politics

U.S. takes aim at countries doing business with N Korea

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By Jennifer Peltz

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"What is definitely unacceptable to us is that on the one hand we work so hard to peacefully resolve this issue and on the other hand our interests are subject to sanctions and jeopardized," Geng said at a regular news briefing. "This is unfair."

And it's unfair that the NK regime keeps ignoring UN sanctions against it as well.

What is it going to take for China to finally put it's foot down?

1 ( +8 / -7 )

I'm guessing they won't be coming after the pachinko parlors.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

China makes more than just running shoes. A lot of the standard electrical components and basic machinery required for things like power plants and telecom networks are made in China.

If all imports from China halted the cascading effect on the US supply chain would be catastrophic. It would take 5 to 10 years for the US or anybody else to make up the slack.

We're talking a Mad Max scenario if all trade with China stops.

But of course, Pentagon strategists know this, hence all this talk is just posturing and hoopla.

4 ( +13 / -9 )

Burnongbush you are wrong. All cheap electric components are made in China, most companied can switch to domestic production in a short time. i can tell you because I work at an industrial level, all cheap electric devices are made in china.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

"What is definitely unacceptable to us is that on the one hand we work so hard to peacefully resolve this issue and on the other hand our interests are subject to sanctions and jeopardized,"

Exactly what has China done to resolve the issue peacefully, besides using its veto to stop any serious actions against the North in the last 15-20 years?

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Burning BushToday  07:26 am JST

China makes more than just running shoes. A lot of the standard electrical components and basic machinery required for things like power plants and telecom networks are made in China.

If all imports from China halted the cascading effect on the US supply chain would be catastrophic. It would take 5 to 10 years for the US or anybody else to make up the slack.

We're talking a Mad Max scenario if all trade with China stops.

Nonsense. China stopped exporting precious metals as a political act several years ago as they were the world's number one exporter. Quickly the world moved and established alternative sources. Southeast Asian nations and South American nations have been slowly chiseling away at China's export monopoly, fueled by the rising labor costs in China. The world does not "need" China, there are plenty of alternatives.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

China could change this all in 5 minutes, and keep trading if thats what they want.

All they have to do is say they will no longer observe the alliance and military pact they have with NK due to the hostile nature of their activities, if they do any more tests on the basis that it is putting Chinese Citizens at risk, they will not defend against preemptive strikes or come to their aid if any U.N sanctions are breached.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

China made North Korea possible. China owns North Korea's existence and could turn it off any time. China has used North Korea since its creation. Whatever happens to North Korea, it likely will not go well for China. But then, it shouldn't. Sic semper tyrannis.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Ahem. What we have here is a case of a floundering empire too drunk on it's hubris to realize the games already over. This is akin to punishing your employer for murking up your pay. Some entities are too big to meddle with now. There is no such thing as perpetual empires. The sooner us realizes this and adjusts,the better for east asia. Anything less than that,will lead to catastrophic results. Hang onto your hats folks!!

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

I'm guessing they won't be coming after the pachinko parlors.

Indeed, Japan has not frozen private cash remittances yet.

Doing so would probably cause a huge backlash from the Chongryun and the usual cries of racism bias etc...

9 ( +9 / -0 )

"What is definitely unacceptable to us is that on the one hand we work so hard to peacefully resolve this issue and on the other hand our interests are subject to sanctions and jeopardized," Geng said 

Work so hard!! LOL China supplies 90% of NKs energy needs. The situation has become far too serious for the world to continue to buy China's lip service. China needs to be forced to shut down NK's nuclear and ballistic missile program down. Or China's economy can go down the toilet. Which is more important to China?

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Two words: Communist China. 100% to blame for North Korea mess. No way should a communist country be part of the United Nations. Only countries where the people are free.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

 China needs to be forced to shut down NK's nuclear and ballistic missile program down

There's that word again. Force. A long history of unaccountable war crimes has given most individuals a very hubristic outlook on life.

These are the big dogs. Not some derelict entity waiting for the inevitable to happen. With the intertwined economies, any forceful action against the largest economy on the planet would be catastrophic to say the least.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Well, the US didn't take aim at Donald Rumsfeld when he planted the "nuclear seed" we are dealing with now!

U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld served on the board of a Swiss company that in 2000 sold light water nuclear reactors to the government of North Korea, which critics?including Pentagon hardliners?say could be used to produce nuclear weapons.

While China certainly could do more, it was the US who directly helped NK advancements in nuclear technology.

