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China calls Japan defense comments irresponsible

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“I hope Japan can learn from the past, seriously reflect on its own defense policy and do more to deepen mutual trust with neighboring countries, maintain regional peace and stability, not the contrary,” Ma said.

Indeed they should. And the first step in doing that, is increasing their own defenses and readiness. The best way to maintain peace, is for China to see that Japan is not someone to mess with.

10 ( +12 / -3 )

China’s defense and military modernization drive does not target any other country and is solely for safeguarding its own sovereignty, security and territorial integrity, Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said in the statement.

Unfortunately for its neighbours, China's definition of 'sovereignty' is rather elastic at the moment and currently includes those islands where it feels there may be sufficient natural resources to feed its monstrous appetite. I agree with Molenir above. China's bullying needs to be checked.

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The key reason for China to continue its military modernization efforts is its sense of urgency regarding access to markets and natural resources that feed its economic growth. This need is becoming an important factor in shaping China’s strategic behavior. China is extremely reliant on imports from abroad, particularly metals and fossil fuels. To secure these resources, China feels the need to defend the sea lanes vital for its imports. For example, 80 percent of China’s crude oil imports go through the Strait of Malacca near Singapore. Moreover, China has been in a variety of territorial disputes on its borders and may want to augment its military spending and modernization efforts to bolster its claims.

Japan faces a similar debate on how best to respond to China’s growing military. Two thought come to mind in Japan are those seeking cooperative engagement with a soft hedge and those supporting competitive engagement with a hard hedge. Supporters of the first ideas believe that China wants a peaceful international relations for its own growth but are still wary of its military modernization efforts and the lack of transparency in its military planning. Given the uncertainties regarding China’s intentions, they still want to keep the U.S.-Japan security alliance as the main focus of its regional security. On the other hand, those in support of a hard hedge against China remain worried that China will be less cooperative as its relative power increases. They point to China’s military modernization as evidence of its growing threat and want to ensure that Japanese and American forces in the region can still out-muscle the Chinese military, and they support advanced upgrades to the Japanese military.

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I think China is too slow off the Mark. It needs a bigger and more active army to protect it's interests and food and resource security for one billion people. Americas aggression(arming Philliphines, arming Taiwan, bases in S Korea and all over Japan) and Americas readiness to invade(Iraq, Afganistan), means that unless China takes are more stanch stance, it will collapse. Alternatively, the asian nations could sit down and negotiate a binding border agreement and save billions of dollars and maybe even lives.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

"...solely for safeguarding its own sovereignty, security and territorial integrity,..."

As defined by whom? China's territorial integrity seems to be something they are rather aggressive about, including claiming places that are not their's. Equally her sovereignty seems to extend to the capacity to bully those who do not agree with her practices. And it often extends to peoples who are essentially occupied by China at the point of a weapon.

As for China's "Security" does this extend to her perceived threats arising from nations like Japan and the Philippines taking issue with her overt expansionist goals? Or her lust for territories rich in fishing or natural resources?

I am very often reminded, by China's rhetoric and behavior, of another nation in 1936 who behaved in a similar manner. Pressing their interests while trying to mask vast military improvements as "security" and as harmless.

We would do well to guard against Chinese militarism and assure that China is not allowed to bully her Asian neighbors.

As for your concerns China. Duly noted. Now... as always... do shut up!

6 ( +8 / -2 )

What China needs to realize is that Japan is doing everything within its power to take the spotlight off its gross failure in regards to the ongoing nuclear disaster and related crises. Stirring up nationalist sentiment is a good on way to do that.

Molenir: "Indeed they should. And the first step in doing that, is increasing their own defenses and readiness. The best way to maintain peace, is for China to see that Japan is not someone to mess with."

Japan does need to shore up its defenses, I believe, since China is building up and modernizing it's military. Moaning and writing official reports, however, suggesting China is targeting Japan and what not only fans the flames and does not in any way help 'realize peace and stability'. The report is indeed 'irresponsible' (and believe me, I know China is also quite 'irresponsible').

-12 ( +0 / -12 )

China reminds me of the "Third Reich." Hitler's belief was that anything that had ever been part of Charlemagne's kingdom (the First Reich, or the Holy Roman Empire) was legitimately part of Germany. Charlemagne, known as Karl the Great in Germany, at one point conquered a vast territory that included much of western and central Europe. China's behavior is a LOT like Hitler looking back to Charlemagne for Germany's "legitimate" borders--or as if Greece decided that all of the land that was once under the control of Alexander the Great (from Greece to India) was "Greek territory." Ridiculous and frightening.

