politics

Abe eyes new action plan to boost tourism to Japan

59 Comments

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Saturday that he will order the relevant ministries to come up with a new action plan to increase the number of tourists to Japan.

Abe made his comments to reporters after a visit to Koyasan (Mt Koya) in Wakayama Prefecture, Fuji TV reported. Known as the headquarters of the Koyasan Shingon sect of Buddhism, Koyasan has become a popular tourist spot in recent years.

Abe said he wants to make tourism one of the main engines driving Japan's economic growth. He said one of the keys to doing this is encouraging tourists to visit places outside the main cities in Japan, such as Koyasan.

He said Japan needs more duty free shops in regional areas and also called for faster immigration and customs procedures.

The number of foreign visitors to Japan in 2014 was 13,410,000, up 29.4% over 2013. The highest number came from Taiwan (up 28% to 2,829,800), followed by South Korea with 2,755,300 (up 12.2%) and China -- which had the biggest jump at 83.3% -- with 2,409,200 visitors.

Tourism officials attribute the hike in tourism numbers to the weak yen, more international flights in and out of Haneda Airport, as well as the easing of visa regulations for countries in Southeast Asia.

Agency officials also noted that from Oct 1, the list of duty-free products was expanded leading to a increase in sales at department and other stores of over 2.4 times compared to last last year.

The Japan Tourism Agency predicts that numbers of foreign tourists will continue to climb this year as well, likely exceeding 15 million.

Officials from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and Transport say that by the time of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, the total number of foreign visitors will finally reach and or exceed 20 million.

© japan Today

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

59 Comments
Login to comment

Easy! Close all the US bases in Okinawa and use the land for tourism redevelopment.

With the perfect climate beautiful seas, great food and wonderful people, Okinawa is a tourist paradise.

And we'd much rather have loads of people having fun and enjoying themselves than than heavily guarded enclosures with gun carrying military types peering at passersby suspiciously.

The military is just so dark and gloomy!

-3 ( +18 / -21 )

If he really wants to encourage tourism, he should stop promoting his extreme right-wing agenda, which offends the Chinese and Koreans that make up a large part of the increase in tourism.

14 ( +22 / -8 )

gaijintraveller

You're wrong. As the story indicates, the numbers of Chinese and South Korean tourists have soared. They couldn't care less about Abe's agenda. As long as the yen is cheap, they'll keep coming.

5 ( +14 / -9 )

Easy! Close all the US bases in Okinawa and use the land for tourism redevelopment.

There is more to Japan than just Okinawa and you often seem to forget the actually numbers too. Tourism to Okinawa has jumped even with the bases here. Okinawa had over 7 Million tourists last year, with nearly 1 Million of them coming from foreign countries.

The bases are not the problem as they will never be developed for tourists, just another bed town or AEON mall, there is plenty of evidence that already supports that fact.

Abe is right in trying to increase tourism, but to do it right the country has to educate the population about diversity, and that is not something even close to being on the horizon either with his nationalistic stance towards everything else.

5 ( +16 / -11 )

Abe said he wants to make tourism one of the main engines driving Japan’s economic growth.

LOL. France has about 85.0 million visitors a year, and the U.S. about 70.0 million. Japan's 13.4 million is just a fraction of those countries. Hell, Japan is #6 just in Asia. Sorry, but the horse has left the barn to a great degree for Japanese tourism, as China is the place to go now, and places like Thailand have much better beaches, no matter what happens in Okinawa. Hope they continue to show growth, but making it "one of the main engines" is simply unrealistic.

8 ( +19 / -12 )

@Bertie: Abe came to So Calif He must noticed so many tourists like people there.

About tourists, because China restricted Chinese to visit Macao, now Vegas is full of Chinese tourists. Other states invitem too but we have advantage of hot weather, like So Calif. If some bases are closed, maybe Okinawa may have sport teams? How about branches of Hollywood?

0 ( +2 / -1 )

LOL. France has about 85.0 million visitors a year, and the U.S. about 70.0 million.

The huge US loses to a small European country. Lol.

