politics

Asia has wary welcome for G7's answer to Belt and Road

10 Comments
By Bernadette Christina and Aradhana Aravindan

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10 Comments
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Nobody doubts that China has a 50 yr plan.

Western countries are doing well with a 50 month plan, until the next politician is elected and undoes everything the prior person did.

How many local workers do Chinese infrastructure projects hire? For some reason, I thought they imported most of the labor used from China, even for brick carriers.

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Western countries are doing well with a 50 month plan, until the next politician is elected and undoes everything the prior person did.

That's more of a problem in America due to the structure of their government.

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The Belt and Road initiative: The Chinese govt lends your govt money for a facility built by contractors affiliated with the CCP and Chinese labor at greatly inflated prices, and when you default, we own a piece of your country, or natural resources, or mineral/timber rights, or...

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They threw mud and resisted the Chinese BBI just because it's the Chinese doing it. Now, they are aping the Chinese by their Build Back Better..someone said something about .. ...being the best compliment ? If only there was cooperation instead of confrontation, the world would be a better place.

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So what's the G7's answer to this new Silk Road? An extra shipping lane between Europe and North America?

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Like Nord Stream2, America is a loser again.

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If you want B3W you want to be inclusive, not exclusive.

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Build Back Better World initiative

As rotten as the BRI is, Asia ought to be wary of B3W as well.

Using the same slogan bandied about by Boris, Biden and an assortment of other politicians of dubious provenance and intent, this Build Back Better stuff comes straight from the percolating bowels of the World Economic Forum's PR office. The same WEF populated by corporations and hangers-on whose commitment to democracy, sovereignty and free speech is only slightly less tenuous than that of the CCP. The same folks who pushed lockdowns and have increased their wealth tremendously during the pandemic at the expense of people's health, freedom and prosperity.

"For sensitive infrastructure such as telecoms and strategically located ports, however, it will continue to be either/or and they'll be under pressure to make the 'right' choice."

Yep.

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That's more of a problem in America due to the structure of their government.

The places with the most consistent govts are those with dictators or "elected for life" leaders ... Russia/China/NK/Cuba/Venezuela/Iran/Syria/Belarus. Don't think we want that either.

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The places with the most consistent govts are those with dictators or "elected for life" leaders ... Russia/China/NK/Cuba/Venezuela/Iran/Syria/Belarus. Don't think we want that either.

Except dictatorships never last. They appear stable but are very brittle. When stressed enough they generally fail. The oldest continuous governments on Earth are elected governments. The great virtue of elected representative government is that bad plans can be changed or abandoned by voting in different representatives. Xi Jinping for example is telling China that private companies must look to big state owned enterprises in their line of work for leadership. If that doesn't work out, which I highly suspect, the Chinese have no means to affect change. Mr. Xi is not subject to the popular vote. He could run China into the ground like Mao did and the Chinese people are helpless to get rid of him. In an elected representative government an administration and legislature with failed or failing policies can be voted out and new policies instituted. Representative turn over is regular and new blood brings in new ideas. This is their great strength,

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