I believe that this is the underlying core of China's beliefs (look at its attitude toward Tibet, which it insanely calls part of China, Manchuria--which is not Han Chinese, the Senkaku Islands [in which it had no interest until oil was discovered], the many islands in Southeeast Asia it claims as its own, or the "New Territories" to the west, which they will lose just as surely as the Soviet Union lost all of the "-stans" [Kazhastan, etc]). China is bent on expansion, and must be treated as a threat.

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Asagao. What planet do you live on mate? Who exactly does China need to protect against? Are there legions of aggressive Americans waiting to invade China? Nonsense. More likely there are legions of American business people eager to invest in China. So where is the threat?

Japan poses no threat. Japan is not expanding her military exponentially and is eager to do business with China as soon as you lot can put a nearly 70 year old war behind you.

The Philippines, arming? Really? In what dimensional reality? This reeks of Chinese propaganda and bears no grounding in reality. In any case Chinese aggression towards Philippine national territories is something that we should all be concerned over.

Now S.Korea. Just because China foolishly supports N.Korea and her insane regime as a buffer state, does not mean that western support of S.Korea is unwarranted. N.Korea behaves like a brain fevered child often enough with nuclear tests, missile launches, threats of war and so forth. No rational nation sitting next to that nut case state would fail to arm against it. Even China.

As for Taiwan, who exactly has tens of thousands of weapons ready to impose their will upon an otherwise sovereign state of Taiwan? China's unwanted and unwarranted impositions upon Taiwan are clearly aggressive in nature and it is no wonder that Taiwan has turned to the west for protection against Chinese militarism.

As for Afghanistan and the war on terror. China cannot point fingers at America as your nation has leveraged the war on terror to expand your persecution of Muslim Uyghurs in NW China. Including labeling nationalist movements and equal rights movements in the region as "terrorism" when it is clearly a rational demand for equality.

Your post is pure Chinese propaganda and quite obviously so. Do try to mask your posts as real posts at least. Perhaps a course in debate tactics would be helpful.

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This is the usual, archaic Communist Party rhetoric from China.

The dialogue that China tries to initiate today, echoes of the small village denouncements made against land owners in the Cultural Revolution. It may impress their nationalists, but to the wider world, it all seems cliched and laughable.

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mikeyuri. Well written! I share your belief that there are strong similarities between 2011 China and Germany in the late 30's.

As a student of history it is hard to ignore these similarities. As many watched the rise of Germany and failed to see the threat, I feel many are doing the very same with China now. We must recognize the threat and take steps to stem it.

Step #1 is to tie all future investment and financial interaction to reductions in militarism and the protection of human rights. Sadly the corporate world, as in the 1930's, care only about money and will continue to feed this monster until it is far too dangerous to control.

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I wouldn't trust the Chinese military build up as being benign one bit. This country isn't trustworthy and hasn't shown much maturity in the events of the last few years (trawler incident, bullet train crash cover up, Nobel Prize winner lock-up, media censorship, rare earth metal import ban, etc. etc.)

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I live on this planet and spent time in China, Japan and neighbouring countries with the exception of N Korea. America is concerned about china militarily and has a Military budget for China. Arms aid for Philippines is on the table, google it if you don't read the news. The only right thing you mention is that Japan is no threat. Article 9 of the constitution guarantees that, although this is under threat from the far right with-in and Americas pressure on Japan to fight some of it's wars. Iraq WMD is off topic, but Taiwan(an internal matter) and North Korea(sanctioned and threatened because it won't bow down and become a democratic model like Israel or Iraq) and Vietnam/Philippines/Japan are all land disputes that are natural all over the world. I suspect that the real motives of Japan, regarding disputes with China and South Korea, is to take people's focus away from pressing issues at home and muster a sense of patriotism among the Japanese people.

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Regarding China, it's a case of "watch what I do, not what I say". And we can see what they're doing.

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Asagao; I suspect that the real motives of Japan, regarding disputes with China and South Korea, is to take people's focus away from pressing issues at home and muster a sense of patriotism among the Japanese people.

Isn't it the other way around where the communist party of China is trying to evade focus on internal problems within mainland China?

PRC presently contains massive energy shortage problem, a devastating ecological problem through massive pollution, a property bubble that faces eminent collapse, various national debts created by uncontrollable factions like the rail ministry, a military that is sending out mixed messages that showing it's splinted state, a massive imbalance in distribution of wealth, nation wide corruption running up to the highest level, an exodus of foreign companies due to the rising cost of labor and, a racial problem seeking autonomy through force if necessary.

PRC is a ticking time bomb and PRC has no answer to defuse it so they are trying to evade the problem by deflecting public eyes to external problems and to relieve pressure against the communist party.