-3 ( +11 / -13 )

Japan needs more hotels that will accommodate families. Too many will not accept two adults and two children in one room, even in Tokyo and Osaka. So Japan loses out on that lucrative tourist market. In contrast, walk around Manhattan and there are families from all over the world taking in the sights and spending money.

17 ( +20 / -3 )

@Suzuq]1 In Tokyo, Hilton . When tourists increase, the hotel business will not miss a chance tu expabd.

4 ( +6 / -1 )

They also need easy of access to/from the airport. It's take me 2 hours to get to the airport. That ridiculous. Both Narita and Kansai International airport should have better and faster trains connecting them to the city.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

It'll never happen to the extent that it has in other nations. Abe can't just say "make it so" and it'll happen, and the ONLY reason it's picked up recently is because of the intentional (despite him denying it so that the US won't be on his back) devaluation of the currency, which has put a lot of medium-sized businesses, especially importers, out of business. Unless he drops prices on everything, like hotels, he can't further increase tourism. He would first need to drastically reduce the cost of flights and hotels. Can't do that because landing costs are the highest in the world after all the unnecessary construction, and hotels, as mentioned, won't allow separate rooms for children.

Finally, and most importantly, if Abe wants more and more people to come to this nation and truly be welcomed, he needs to work on a Japan that truly welcomes them. Not a SINGLE day has gone by, save that I have not come into contact with others when I had a cold (and even then there was news or posts about it), that I haven't heard whining and complaining about the number of Chinese and Koreans at tourists sites. Just yesterday there was a news story about how a tour group of 1600 or so Chinese tourists went to France on a company retreat and held some special events there, and the net result for France for that trip alone was some 2 billion yen in tourism. That person's comment? "I was amazed... but I never want them to come to Japan."

Until that changes, it'll never increase to the point where Japan can compete even within Asia because there would be a backlash.

13 ( +20 / -7 )

Yeah smith I find it kinda funny that Japanese cant see THEMSELVES in the current wave of Chinese etc coming to Japan, just like when the Japanese first starting heading outta NRT in droves LOL!!!

I keep telling my wife to simply enjoy the scenes as some are pretty hilarious! As for the rude ones, hey you gotta take the ugly with the good, the world has put up with yanks for decades now LOL!!!

5 ( +10 / -5 )

I often visit a supermarket in the basement of Shin Kobe station and its full of mostly chinese tourists spending all there holiday money. 1 way to increase tourism is to help the natives understand that tourism is an important part of the economy as the staff and other customers are amazingly rude and short with these visiter even if some of the tourist are a little overly vocal. Being a bit more tolerant and understand would be nice to see, especially when the Japanese are pretty shocking travelers themselves.

6 ( +9 / -4 )

Reza, airport access to the center of Tokyo and Osaka used to be a big problem, but since the trains now go directly to the terminals at Narita and Kansai International, getting back into town is not so inconvenient as it was in the past.

Anyway, in the end it's not going to be easy to attract tourists to Japan from outside eastern Asia. The issue of air fares is one that can't be easily overcome, since flying to Japan from western Europe, North America and even Australia/New Zealand is fairly expensive even with advance purchase tickets--and low-cost European tour operators aren't that interested in package tours to Japan from western Europe (I mean, do we see TUI Group charter airlines fly from European cities to Japan?).

5 ( +5 / -0 )

****japan needs easy aproval for visas. Thats it!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think that tourism could be a wonderful but small part of the Japanese Economy. As I am sure all of us who frequent this sight know there are plenty of wonderful thing to see across our wonderful country. Some of these things are naturally beautiful and some man-made, and some a combination of the man-made things in a beautiful natural setting.

I think that one of the biggest incentives to visit this country would be simultaneously the biggest help in overcoming some of the difficulties that tourists face. If Japan were to make it easier for foreigners to move to Japan then their own families would have reason to visit them, and when they do visit them the difficulties of language would be negated because the family member who is hosting them would be able to act as a guide for the visitors.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Because of the loss of tourism in Iwate prefecture (3/11), I spent three months putting together some good ideas to improve their situation, including budgets and implementation plans. I met with the dean of one of the local universities that have hospitality programs and presented my ideas. He loved them and said they were right on track, but to not expect a positive response. He was right on, I called the head of tourism for Iwate prefecture and she responded without ever seeing what I had, with I am not interested. It was obvious she did not want any help from an outsider. Before the earthquake they averaged 300,000 foreign visitors and now only 100,000. You would think that they would be open to suggestions, but her pride would not let that happen. If this is the normal response with other prefectures then the central government will not be successful once the yen comes back to normal.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

It sure would be nice to be able to stay in a hotel room and be charged by the room and not by the # of people.