Plant the seed, to create a problem, get the desired reaction, then offer solutions that support hidden agendas.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

A lot of the standard electrical components and basic machinery required for things like power plants and telecom networks are made in China.

That's incorrect. There are companies in the US, Korea, Japan, and Europe that make the basic components of the electric power equipment. ABB, Hyosung, Mitsubishi, etc. I work in the field. We can keeps the lights on without the Chinese, thanks.

At the same time Japan does have to crack down on all remittances to NK from anybody. Deportation of the NK citizens might be discussed. It's not racism. There are plenty of SK folks in Japan.

we work so hard to peacefully resolve this issue and on the other hand our interests are subject to sanctions and jeopardized," Geng said at a regular news briefing. "This is unfair."

Whine on Mr. Geng. The Chinese haven't done diddly to constrain NK. In fact it seems that China might benefit from having their rabid dog causing problems. After all, if NK dropped a nuke on Tokyo or Guam would the world be able to hold China responsible?

While it's nice to see that the US is going to put more pressure on China maybe the next step is to discuss the idea that an attack originating from NK would be viewed as an attack from China. A modern twist on what JFK told the USSR about Cuba. Let's see what Mr. Geng has to whine about that.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

We can keeps the lights on without the Chinese, thanks.

Lol, good luck champ!!

While it's nice to see that the US is going to put more pressure on China maybe the next step is to discuss the idea that an attack originating from NK would be viewed as an attack from China

Lol, you're on a roll there. While you're at it let's call Santa and the Easter Bunny and ask their opinion on geopolitics. Wake up man!! Anything less than diplomatic discourse is fast track to Armageddon!!

1 ( +6 / -5 )

If the US could so easily do without imports from China than why haven't they already stopped? It would likely cost billions and would further destabilize the market for one.

For all those who are soling blaming China for not stopping NK, why do you have soo many Chinese made products in your homes? If the US really believes China is the only reason NK is able to function, then why don't they stop supporting Chinese imports?

That would be a real sanction and one that would likely lead to slowing NK's nuclear development.

As I already pointed out, it was Donald Rumsfeld who planted this "nuclear seed" and sold nuclear tech to NK back in 2000. All this posturing is just part of,

problem, reaction, solution, with a deep agenda.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

its all in the hands of USA. Start imposing tariffs to chinese products

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Stuart haywardToday  09:42 am JST

If the US could so easily do without imports from China than why haven't they already stopped? It would likely cost billions and would further destabilize the market for one.

For all those who are soling blaming China for not stopping NK, why do you have soo many Chinese made products in your homes? If the US really believes China is the only reason NK is able to function, then why don't they stop supporting Chinese imports?

China has played Americans for fools since the Clinton era. They lied to us about a "Peaceful Rise" for decades. China's true intentions towards the US are now very clear.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

At the same time Japan does have to crack down on all remittances to NK from anybody. Deportation of the NK citizens might be discussed. It's not racism. There are plenty of SK folks in Japan.

Yes there are immigrants from SK. However, the "Zainchi" came to Japan when there was no North or South Korea. Just the annexed Chosun which was technically part of Japan.

Many repatriated during the 50's, but most stayed and enjoy benefits such as exemption from taxes, alternative aliases, and elegibilty for welfare.

To separate the Pro-Kim from the majority who just want to make a living would be difficult at best, and would most definitely be met with fierce opposition, calls of racism, "Nazi-Abe," and whatnot.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

China, what a joke. This is their part of the world and yet it allows, some might even say actively encourages, a backward & dysfunctional country like N. Korea to develop, create and possess nuclear weapons. So, should the U.S. be worried? Hell, yeah! And everybody else should be too. I don't care for Trump, but China looks like it's playing both sides of the same gameboard for quite a while now.

"Chaos is a ladder."

HBO's Game of Thrones
-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Sanctions have never worked.

Never.

Never in the history of sanctions.

They only lead to misery and/or war.

For the leader of a country, acquiescing to sanctions by the US will lead to their death, the destruction of their country and the killing of hundreds of thousands of people at the hands of the US. Look at Iraq and Lybia.

Damned if you do and damned if you don't.

Where is this great negotiator, the smarter than everyone art of the deal maker?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Ossan - you means rare earths, not precious metals.

