politics

A tale of two leaders in China and Japan

19 Comments
By Kelly Olsen

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© 2014 AFP

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19 Comments
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I think it's true that for all the talk about Abe being a right wing nationalist, Xi has equaled him in the same regard.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

“It seems that the two leaders are pursuing ghosts of the past instead of charting a new course for their countries.” this one sentence says it all.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Very obviously these two leaders have been actively and intentionally fueling bilateral tensions rather then pursuing healthy ties in their attempts to keep a firmer hold on power, distracting citizens from domestic ills. Their Machiavellian tactics could end very badly.

The two nations have so much more to gain from a positive relations.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Back when Abe was PM for a short period, Japan wasn't ready to accept the kind of changes he wanted to implement. But after 2010, the fishing boat ramming, the anti-Japan riots, and Senkaku issues, China created the perfect environment for Abe. Now Abe's actions serve as fuel for Xi's nationalism and military increase. You'd almost think these guys were secretly buddies or something.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

The last time China ever went to war by crossing their border was during the Korea conflict.

They have zero combat experience to date.

They lost.

They know this.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Great article. China and Japan are more alike than different, and more similar to each other than they are to the west. That's why all these foreigners who take the side of one or the other have misplaced support, because when it comes down to it, either of these leaders would happily step on the west given the chance.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

ludlt, Last time Japan surrendered in 1945. Since then, Japan has zero combat experience to date. Who will loss? You should know this?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Need to understand 'ACT' and 'REACT'. They are quite different.

Such as: after Japan ACTED to break off the decade long 'set islands (war loot) aside' agreement with China, then nationalized the islands and declared there is no dispute, China REACTED by sending more patrol ships and setting up its own ADIZ to cover the war loot (islands). Chinese REACTED by protests.

Such as: When Abe ACTED on public eye the famous Abe's 731 military jet photo to proudly remind Asians of Japan Unit 731 atrocities and when Abe ACTED to pay tribute at Yasukuni where 14 class A war criminals were enshrined, China, Chinese and people in some part of the world REACTED by condemning such actions.

@OssanAmerica, are you suggesting China should play dead and not REACT so as not to "creating the perfect environment for Abe"? LOL.

@ludit "They (China) have zero combat experience to date. They lost. They know this."

Isn't it a good thing to have zero combat experience? Or maybe not when you have opponent such as the revisionist Abe. Why would anyone then blame China to start learning it with military drills and stronger defence? Well, Ossan called it 'serve as fuel for Xi's nationalism and military increase'. On the other hand, what should one call Japan's nationalism and military increase when Japan already had vast combat experiences and under the protection of the world Empire?

@strangerland ' either of these leaders would happily step on the West given the chance'. If they are, they are just learning from the very best and you know who. Long way to go though and not in our lifetime unless the Empire is mounting on self-decay.

Misplaced support by foreigners? Who's talking? Does misplaced support also include protection agreement?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The last time China ever went to war by crossing their border was during the Korea conflict.

They have zero combat experience to date.

They lost.

They know this.

No the last time China took military action was in a series of border skirmishes with India which was fairly recently.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

good article and some positive, interesting comments. usually this kind of story, even in the UK's Financial Times has all sorts of poor comments attracted to it, much to my personal dissapointment

1 ( +1 / -0 )

21.century economics and 19.century politics Brave new world ( Eastasia style)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Plans to fight again.... for what, exactly? To ascertain who has the biggest dick? Or to confirm who are the biggest dickheads? Give me strength. This is 2014, not 1914.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Unlike after Tokyo nationalised some of the disputed islands in 2012, Abe’s shrine visit has not so far led to attacks on Japanese interests in China, Lam said, adding: “Economic ties are a very strong restraining factor in further deterioration.”

Obviously, the thugs are controlling by Communist Chinese Government. Otherwise, the thugs will rampage in the street and destroy cars that made by Japanese Companies and loot Japanese shops. Currently, Communist Chinese Government is trying to luring foreign investment for special economic zone and Government does not want it image tarnish by anti-Japanese businesses.