That would make my stays only about 5,000 yen rather than 20,000 per night. I'd travel more.

Abe should talk to that ministry and yell at them about this.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

For those of you complaining the Japanese were "cold" towards you when you visited, did you even bother looking at your own actions? The Japanese were very warm and welcoming to me because I looked some things up before heading over, such as not handing people money, but putting it in the tray, what side to stand on the escalators, what side to walk on the escalators, bowing, basic speech like hello, thank you, you first, and getting up on the train to let the elderly or those with children sit, flu masks, etc. A lot of the times you will get a "cold" response simply because you are standing out and not making the effort to accommodate them when they are accommodating you by allowing you in their country. Meet them halfway at least. I know Americans complain when foreigners come into the country, so it's really not any different.

-2 ( +10 / -12 )

Not a SINGLE day has gone by, save that I have not come into contact with others when I had a cold (and even then there was news or posts about it), that I haven't heard whining and complaining about the number of Chinese and Koreans at tourists sites.

I hear the same thing on a daily basis from my Japanese students and friends, and yet I also hear (and witness) from foreign tourists about the kindness of Japanese people, who are more than willing to give them directions, or assist them when buying train tickets and the like.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

a cousin of mine was denied of visa a couple months ago with complete documents...we suspected the reason is the financial capability he declared # US 12000------

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Saturday that he will order the relevant ministries to come up with a new action plan to increase the number of tourists to Japan....The number of foreign visitors to Japan in 2014 was 13,410,000, up 29.4%over 2013."

Gosh, how many more tourists does Japan need?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It'll never happen to the extent that it has in other nations. Abe can't just say "make it so" and it'll happen

Japan knows it can't happen to the extent that it has in other nations, indeed their target is 20 millions, not 60 or 70 millions. But the reasons why it can't happen, aren't the fact Japanese people are so much more unfriendly and impolite towards foreigners than others, here you have the usual Japan bashing so dear to some users. Tourists are often seen as "annoying" by the locals in all the countries around the world, even if they are necessary. The main reasons are the following ones, despite how beautiful and attractive Japan is:

a) Japan is an insular country. Insular countries have always less tourists than the ones connected to mainland, of course. UK has less than 30 millions of tourists, even though it is a country where English is the main language, and a multicultural one.

b) Perception of the fact everything is too expensive. This idea is hard to be fought, at least in Europe. It is still actually expensive compared to other countries.

c) Earthquakes. Tons of people became also more conscious about this problem after 3/11, of course. And there are also the fears linked to the Fukushima accident. On Farnesina site (Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs) about traveling, Japan is listed like one of the most dangerous countries in the world, because of its high seismic risk. If you think this isn't something that people consider when they plan a travel you are naive. Japan is so much loved in Italy, but to tons of people it remains a dream for all the reasons I said.

Finally, about Japan being tourist-unfriendly, apparently it's not like that according to the latest World Economic Forum’s biennial travel and tourism competitiveness report, indeed it is in the top ten of the most tourism friendly countries:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/05/12/the-worlds-10-most-tourism-friendly-countries/

I chose an American site like source, because if I chose a Japanese one someone could call me biased (even though I'm Italian). If you want to read the whole report, it's here http://www3.weforum.org/docs/TT15/WEF_Global_Travel&Tourism_Report_2015.pdf

and about Japan it says something very interesting despite what many of you guys think:

Japan’s human resources (15th) are highly qualified and excel in terms of treatment of customers, where Japan is ranked 1st globally

While this is the negative point:

On a less positive note, Japan is not a price-competitive destination (119th)

2 ( +4 / -2 )

jerseyboy; The US and France have a large immigrant population which is the obvious source of information and connection among different nations. family visits, friends to friends visits,business trips,study tours are easy as compare to Japan. apart from official hurdles japan needs to change their attitude towards the foreigners, simply if they just going to target only their pockets it is not going to work.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Good old Abe - if all else fails come up with the old tried and true tourism ace!

