saying and if he was PM he

would try to practise it, It just nothing but lip service to the international media.

I do. Have actually spoken to him years back when he visited a shrine where I live.

He has a sound understanding of international diplomacy which no other in his party is even close to understanding.

We all know his upbringing and background. He'll make a better PM than we have had in a few decades.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Hes just blowing hot air.

And if he isn't, then you need to make things easier for foreigners.

I've been living in Japan for ten years, worked at the most respected university in the country and now work at a Japanese company but the bank I have been using from the beginning has rejected my credit card application multiple times.

Its absurd. But I guess it is good to not be living in debt.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

@vistula

Don't get me wrong, I love Japan, it's culture, food, safety environment, but I'm thinking twice whether I should continue to live long term here. And I'm saying this as a well-paid skilled engineer; I wonder what it is like for many blue-collar foreign workers struggling to live here because of the low pay and their basic Japanese proficiency. Japan is a great country, but unless things change, it's gonna be hard for future foreigners who will come here and it's just not sustainable.

Welcome to the thoughts those have after putting in some serious years here. Good luck on the N1 too! Thats great!

8 ( +8 / -0 )

JeffLee:

He’s kidding, right? Her and her family LEFT Japan very early on for the US, where she became successful. The US was the “welcoming” one, Japan presumably the “unwelcoming” one.

And Osaka's maternal grandfather didn't want anything to do with her mother once it was known her mother was dating a black guy. And suddenly, when Osaka won the US Open, he was on TV saying how happy and proud he was.

This sums up the general attitude in Japanese society. We don't like you, but if you're famous, wealthy and adored by the rest of the world - give us a big hug - you're one of us.

15 ( +17 / -2 )

@lesenfant:

Good luck on the N1 too! Thats great!

Thanks! Even though I had some complaints living here, I still love Japanese language.

but the bank I have been using from the beginning has rejected my credit card application multiple times.

Have you tried Rakuten Card? My fellow gaijin friend all got accepted with a reasonable credit limit. Probably because Rakuten is one of a few Japanese companies that is gaijin friendly; even they use English as the main working language!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"It's good to have diversity. It's good to have an open policy," Kono said.

Unfortunately, the Japanese understanding of the word 'diversity' is quite different to the dictionary definition. Diversity in populations means diversity in cultures, not just in faces and skin color. "outsiders who might not speak their language or conform to expectations for how to behave." This statement totally contradicts the meaning of diversity.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I wish Western officials would say that. "Integration" policies, especially in Europe, have proven unsuccessful and unpopular.

In my experience, many Japanese people see Europe as an example of what not to do.

Unfortunate for Europe, but an instructive example to others.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I don't think I've ever heard an LDP minister sound so pragmatic!

vistula - Nice post. Japanese people also find it difficult to make friends with Japanese people, so don't worry too much about it!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

What a load of crap.

Rather than address the dysfunctional conditions that put Japan into a demographic death spiral to begin with, he says that Japan Inc. will simply import more fodder to down under what will be even worse conditions.

The LDP's well publicized plan (by April next year) is to bring unskilled immigrant labor into Japan to fill low paying kkk jobs (kitenai, kikken, kitsui) that Japanese don't want to be stuck with ... but unlike most Japanese ... with no real labor unions, no upward path to long-term visas, and no right to bring their spouse — a dead-end job with no family support? I'd say that is a recipe for disaster ... little more than legalized human trafficking.

Wasn't it just last month that 4 unnamed firms were found guilty of forcing foreign trainees to work at Fukushima to help clean up that radioactive mess? Hmm ... but not guilty enough to name and shame those firms. So when a slave revolts, we know who will be named and given an excuse why.

It certainly won't be the likes of Naomi Osaka. Cute girl, and kudos to her ... but she is in no way correlated with his (cough-cough) 'analysis' of the situation.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Lynn Kuok looks skeptical.  Singapore has a goof record of using selective immigration to boost its economy and import skills needed to build up selected industries.  not sure it is that easy in a country the size of Japan, but surely worth a try.

Not that it is made easy for foreigners coming here for the first time.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

In my experience, many Japanese people see Europe as an example of what not to do.

I can't comment on Europe, but my four months living in Vancouver, Canada this summer showed me a place where diversity is thriving.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

@Steve Martin, spot on. More time is spent trying to put icing on a cake than actually fixing the cake. There is a saying for this no matter how much bread you use its still a **** sandwich

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Both the women look like the business.... where as Kono-san looks like something out of a comedy show..... oh, wait....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

sigh...............where to begin. So many things mentioned in the article that deserve an "oh really?!?"

