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California apologizes for Japanese-American internment

22 Comments
By CUNEYT DIL

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22 Comments
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We need to remind them that this can't happen again,” she said.

Unfortunately I for one think, in the current political climate of the US, it very well could, happen again that is, intern people against their will for doing nothing more than crossing a line in the sand.

Wait, it already IS happening!

-4 ( +10 / -14 )

“We need to remind them that this can't happen again,” she said.

This message needs to be amplified with the spread of far right nationalistic, race based movements. Despots know to divide and conquer they need to create 'enemy' groups for their followers to fear and vent their anger and frustrations on so they can keep their followers riled up and furher unite them behind their regime.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

In 1988, President Regan signed the Civil Liberties Act to compensate mor than 100,000 people of Japanese descent who were incarcerated in internment camps during World War 11. The legislation offered formal apology and paid out $20,000 in compensation to each surviving victim. So like Korean comfort women no further apology needed or should be given.

-1 ( +10 / -11 )

State of California apology with no compensation. I'm cool with this, but it does sound like a waste of time and money as an apology which included the state of California had already been given.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Don't forget.

Don't let it happen again to anyone legally in the USA.

Please don't compare intern camps for Japanese legal immigrants AND US citizens to the people illegally inside the USA today. The Japanese didn't break any US law.

Legal immigrants are welcome to the US.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

And please don't compare what the Imperial Japanese dictatorship did during the war to what we did to American born American citizens loyal to the United States. Admitting fault and learning from our mistakes is the only way to avoid repeating them in the future.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

It made perfect sense to the USA to intern them after they were attacked. What they didn't know at the time was how fanatical the Japanese were, but they found out eventually. They took the approach of better safe than sorry, and during a war, this is even more true.

-10 ( +6 / -16 )

This message needs to be amplified with the spread of far right nationalistic, race based movements. Despots know to divide and conquer they need to create 'enemy' groups for their followers to fear and vent their anger and frustrations on so they can keep their followers riled up and furher unite them behind their regime.

Something like what you are doing? What the next step? Putting these evil right wingers in camps?

People never learn.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Here is the actual resolution;

https://www.legiscan.com/CA/text/AR77/2019

It reads like a virtue signal with no ramifications for it passing or failing.

I wonder if the Internment camps will be taught in the American history curriculum of California k-12 schools? Realistically, I'm thinking grades 6-12. If that change isn't made or hasn't been made, the resolution is as useful as a politician's smile.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I wonder if the Internment camps will be taught in the American history curriculum of California k-12 schools?

it was taught when I attended California schools in the 80’s and 90’s, and a quick google search show the governor signed a bill to expand the curriculum in 2017

2 ( +3 / -1 )

It made perfect sense to the USA to intern them after they were attacked. What they didn't know at the time was how fanatical the Japanese were, but they found out eventually. They took the approach of better safe than sorry, and during a war, this is even more true.

It really doesn't make perfect sense for a nation to intern its own citizens because of their heritage, religion or race.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It made perfect sense to the USA to intern them after they were attacked. What they didn't know at the time was how fanatical the Japanese were, but they found out eventually. They took the approach of better safe than sorry, and during a war, this is even more true.

Ah yes, which is why the 442nd RCT (Go For Broke), comprised entirely of Nisei, became the most decorated unit in history, their 3 battalions earning 4000 Bronze Stars and 9,500 Purple Hearts in less than 2 years. Oh, and 21 Congressional Medals of Honor.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/442nd_InfantryRegiment(United_States)

So no, it made no damn sense at all.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If I recall, the supreme court decision that upheld their internment (korematsu) was never overturned. So, the us could still do it, and quite easily as it was an executive order.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Even back in the 80s, $20,000 couldn't buy back their home and property. It was a pittance. Forced return of their property would be difficult too for the third hand owners (the owners that bought it from the ones who bought from the Japanese, whom were forced to sell at a discount rate). For the ones who directly bought from the Japanese-Americans, I'd return their property and compensate the 1940s person who bought it at the same price, pegged to inflation.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Fact: Italian-Americans and German-Americans were also interned and never compensated. This has been shamelessly covered up. Italian-American fishermen in San Francisco were forbidden to use their boats. One of them was the father of Joe DiMaggio.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The downvoter: what do you recommend? Did you present an alternative?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Good..

2 ( +2 / -0 )

An apology for what the U.S. government did over 75 years ago? Great!

Of course, it's better than nothing.

Here in Okinawa, they never admit, let alone apologize for, the fact that the land on which Futenma Air Station sits is the illegally confiscated private land which U.S. occupation forces encroached upon with impunity while area residents were herded in camps, instead demanding that a replacement be built at another site if we wanted it to be returned

No big deal here?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Ah yes, which is why the 442nd RCT (Go For Broke), comprised entirely of Nisei, became the most decorated unit in history,

@David Varnes Don't you think that had a direct relation to their families being in concentration camps? Few are as intelligent and brave as Muhammad Ali who refused to fight for the very people who were oppressing him. In fact, most cave, fight even harder to prove themselves, and then seek ways to turn their own cowardice around. If the U.S. government took my mother or even a cousin away and locked them in dirty horse stable just for their heritage, I would tell the recruiters what they could do with a rusty pipe if they asked me to go fight for the people that locked them up. Heck, I am still in awe that the Navaho lent their services since the abuse they suffered was far older and well known. Well, humans are dumb in general I guess and politicians sure know how to trick them like a farmer knows how to get a cow to go to the slaughterhouse.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Fact: Italian-Americans and German-Americans were also interned and never compensated. This has been shamelessly covered up. Italian-American fishermen in San Francisco were forbidden to use their boats. One of them was the father of Joe DiMaggio.

You should campaign for that to happen.

Or, are you criticizing this decision because an apology was not also made to the Italian and German Americans? That meaning that unless everything that should ever be apologized for is all apologized for at the same time, no apologies should be made?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Its not uncommon for those connected to “enemy” nations to be monitored.

I know that many Iraqi and other Arab nationals in the UK were interviewed and watched during the Gulf war. In WW2 Germans in the UK and British citizens in Germany were imprisoned. Of course the vast majority had no part to play in any espionage but its wartime.. niceties go out the window.

The Japanese themselves believe that all people of Japanese decent are Japanese.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Not all Japanese consider all people of Japanese descent to be Japanese. Like the Japanese Brazilians who moved to Japan but many couldn’t take it here and returned home again. Or Japanese born nationals who spend many years working overseas.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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