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

It sure would be nice to be able to stay in a hotel room and be charged by the room and not by the # of people.

I hate that. Everywhere else in the world charges by room, and while there is sometimes a surcharge for additional guests in a room, the price is not multiplied by the number of guests.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Suzu

Japan needs more hotels that will accommodate families. Too many will not accept two adults and two children in one room, even in Tokyo and Osaka. So Japan loses out on that lucrative tourist market. In contrast, walk around Manhattan and there are families from all over the world taking in the sights and spending money.

Exactly, this is the very reason my family chose not to come here this year, hotels for families are just too expensive (even Dubai of all places was significantly more affordable).

Just because there are increasing numbers of Chinese tourists coming for shopping doesn't mean that tourism in Japan is healthy. If the Chinese economy tanks then Japan is right back where it started. A healthy robust tourism industry is needed. Also, tourism isn't just about shopping, so even if Abe wants more duty free shops in regional centres it won't do much. Tourists want activities to do & places to see. Shopping based tourism will only ever attract the kind of tourist which rile Japanese people, ie loud pushy obnoxious ones.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

If Abe really intends to increase the number of visitors to Japan, the government should consider a policy of English language proficiency regarding those who work in the customer service industry. As has been noted already, Japan lags far behind other Asian countries. From personal experience, I've found convenience store clerks in eg. Thailand,Cambodia, Vietnam and Taiwan, to name a few countries, to be far more fluent than anybody in Japan. Just the other day I witnessed a Matsuya worker desperately trying, and to no avail, to explain to a group of Chinese tourists that they needed to purchase a ticket from the machine. And let's face it. The vast majority of Japanese have no real need for English, or any other language, in Japan. And they know this. Until this way of thinking is reframed, Japan will never really be a major tourist destination.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

But in all seriousness if Abe really intends to increase the number of visitors to Japan, the government should consider a policy of English language proficiency regarding those who work in the customer service industry. As has been noted already, Japan lags far behind other Asian countries.

If English was the main problem, France and Italy wouldn't have better numbers than UK. And both in France and Italy our level of English is mediocre. In France specially for nationalistic reasons, in Italy probably both because of our teaching methods and cultural custom of dubbing foreign movies and shows.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Yes but at least in France and Italy they are willing to use the English language when they have to. This has nothing to do with English teaching methods and everything to do with making a conscious effort to communicate with foreign visitors. People in Italy and France, and most countries, don't shy away with a ''wakaranai'' ''shoganai'' attitude when confronted by a foreign visitor.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

People in Italy and France, and most countries, don't shy away with a ''wakaranai'' ''shoganai'' attitude when confronted by a foreign visitor.

They say "Sorry I no spik English" and leave. I don't know which stereotype you have in your mind.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Japan is a nice place to live. But I wouldn't want to visit.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

at least in France and Italy they are willing to use the English language when they have to. This has nothing to do with English teaching methods and everything to do with making a conscious effort to communicate with foreign visitors. People in Italy and France, and most countries, don't shy away with a ''wakaranai'' ''shoganai'' attitude when confronted by a foreign visitor.

Have you been to any of the countries in question? I had exactly the 'I don't understand English' response in both France and Italy, and plenty of people trying to help me in not so good English in Japan. In all countries, it depends on the person. There isn't a blanket statement that could be made about any of these countries that would be close to accurate.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Just to be clear, I'm not refering to the average French, Italian person in the street. I'm talking about those who work in the tourism, customer service industry. At Kansai airport's immigration I've often seen immigration officials struggle trying to explain to foreign visitors where they should stand. This would never be the case anywhere else. I bet the '' Sorry I no spik English'' is not so much to do with ''I don't understand'' but rather a ''I don't care'' attitude. And just to reiterate my previous point concerning English language education and communication, I've spoken with orphaned kids in Cambodia who spoke fluent English, but have never been to school.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

This would never be the case anywhere else.