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I am convinced Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono would fly to the opening of an envelope given half the chance.

He's travelled more globally than the International Space Station. All at the tax payers expense.

This is an area where savings can be made.....

Video conference is smarter

3 ( +5 / -2 )

I think we have to laud the positive attitude of the government.

Yes, Japan is clueless about how to respectfully integrate (not assimilate) foreigners.

Yes, the comparison with Naomi Osaka is completely absurd.

Yes, there are many skilled foreigners (including me) who have borne the brunt of irrational Japanese policies towards foreigner in an official sense, and intolerant behavior of the society in an unofficial sense.

Now, let's look at the positive side. Japan is a country known for its "isolation" since historical times. They have raised the bar high and have kept it high for a long time. We have to appreciate the dedication, hard-work and commitment of Japanese people to take their society to the levels they have achieved (positive and negative ways of course). And we foreigners have to help them with this initiative, because they are ACTUALLY clueless about this.

I think there has to be more of a constructive dialogue (not mud-slinging) between Japanese people and groups that will lobby on behalf of Foreigners. It is a fun fact that one of such groups I googled last year had NO foreigner on their advisory board. High time things start rolling and Gaijin proactively work with Nihonjin to make Japan a better place.

I will still like to say the glass is half full.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

"Give me your tired, huddled masses, yearning to work free..."

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Japan is still sadly getting this horribly wrong, wish it were otherwise but the spiral downwards continues unabated!

The demographic problem has been in PLAIN sight for more than 30years now, Japan should have started making changes wrt foreigners in the early 90s, it may well already be too light to turn the population decline around so Japan would hover around 100million-ish………

Japan needs to seriously look at ways to have people STAY, offer tracks to change citizenship & MUST offer dual citizenship as well.

Have multilingual forms at govt/banks etc

All the while thinking of ways that make it easier for foreigners to adjust/integrate etc

But very little is really happening.

And spouting off about Osaka san, is just deplorable! She has done great because she LEFT Japan, now she is being lauded left right & centre…….great but please so far it has ZERO to do with Japan accept from her mother!!

Japan, please START getting things right, its not that difficult, time is a wasting, & Japan does NOT have time on its side!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

@itsonlyrocknroll

I am convinced Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono would fly to the opening of an envelope given half the chance.

He's travelled more globally than the International Space Station. All at the tax payers expense.

This is an area where savings can be made.....

Video conference is smarter

I respectfully disagree mate. It is the job of the foreign minister to go abroad and promote his country. That will no doubt mean staying in pricey hotels and going to expensive banquets. That's how all business is conducted. He's doing it right whereas his predecessors have been doing it wrong. Japan needs to get out there and meet the world. The world won't come to them.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

You and me both. She is a classic beauty!

pretty and smart makes her more attractive in my book

https://lynnkuok.com/

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Assimilate?

Japanese government should understand that we're not living in a Star Trek universe and they are not the Borg.

You can't expect a Mexican become a Russian or a Madagascar person acting like a Finnish.

The proper word should be integration,you cannot force people with different cultural background like you but you can accept diversity allowing these people to integrate pacifically and with a mutual respect from both sides,the foreigners that live in the host country and the local that live with them.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

@browny1 You wrote Naomi Osaka left Japan because of intolerance of her in-laws. Do you have a source on that? I don't doubt it, but I'd like to see that firsthand.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

useless bafflegab when you have to leave after a 5 year limit is not assimilation. Also as noted before Japan is last place in Asia for foreign workers. They can say whatever they want it doesn't mean anything. Osaka is by all accounts grew up in Florida so would be American with Japanese heritage and not any cogent example of immigration or assimilation. Kono doesn't know of an example

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Renowned Japanese economist Takaaki Mitsuhashi should knock some sense into this foreign minister Kono.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

To some extent the number of immigrants to Japan posting on here shows that it is not impossible to make a life here.  I don't believe we were who Kono means (my guess Filipino nurses and cleaners, konbini cashiers and other Asian factory workers etc)  but goes to show it can be done.  Not always easy, but still doable.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If I'm losing my time checking this column, wow, Lynn Kuok is really cute and beautiful at the picture above!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Kono son of politician, has inherited his place.

Lynn Kuok, daughter of billionnaire Malaysian Tycoon, has inherited her father's fame (and surely contacts). Not done anything special outside having nice communication channels. What does she know about strategy ?

It is still cool to see beauties ;) but I did not click for that first place !

Koreans usually earn hard their position. Did not check her background.