Whatever both Chinese leader and Japanese leader personality and their policy for country, two countries will not reconcile their differences in near future.

Chinese leaders need to understand and accept past can not be brought back and moving on with forgiveness. They must accept apology from other side with honest and stop playing politic with past. China and S. Korea was not only victim of Japanese Military during the war. There’re other victim countries in Asia. These victim countries’ Government and peoples are forgiven atrocity committed by Japanese Military during the war and moving on good and honest relation with today Japanese Government. Communist Chinese leaders and S. Korean Politicians must learn how their Asian neighbors forgive and moving on.

Obviously, S. Korean politicians and Communist Chinese leaders are trying to discriminate today Japanese Government with Japanese WWII criminal record at international stage. Also, S. Korean politicians and some of S. Korean peoples are jealous about Japan economy, technology and wealth.

Chinese leaders also must learn from Jewish, Homosexual, Disable peoples and Gypsy about how they forgive Germany and move on with their lives.

I hope future S. Korean leaders and Chinese leaders will try escape from their predecessors’ out of date political ideology, hatred and jealous by practicing honest policy in future.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Kelly Olsen wrote excellent article to let people know what kindof people are on top. It is easy to write name calling, without knowing background of those two leaders in Asia but Kelly's this article will open our eyes to know who they are and will be able to comment better here in future.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@ludlt - The last time China ever went to war by crossing their border was during the Korea conflict. They have zero combat experience to date. They lost. They know this.

You'll find that not many countries in this world are as aggressive or has as much invasive combat experience as the U.S.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

globallcJan. 05, 2014 - 03:27PM JST Need to understand 'ACT' and 'REACT'. They are quite different. Such as: after Japan ACTED to break off the decade long 'set islands (war loot) aside' agreement with China, then >nationalized the islands and declared there is no dispute, China REACTED by sending more patrol ships and setting >up its own ADIZ to cover the war loot (islands). Chinese REACTED by protests.

This is an example of selective events. China declared years ago that they intend to take full control of the entire South and East China Seas. China ACTED in sending the fishing trawler to the Senkakus with instructions to cause an international incident in 2010.EVerything after that has been a REACTION to China's aggression.

@OssanAmerica, are you suggesting China should play dead and not REACT so as not to "creating the perfect >environment for Abe"? LOL.

I am suggesting that China looks like fools to be whining about Japan responding to China's threatening posture, which has all of Asia up in arms. China started it all and then complains about everyone's REACTIONS.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Describing China's military as the "world's largest" is close to meaningless, unless you simply want to defend your homeland against invasion.

It's very much like those neo-cons in the US who cry because the US Navy has fewer ships than during the presidency of Reagan, without understanding the difference in capabilities of those ships and support forces. As to China's one aircraft carrier, there is a huge gap between refitting that Ukranian carrier for operations, and successfully launching and recovering sorties of fighters and attack aircraft, on a regular basis.

China could certainly do damage to Japan, and South Korea, and Philippines, and Vietnam, but they would risk far greater damage to their own military complexes and major industrial cities, and that would end the Chinese progression toward world domination by economic power.

Therefore, even if they had a military half as powerful as the US - and they are decades away from that - they would not risk serious military action. Yes, there could be some low scale miscalculations by China, or by Japan, but I doubt it would lead to serious military conflict.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Good point. I think by 'world's largest' they simply mean troop numbers. The US military is by far the largest when it comes to war machines.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Xi's main goal is economy. He must deliver good growth to remain legitimate. So he will do that. He wants to make deals with the US. Japan is a nuisance, not a main issue.

Abe's main goal is to counter China. He must appear "tough" to remain popular, so he builds anti-China alliance, and visits the war shrine. China is his main issue, but China refuses to talk to him, unless to discuss the disputed island. So he sucks up hard to the US. But the US is not interested in him any more. They want to replace him.

So the best thing for Japan is Xi remains in power. And the best thing for China is Abe remains in power.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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