Yeah, sure, think whatever you want.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@observerhereMAY. 17, 2015 - 05:28PM JST a cousin of mine was denied of visa a couple months ago with complete documents...we suspected the reason is the financial capability he declared # US 12000------

US people apply US visa. Japanese apply Ja[anese visa. US does background check as some people go on drug business oversea.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I heard PM Abe has appointed Mizutani to a special Gaijin welcoming committed. Can anyone verify?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

jerseyboy; The US and France have a large immigrant population which is the obvious source of information and connection among different nations.

Ali -- Nice theory. Have any numbers to support it? But, just for reference -- are all those Japanese tourists flocking to Hawaii and LA, and Vegas every year going to visit relatives? Or how about the Chinese ones? Maybe you should have given it some more thought.

-11 ( +0 / -11 )

Tourism is already doing quite well. The moment the government starts getting involved they are likely to screw it all up, like they have with everything else they have tried to "help".

What this probably means is that they will eventually regulate tourism in such a way that Japan's conglomerates get most of the pie. Mitsubishi and Mitsui will be the main hotel and transportation operators, and their subsidiaries will work on taking over the rest. Business as usual, Japanese style.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@jerseyboy: I don;t have numbers but I hardly see Japanese tourists in Vegas. Just Chinese billlionairtes and millionaires came back to bet on table games.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@toshiko; my cousin was applying for Japan Visa with no derogatory record...very very clean personality

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The quickest fix the government could do would be to ensure that all Japanese are not just allowed to but obligated to take their annual holidays in order to increase domestic tourism.

Start by matching France or Germany's 24 day/5 week allowance (plus public holidays) and punish companies not allow employees to take them.

The worse fix is if they start pursuing Asian gambling money, as with the mega casino resorts looming in the background.

The truth is, Japan is not a great tourist destination for most people, especially families for a number of very simple, rational reasons rather than the nutjob xenophobic ones given above.

Expense, geographic location surrounded by poorer/less developed nations, lack of beaches and beaches culture, and the rather homogenous modern architecture which, as far as history and heritage goes, there's a say that "what the Americans did not destroy during WWII, the Japanese property developers have done since the 1970s".

You cannot compare it to France, as France it is surrounded by comparably wealthy and developed nations which whom it shares road and rail links and long holidays (and you can thank French government's surrender in WWII for saving its architectural heritage).

There are also the differences in culture and sociology between the France's and Japanese's neighbours, e.g. Japan's neighbours tend to come to Japan for high end shopping not cultural activities. Whereas for Westerners, temples and shrines might be on their list, to neighbouring Asians, they are no big thing. Unfortunately, it's just too far away for Westerners/Europeans to holiday to in the way, say, other European nations are.

Jerseyboy shoots his own foot including Hawaii. Yes, Japanese go to Hawaii because there is a big Japanese emigrant population there and their tastes and sensibilities can be catered for.

Prejudices against 'mass tourism' from China and Korea and, sadly, fairly well grounded. The cultures are too different. I've felt it myself and Japanese are not unique for complaining about it ... try speaking to a native Venetian about 'mass tourism' to Venice. Again, having seen the difference over the years, I'd agree with them too.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@observerhereMAY. 17, 2015 - 11:12PM JST @toshiko; my cousin was applying for Japan Visa with no derogatory record...very very clean personali\

Sorry, I thought your cousin is American trying to visit Japan as Japan use yen. Maybe you are right only US $12,000 asset could be reason if his desrination is USA.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@Howaiti "Japan is a nice place to live. But I wouldn't want to visit."

for me its the other way around :)

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@Luce-A: perfect post.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

and a low Yen, wont get the tourist if the Yens at 80~90Y/$1, so im guessing itll stay low for some time yet. sorry to all those import lovers and J wages being repatriated back home

0 ( +0 / -0 )

omg BertieWoosterM u just read my mind. i was just gonna say close the bases in okinawa bc the beach there is faboulas. i wanted to visit okinawa so badly bc its a cool japanese tropical island with lots of history and awesome catsles and shines. besides its a warm spot, who wants to visit cold countries for summer vacation? we walll wanna visit warm tropical islands like the carribean. besides the city centre of okinawa can become like maiami or hong kong with nice beaches around to visit and resourts near castles

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@Luce-A: I only want to say that Chinese and Korean tourists aren't annoying in particular, I don't share this point with you, but it's absolutely true that "mass tourism" is always seen like annoying by the locals, everywhere, it's not peculiar of Japanese people consider tourists disturbing to some extent. Where I live it's plenty of tourists and it's obvious that while my city need them, our daily life become more tiring during summer, with mass tourism. Also simple stuff like shopping in a supermarket becomes more stressful and slow.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@BertieWoosterMAY. 17, 2015 - 07:01AM JST Easy! Close all the US bases in Okinawa and use the land for tourism redevelopment.

Japan qill have extra $ w+ bollopm s uear/ Hpw about convince Nippon Hotel Kyokai member to borrow these money to create high rise hotels along beach side in Okinawa to rure tourists? Just queen size beds will satisty as Asian people are not huge. Not yadoya but hotels. Better than Oulura of Hilton in Tokyo

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sorry, but the horse has left the barn to a great degree for Japanese tourism

Then why has the number of tourists to Japan increased at the fastest rate in Asia since 2011?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

The number of foreign visitors to Japan in 2014 was 13,410,000, up 29.4% over 2013. The highest number came from Taiwan (up 28% to 2,829,800), followed by South Korea with 2,755,300 (up 12.2%) and China—which had the biggest jump at 83.3%—with 2,409,200 visitors.

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

Japan is looking for Asian tourists. Their countries are wealthy. too. Read JT business section how much these country own US debts.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When I think of "foreign visitors" coming to Japan, I think of Europeans, North Americans, NZ, Australians.

The Chinese, Korean & Taiwanese are too familiar visiting a place with rice, a pair of chopsticks and Kanji signs- (all of which aren't so foreign at all).

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Alex80May. 17, 2015 - 05:59PM JST

c) Earthquakes. Tons of people became also more conscious about this problem after 3/11, of course. And there are also the fears linked to the Fukushima accident. On Farnesina site (Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs) about traveling, Japan is listed like one of the most dangerous countries in the world, because of its high seismic risk.

I think you made a very good point.

But on second thought, isn't Italy as risky as Japan in terms of earthquakes?

http://earthquaketrack.com/p/italy/recent

2 ( +3 / -1 )

A couple of things they could is encourage more airports to take on more international flights outside from outside of Asia and not destined to Tokyo or Osaka. With most of the Air traffic going through those two, it's very little wonder why tourist only flock to Tokyo and Kansai. Another thing they can do is promote is promote regional areas by spending 'smart' money on informing the public about the particular uniqueness of each area through foreign films. Invite foreigners to film in these regions and heavily discount the fees to do so if the city is promoted in some way is great way to build awareness.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@CH3CHO: Italy is our country not a travel destination for us. I mean we can try to avoid eartquakes at least on holiday...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wc626,

When I think of "foreign visitors" coming to Japan, I think of Europeans, North Americans, NZ, Australians.

The Chinese, Korean & Taiwanese are too familiar visiting a place with rice, a pair of chopsticks and Kanji signs- (all of which aren't so foreign at all).

Did you really mean this, or is it some kind of joke/complicated sarcasm?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Abe might have eyes to create tourism mecca in Okinawa. He visited Hawaii and So Calif. Also he had a chance to hear Dem lawmakers who complained US military oversea. He pretended he does not know English by struggling to read manuscript and listened to DEM anti war lawmakers. In Silicon Valley and So, CA, he had no English problem. He might use Okinawa demo as an excuse to rehabilitate Okinawa,

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I !ile living in western Tokyo but hardly ever venture into areas where many tourists are or even close to the Yamanote line/center or town.

So no real impact on me.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Tokyo is too cold for tourists. Abe's home prefecture, beach area - Seto Nailai is warm and hardky snow. There are many warn areas in So Japan. Okinawa tourism 8s as good as So CA, If Hollywood movie studios can create their playground in Okinawa, who knows Maybe Okinawa Disneyland? (t created Disneyland in Anaheim. Later more warm Florida for DisneyWorld. Anaheim is not warm enough. Watch out Disney and others.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites