politics

Amari says TPP agreement difficult by year-end

13 Comments

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13 Comments
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It's not difficult, it's impossible.

It's not even a good idea.

Forget it!

0 ( +7 / -5 )

Darn straight, Bertie!

It's Corporate Fascism in Secrecy!!

-2 ( +4 / -4 )

why so negative? good chance to bust the vested interests and break up Nokyo

1 ( +3 / -3 )

America does not want to force the Japanese to buy U.S. goods. We just want that door of free trade to swing both ways. Our corporations do not enjoy the same unrestricted trade that Japanese corporations do in America.

0 ( +2 / -4 )

I wonder if Japan really needs TPP. I think TPP only gives huge companies the chance to be bigger, and it is against the local-production-for-local consumption policy which the government is going to promote for regional vitalization. Although the government may expect the increase in tax revenue by TPP, gaps between the haves and the have-nots will widen, and many people's life will become tough. Perhaps every country considers this, so we can’t compromise easily. TPP is difficult.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@emonsen

why so negative? good chance to bust the vested interests and break up Nokyo

If the agreement really busted up "vested interests", more people might be in favour of it, but since it was written in secret by and for very invested giant corporations, not at all for so-called free-market mechanisms, with no real public involvement or disclosure, how could anyone who values local sovereignty and social justice support this?

@CrazyJoe

Our corporations do not enjoy the same unrestricted trade that Japanese corporations do in America.

How can you align yourself and feel some kind of national identity with a multinational or transnational corporation, which by their very operations show they care little or nothing for the place of their origin or registration. They offshore jobs, offshore profits to avoid tax payments, help write trade agreements that weaken core national values of democracy, local initiative and sovereignty and they work against so-called free-market principles by gaming the political system to give themselves huge market advantages. The discourse should not be about one country's corporations vs another, but about huge corporations vs the workers and citizens of all countries.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

large corporations want to get larger, at the expense of people and nations. TPP isn't worth it.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

How can you align yourself and feel some kind of national identity with a multinational or transnational corporation, which by their very operations show they care little or nothing for the place of their origin or registration. They offshore jobs, offshore profits to avoid tax payments, help write trade agreements that weaken core national values of democracy, local initiative and sovereignty and they work against so-called free-market principles by gaming the political system to give themselves huge market advantages. The discourse should not be about one country's corporations vs another, but about huge corporations vs the workers and citizens of all countries.

warispeace -- thank you for the socialist manifesto, but I'll side with Crazy Joe. We are "alinging" ourselves with American corporations and the TPP, because we believe in the benefits of free trade and pure capitalism -- the strong survive. All you are promoting is using society's resources to support un-competive, inefficent companies for some sort of collective good. Which is pure hogwash. You are against TPP, as is most of Japan, because they know they have become so bloated and dependent on government spending to survive, that facing true competition would just hasten their demise -- just look at the share of market of Japan's electronic firms inside Japn versus worldwide. If you want to protect Japan's markets, just come out and say so, but don't make a straw-dog argument against multinationals that have figured ways to be as efficient with the shareholders' value as possible, and not pay little heed to it like J-companies do.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

This is Japan's idea of globalisation; Export as many Japanese products as possible, but do not allow foreign products into the Japanese market. Japan's economy will never recover from the inside cos there is too much debt in this country to make it work. Japan needs international trade and cheaper non-price-fixed goods to increase spending and the get economy into recovery. Printing money and increasing taxes is only making the situation worse and will push Japan from a recession into a depression cos everybody will be broke - except the 3% of money hoarding bureaucrats, of course. This so-called 'stalemate' is not a stalemate at all! It is Japan refusing to lift its price fixing practices on agricultural goods. If they lifted their subsidies on rice farming unemployment would skyrocket cos all these farmers being paid not to grow rice would have to get a real job.

1 ( +2 / -3 )

TPP is not good because there are too many countries and too difficult compromises. Individual two-country free trade seems better than TPP. It would take next 100 years to reach the perfect agreement.

0 ( +4 / -2 )

TPP is a litany of lopsided protectionism for certain parties and on the whole for consumers is a terrible machination.

0 ( +4 / -2 )

TPP is neither free and nor open so Asian people don't welcome it!

0 ( +2 / -1 )

Economics can be one of the useful weapons against aggressors,,countries individually may not be ready or strong enough to impose economic sanctions as time may require,,but might be stronger collectively. Having a playing field that is fairer for all participants, private or public enterprises across borders can be one indicator as well for moving forward. With the emergence of new technologies, perhaps ways of doing business should also reform itself to adapt to those changes.

0 ( +0 / -1 )

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