Foreign are foreign and need to learn through efforts patience to get possibility to be recognized as Japanese.

Patience means decadeS, not just 10 years. Time is not fluctuating same as for other countries (a colleague of mine standing 1 desk away from mine, and working once every week together, said 18 months after I started working that she did not know me enough to reply to a question such as "are you married"...)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

WTFJapan, jess, she's very intelligent, bright, educated and talented, and she's pretty.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

All readers back on topic please. Ms Kuok's looks are not relevant to the discussion.

While technically Japanese by birth, Osaka moved to Florida when she was 3, and grew up American and would have grown up like a 2nd generation kid. It's her family that assimilated to the USA, not her to Japan. It's commented that her Japanese skills are weak but I say the other way, that for her environment, learning what she has isn't bad and fairly typical of 2nd gen or later kids with few speaking opportunities beyond the home. It's normal. I'm sure she'll improve.  

This is another case of Japan holding on to any tenuous connection like when Kazuo Ishiguro won a Nobel prize for literature. His family moved to UK when he was 5 and thus grew up British.

They have nothing to do with Japanese immigration or assimilation since they didn't grow up there. More like world citizens who have a tie to Japan through family and stay connected with it but not exclusively

This speaks to a wider human experience beyond nationality that I find Japanese have a difficult time to consider. But once nationality is broken down separately into heritage and country then it's easy. For them both to be successful in American and UK, their heritage would have been interesting for a minute but overall not that important.  We don't live our parent's lives, we live our own.

So congrats to her, and her accomplishments.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Well, I have lived in Japan nearly 20 years and always made good money and been treated well. Yeah, a few apartments may have denied me for being foreign, but that didn't happen after I got married. Certainly we are lucky in that Japanese food is darn good! Notwithstanding the headline Japan is undergoing stealth immigration in large numbers. Just look around anywhere in Tokyo and it is in plain sight.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

I wonder if the decline in babies being born has anything to do with harassing and firing women from the workplace for becoming pregnant, and at the same time complain about the state of Japan? hmmm

What a hard nut to crack. I'm sure no other country in the world has a solution to this.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

"It's good to have diversity. It's good to have an open policy," Kono said.

It certainly is. I wish more people in charge would come out and say it. Is it that hard to state the obvious?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

So basically, older Japanese workers who are struggling after 22 years of economic decline will be sacked and fake visa foriegn young workers will take their jobs and send all their money back to their countries, contributing nothing to japans economy.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

is anyone in government trying to find out why so many of us are not getting married and having children?

Demographics is a big ship to turn around. A lot of the population isn't able to produce children (due to age). The cohort that can produce children is shrinking in proportion.

To turn this dynamic around would take a long time, even if a way to incentivize more children making is possible.

Massive financial benefits for young couples having kids early, and some kind of employment schemes to ensure parents are able to easily rejoin the workforce could help - but it would be a multi-decade effort.

And cutting money from the Japanese budget to make fiscal room for the first part would be politically unpopular with some vested interest group, while the second part has massive cultural barriers to overcome.

So get used to a steady decline in the population! (Maybe these foreign workers will produce some more tax revenues, but those in power will choose to spend it on short-term boondoggles instead)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I knew it. Lots of tough talk but no teeth. No realism. Japan’s changing. Can’t turn back. Take a good look at Japan now. It’s going the way of the dinosaurs or dodo bird.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Hi maybeperhapsyes, There has to be a clear fiscal policy to provide clarity on how to balance the general account budget for government ministries requests 2019, reaching a record ¥102.8 trillion.

In order to maintain, may I suggest, restore any semblance of fiscal or monetary discipline, every ministry will have to significantly tighten there belts.

No ifs, no buts, by 2039, and that is assuming revenue taxes on income, corporate profits, social security contributions, goods and services etc etc remains consistent , and the economy is devoid of economic shocks, Japan government debt interest repayment will exceed tax income. Thats game over.

I agree, and forgive my sarcasm. I am obviously not suggesting that Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono swims and thumbs a lift, however Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono might have to curtail or at least review his travel expenses.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"It's good to have diversity. It's good to have an open policy," Kono said.

A foreign minister uttering this statement would have been absolutely unthinkable to even imagine just 5 years ago, let alone 10 or more years ago.

What we are witnessing happening in Japan is a very good example of how change happens in a society. It almost always happens as a result of external forces pushing internal changes. I cannot think of an exception to this rule. Japan today is where England was about 10 to 15 years ago. In 10 to 15 years from now, Tokyo will become very multicultural place, just like London.

Remember, change is never accepted, let alone welcomed anywhere in the world. It is always opposed, resisted, and eventually accepted.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Lets be honest I am struggling with kanji N4, after god knows how many years, if foreigners are going to assimilate, I hope they can make a better job than I have.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It's good news, but be careful that you don't allow mass hordes of people to immigrate to Japan, people who have no desire to adopt to Japan's culture or language. Make sure these are quality immigrants who can contribute to society, learn from the mistakes many other industrialized nations have done for the sake of political correctness.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

A large number of foreigners coming here will be met with discrimination and racism.

The Japanese have little idea of how a Vietnamese really feels the need to go home for Tet (and will) or that the family unit in the Philippines and Thailand is as important as the company is to a Japanese.

No laws protecting foreigners as a group are on the books.

Are the Japanese going to build ghettoes? I am sure that it has been mulled already

I see many problems ahead....

5 ( +5 / -0 )

A large number of foreigners coming here will be met with discrimination and racism.

The Japanese have little idea of how a Vietnamese really feels the need to go home for Tet (and will) or that the family unit in the Philippines and Thailand is as important as the company is to a Japanese.

It is not the responsibility of any corporation, no matter what country, to accommodate every little cultural whims and desires of multiple racial/ethnic groups. If one needs to go back to the home country or have religious requirements, then find a job and schedule that accommodates this. A job is a privilege, not a right.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

will take their jobs and send all their money back to their countries, contributing nothing to japans economy.

the J gov will still get company and salary taxes and Japan will keep it manufacturing, aged care, farming etc. dont let in foreign workers then J companies will have no choice but to move those jobs to other countries then the J gov gets no income from taxes

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I am struggling with kanji N4, after god knows how many years, if foreigners are going to assimilate, I hope they can make a better job than I have. I know very little Kanji , basic J lanuage ability only assimilate just as much as I need to be, yet it hasn't stopped me running my own business and earning considerably more than your average J salaryman.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@oldman_13

We already know that Japanese companies do not allow their staff much leeway when it comes to personal freedoms.

Annual leave prohibited,unpaid overtime and intrusive company practices ie no tattoos or limits on personal relationships etc are all facets of the corporate culture here.

Do you really think that their foreign staff will put up with the same exploitative mindset?

No, they will just leave.....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think understanding the Japans cultural forms of communication can sometimes be traumatic within family life.

I can speak the language reasonable well. Being able to integrate and participate in local community activities is essential.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Well, you just contradicted yourself kurisupisu.

You yourself now claim that Japanese companies supposedly don't treat their own Japanese citizens decently, with exaggerated claims of intrusive company policies and all sorts of limits on personal freedoms. How then, is it 'racism,' if foreigners are treated the exact same way?

Your claim of 'racism' would only have merit if foreigners were treated differently.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I would like to know what Kono's position was when the idea was proposed by the DPJ (if I am not mistaken)

of allowing foreigners with permanent residence allowed to vote and his party the LDP was vehemently against.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What we are witnessing happening in Japan is a very good example of how change happens in a society. It almost always happens as a result of external forces pushing internal changes. I cannot think of an exception to this rule. Japan today is where England was about 10 to 15 years ago. In 10 to 15 years from now, Tokyo will become very multicultural place, just like London.

I'm not sure if this is supposed to be satire or not. If London is supposed to be something for Tokyo to aspire to, then god help Japan.

Remember, change is never accepted, let alone welcomed anywhere in the world. It is always opposed, resisted, and eventually accepted.

In other words: democracy is a farce.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The government accepting is fine. But then it is the government making plans for the future of Japan.

The key is the Japanese industries and companies willing, able and capable of accepting and appropriately and meaningfully employing them. There are corporate cultures as well as local customs and traditions as well as prejudices and superstitions that must be properly and meaningfully addressed and coordinated.

That means it takes time to not only educate, reorient, adjust, train and prepare for such influx of foreign workers by not only corporations but also the population individually and as a group.

While the Japanese people I have observed are very accommodating to visitors and are attracted to foreign fashions and trends, things are different at the workplace, where their own work performance and jobs are at stake.

Then there is a problem with employing ousted and retired Japanese population that are still capable of working and want to work but not given the opportunity to do so.

Government cannot just declare and intent and simply initiate action without the entire population being prepared and willing.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

First of all train your own people on how to behave with Foreigners.

They are working in Japan to help you people, you useless oldies.

You are not great people anymore, Foreigner are not your slaves.

I have been working in Japan for last 12 years, seen so many assholes.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites