politics

China's modern Silk Road hits political, financial hurdles

9 Comments
By JOE McDONALD, MUNIR AHMED and SYLIVESTER DOMASA

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What happened to the idea of a joint development fund between members of the Quad. I know Japan is a big player in thiss area, but there was a desire to join with U.S and potentially Australia and India to present an alternative to BRI. Perhaps in conjunction with India's Act East policy .

I think there is a genuine and massive opportunity in this area.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Governments from Washington to Moscow to New Delhi are uneasy Beijing is trying to use its "Belt and Road" to develop a China-centered political structure that will erode their influence.

That is what should fear, cause China is almost number one.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

One belt and one road is mainly a domestic project. It will link and network the vast land through China. This is is the backbone of an even a bigger network that will link South Asia with North Asia, East Asia with West Asia. Japan must get into it, voluntarily if necessary. Japan can use the war compensation fund to get involved.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Japan and China are tied together by fate. Anything benefits China will benefit Japan. Japan must accelerate integration with China, not only economically.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Like I said in previous article, other countries don't trust China because China will attempt to screw over their partners every chance they get.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

One belt and one road is mainly a domestic project. It will link and network the vast land through China. This is is the backbone of an even a bigger network that will link South Asia with North Asia, East Asia with West Asia.

When you really think about it, this network also has strategic military applications; it provides the logistical and infrastructure support that enables China to extend its military operations globally . And those countries welcoming China's financial and infrastructure support under the program will obligate them to trade with China exclusively as well as support China political agenda, thereby effectively be under China's thumb.

"There is the perception of a Chinese incursion into their sovereignty.....

How is China's One Belt and Road program not imperialistic? I'm glad to see some countries have seen through the ruse and are backing away.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Halwick, if strong means imperialistic, then Japan should not develop at all. Let the world give up everything and go back to the woods.

By the way, one belt and one road is free to join. Nation has the right to reject it, such as India. Indian are great people and very tolerant to poverty.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Halwick, if strong means imperialistic, then Japan should not develop at all.....

@Akie, Let's substitute "China" for "Japan" in your statement and see if it still applies. But in your view, this doesn't apply to China as China is not an imperialistic country, right?

But let's call a Spade a Spade. If Imperialism means a policy of extending a country's power and influence through financial, economic, political and military means, this is exactly what China is doing through its One Belt, One Road (OBOR) program. I'll admit China is smart: after enticing a country to join the program with financial and infrastructure improvement promises, the country becomes obligated to China and thereby under its thumb.

And why did China built three major military bases on that island with naval, air, radar and missile-defense facilities in the South China Seas, and continues to send warships to the Senkaku Island region?

Oh, but this isn't being imperialistic, right?

By the way, the reason Japan is interest in being a part of the OBOR Program is purely opportunist, i.e., "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em." PM Abe is hedging his bet and jockeying to be in China's good graces, even if it means straining U.S. relations.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Halwick, Please study the definition of imperialism first. China doesn't occupy any land, kill any people, force any govts, to do things that others unwilling to do. China claimed South China Sea in 1945, publicly, according to law. If China likes, she could build 300 Islands in South China Sea, there is nothing wrong. What happens in South China Sea is the same as what happens Senkaku, other countries invaded and occupied Chinese territory. Quite honestly, only China would tolerate such kind of things and tried best to resolve the conflicts by peaceful ways. But please don't miscalculate China. China will not tolerate territorial invasions. That is why Abe should resolve the dispute as quickly as possible. My advise is that don't try China, don't invade China unless you want to become part of it.

As I said, OBOR is association of willing. Japan is not forced, nor pressured, nor ordered to participate. China is generously open to Japan's participation, given Abe resisted it for 5 years. OBOR is basically westward looking, Japan is left outside. It would disastrous to Japan if Abe doesn't change his anti China policy. I am really glad to see that Abe is steadily shifting his policy toward pro-China. Japanese people and Chinese people have so much common traits to work together. We don't have to pretend to share values, we don't have to dye hair colors, we don't even have to beg for being the closest.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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