Mystifies me why 1. this has suddenly escalated into this crisis - NK have been doing this stuff for years.  2.  Why only now there is talk of comprehensive sanctions  3.  Why China seems to prefer chance of nuclear (or at least very bad conventional) war over regime change in NK - all this talk of 22 m NK "refugees" running to China seems unlikely.  4.  Why the US and SK think it is ok to make all these military "gestures" right on China's doorstep - imagine if Russia or China or indeed anyone did the same in (say) the Caribbean or even L:atin America.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Kaerimashita.

1, because of the escalation of tests.

2, because China and Russia don't want war on their doorstep and see its heading that way.

3, China doesn't want US troops on its boarder and are willing to risk it.

4..The difference is that that SK or US (lets not get into the middle east...) or Japan aren't supporting, and more of less the sole support to a hermit human rights violating dictatorship that is developing weapons with open, direct and specific threats against other countries in the region. If they were then perhaps China or Russia would do similar things.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

KaerimashitaToday  11:24 am JST

Ossan - you means rare earths, not precious metals.

Yes you're right I meant rare earth metals, not precious metals.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Not only China, but Russia employs cheaper North Korean indentured laborers (like those working on the FIFA World Cup stadium at St. Petersburg) instead of hiring local Russians and still encourages tourism to North Korea - all those money helping prop up the Kim regime

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This policy is a failure. I think we need to get used to living with a nuclear North Korea and increase trade with them.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Like to see USA bully Russia or china. Bullies usually pick on little fat kids, but bullies are always beaten when they pick on their own size.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

 I think we need to get used to living with a nuclear North Korea and increase trade with them.

NK doesn't want to be a member of the international community. Opening up its borders would show its population how much they've been cheated and mistreated by the Kim dynasty and elites.

Maybe "sunshine policy" would have worked in the 50's , but NK has dug itself into a hole too deep now to turn back.

The Kims only hope for regime survival is to keep holding the world at ransom and be rewarded for bad behavior.

Opening up to world or lashing out at it both mean the end for the regime.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Slimy China is making a show of concern, but actually they are delighted to see their barking attack dog make a nuisance of itself. This is how it gets back at the US for not allowing them to grab Taiwan.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

U.S. takes aim at countries doing business with N Korea...called for further sanctions

Except aiming at the very countries that is propping up N Korea: China and Russia. At least there won't be 100% sanctions against those countries. U.S. wouldn't dare risk offending either.

Asked whether Beijing would support tougher U.N. sanctions such as cutting off oil supplies to North Korea,

Of course not. China has big plans for a unified Korea with NK at the helm.

It has been suggested here that China needs to be forced to shut down NK. Forced in what manner? Boycott Chinese goods? China can always find buyers for its goods and services. Look at its so-called New Silk Road aka Belt and Road Action Plan, a $900 billion trade agreement program developed through infrastructure investments in emerging countries. With China funding infrastructure improvements, those countries will be obligated and dependent on China and voting with China.

Like it or not, China has the world by the cojones and sanctions won't make any difference.

Russia and China have both proposed a two-pronged approach: North Korea would suspend its nuclear and missile development, and the United States and South Korea would suspend their joint military exercises,

That was proposed before N Korea developed a hydrogen bomb and ICBM capabilities and rejected by the U.S.. Now China and Russia can up the ante by demanding U.S. to remove all its military forces from the north-east region in exchange for N Korea to suspend its nuclear and missile development and "imminent nuclear threats". "World opinion", ever fearful of a nuclear exchange and millions of casualties, will demand it.

Haley said North Korea's relentless actions show that its leader, Kim Jong Un, is "begging for war,"

Every time the U.S. uses military action, the U.S., (always a forgiving nation), will afterward rebuild North Korea, as it it rebuilt Germany, Japan, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, etc. Maybe that's what Kim wants; a new infrastructure and industry for his counry, furnished by the U.S.

Seriously, after exhausting sanctions and using military actions with thousands of casualties, "world opinion" will demand the U.S. to negotiate a peace treaty ending the standoff, help set up a unified Korea and withdraw U.S. military forces. But after the U.S. military withdraws, China will fill the vacuum and influence that new unified Korea to favor China.

In the end, North Korea and China will get what it wants: unification of the Korean Peninsula with a government favorable to China's ideological philosophy.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Maybe that's what Kim wants; a new infrastructure and industry for his counry, furnished by the U.S.

Kim is fully aware that regime collapse means getting the noose like Saddam, or an extrajudicial execution like Gaddafi.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

China can always find buyers for its goods and services. 

China's next buyers would not be able to pay the same prices for the products. If they could get better prices, they would already be selling the products there and not the U.S. So, the products would need to be tailored for a different market and would generate less profits. That is if the manufacturing base could be maintained as the new markets are developed. A large part of the Chinese manufacturing base would not survive, especially without Western development and economic support of that base.

Other suppliers would step up and fill the demand. There is a trend of this happening now with manufacturing developing in other AP countries like Vietnam and Thailand. If China is cut out of U.S. markets, then manufacturing would move and could move permanently.

China's main solution would be to increase demand locally, but that would take time and money that consumers in China do not have. So, sanctions would hurt China a lot.

Cutting off China trade has been called economic apocalypse. It would take the U.S. economy many decades to recover. So, it would hurt the U.S. a lot too. There may be an economic collapse in the U.S. or an extreme depression as the economy recovers from the change and changes its economy on a national level. That collapse would spread to the rest of the world.

China has the world by the cojones and sanctions won't make any difference.

China does have the world by the cojones, but in way similar to testicular cancer.

So, the only way this will happen is with limited and targeted sanctions that somehow do not run afoul of the WTO. These sanctions would roll into force over time to allow predictability and shifting in the manufacturing base. That would be more realistic and could be targeted with specific government investments. The U.S. could use NK as the excuse to start pulling out of the economic war China started decades ago. If Trump were somewhat competent (and he is not), I could see Trump actually doing this because it aligns with his nationalistic rhetoric.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

 we work so hard to peacefully resolve this issue ...

Haha, indeed China worked very hard to supply NK with oil against the strong and justified demands of the world community otherwise.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

HalwickToday 02:34 pm JSTU.S. takes aim at countries doing business with N Korea...called for further sanctions

It has been suggested here that China needs to be forced to shut down NK. Forced in what manner? Boycott Chinese goods? China can always find buyers for its goods and services. Look at its so-called New Silk Road aka Belt and Road Action Plan, a $900 billion trade agreement program developed through infrastructure investments in emerging countries. With China funding infrastructure improvements, those countries will be obligated and dependent on China and voting with China.

Like it or not, China has the world by the cojones and sanctions won't make any difference.

We are talking abut closing the U.S. market to Chinese imports. The US is the largest market for Chinese exports, followed by Japan and South Korea. In fact the volume of these top three outstrips all the beneficiaries of your New Silk Road. Dependency on one major country economically does not guarantee political support. The only way that China will "always find buyers" is from developing counties, but there the growth rate is nominal. China has for at least a decade seen their costs rising with Southeast Asian and South American countries eager to take their place among developed countries. China hardly has the "world by the cojones".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Enough is enough, the United States is facing from N Korea the same challenge Israel is facing from the PLO and the Arab partners. Talks have failed, Paying tribute has failed, sanctions have failed and yet the entire United Nations continues to prefer a "hear no, see no, no no" attitude when it comes to dealing with the Ongoing N Korean continued weapons development/testing and Threats. Once again the would is being reminded that to do nothing to prevent evil is to allow its growth. China is going to be real country Damage, more so than the United States should escalations continue.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

the United States is facing from N Korea the same challenge Israel is facing from the PLO 

The PLO !?

fake news.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hot air. Laughable.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Talks have failed, Paying tribute has failed, sanctions have failed and yet the entire United Nations continues to prefer a "hear no, see no, no no" attitude when it comes to dealing with the Ongoing N Korean

North Korea will make one more fireworks demonstration on or about Sept 9. The world will see sanctions has no effect on either North Korea or China. 

The world will grudgingly accept North Korea as a nuclear power and the standoff continues, but not before the "world opinion" and UN will demand peace talks with North Korea.  

This is what this whole grandstanding is about:  North Korea, with China and Russia backing, makes threats to world to get the UN, U.S. to go to the negotiation tables in Pyongyang. 

Only this time, with North Korea, with hydrogen bomb and ICBM capability, now has the leverage to make high demands.  Kim Jong-un has a good opportunity to accomplish what his predecessors were unable to do: "negotiate a new peace treaty under Pyongyang terms , complete withdrawal of U.S. military forces, unification of the two Koreas with a ruling government favorably aligned with China"

All this under the threat of thermonuclear warhead-carrying ICBM.

After the "crisis" dies down, UN will continue with a 'hear no, see no, no no" attitude where Korea, China and Russia is concerned.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I work in the field. We can keeps the lights on without the Chinese, thanks.

I also worked in Radio Shack

How about iPhones?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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