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Japan will be a vassal state of China before long and needs to start cutting the best deal it can. The US is a dying country, the rest of the West is just as weak, and Japan refused to arm itself properly when it had the money and the chance...leaving no other options. China is the future whether we like it or not. But Japan will keep it's head in the sand, play tough until it gets some MSDF ships sunk trying to force a superpower out of its Lenensraum and realizes it has no one to rely on. By that time the Chinese terms will not be so good. The future for Japan is not a bright one.

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

For me it is not a question of whether the Japanese comment is irresponsible or not, but whether it is true or not.

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Since enough of China's shoddy trustworthyness and lackluster track record have been mentioned, all I have to say is that this is, once again, hyprocrisy and lying at its finest by an archaic political body.

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China’s defense and military modernization drive does not target any other country and is solely for safeguarding its own sovereignty, security and territorial integrity, Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said in the statement

And what right minded Asian nation would actually believe this statement???

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I think "Big Ma" is cryin' in his soup again,Maybe it's the LEAD in His Spoon! Better go out and buy a "Little Red Book"! (Naaaaah,,,,,,,,,!)

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i agree with tkoind & many others. china needs protection from What!? it supports NK & just isn't trusted by many Asian countries. many aspects of china i do like, BUT it should be a More active member in the world in world security, & not just selfish Business deals.

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Dear China: Please keep your boats in your own bathtub. Also, Japan and USA need to cancel all foreign aid to China in order to stop trying to buy love.

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I wonder when, like in ancient times, China will split up into 3 or 4 smaller riches? Maybe this is what the PRC wants top prevent.

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Asago. Point by point friend.

Philippines. None of your business. China's recent interest in islands that they wish to abscond with are a big part of why the region is likely to consider arming themselves. They fear China's interpretation of territorial sovereignty, and rightly so. If you don't want Asia arming to defend against China, then your nation should do more to prove it is not a threat. Something I think few would believe.

Taiwan and "internal matter" according to China only. The rest of the world recognizes that China does not have legitimate claim to democratic Taiwan. Taiwanese people do not want China to take over their nation. And the US had committed to assure that China is never able to do that. This is another example of why people should fear China. You impose your will on others at the point of weapons. What kind of good, benevolent neighbor does that?

The west will support and defend Taiwan against undue Chinese military intervention. So get used to it!

North Korea. "(sanctioned and threatened because it won't bow down and become a democratic model like Israel or Iraq)" spoken as only a Chinese cyber propagandist could speak. Really? Do you think anyone views NK as some kind of idealistic hold out against western repression? The world views NK for what it is, a cult state led by a crazy leader and backed by an opportunistic supporter, China. NK is a rogue state and few would be convinced otherwise. Especially those who have been to this bizzare nation.

As for Japan not being a threat. They are not a threat, but do not underestimate Japan's willingness or capacity to defend itself.

Nice try with the arguments, but this still reeks of Chinese cyber propaganda.

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I wouldn't trust the Chinese military build up as being benign one bit. This country isn't trustworthy and hasn't shown much maturity in the events of the last few years (trawler incident, bullet train crash cover up, Nobel Prize winner lock-up, media censorship, rare earth metal import ban, etc. etc.)

And the list goes on and on.... like arresting and throwing in jail common folk for expressing themselves in public?!

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skyguym42. You know in the 1930's many people said the same for the rising power in Germany. "they are the future", "we must placate the Germans" etc... This included much of the leadership of industry and western governments who saw economic opportunities as well as seeing the rise of that dangerous power as inevitable.

Later the world discovered, with the death of millions, why we should have cared more and taken greater action to stem the rise of a dangerous state.

China's thinking is too often very backwards and out of line with global thinking. Her policies on territory alone should greatly concern the rest of Asia.

We must resist Chinese aggression in Asia. We must stop funding China's military rise by tying our investments to changes in China's behavior. And we must stop tolerating China's repression of minorities, of other states and of her own people by tying economic support and investment to improvements in respect for human rights.

If we fail, we invite living out the late 1930's all over again and watching a dangerous state come to power where it begins to threaten the peace of the region and of the world.

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If the best Japanese diplomats can do is throw a hissy-fit at an airport in Korea because they were not allowed to see some islands that they reckoned were theirs, I don't hold out much hope for this issue being solved around a table.

I've changed my mind.

I see it all now.

The best thing is to evacuate ALL of Okinawa and turn the whole thing into a huge military base.

Come back US military.

We need you now!

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Japan presently has not capability to defend itself. In that sense, maybe Japan should keep quite. Japan would first need to change it's constitution to allow for a military build up. It's been something like 300 years since Japan had to bend to China. Guess history is about to repeat itself. Hmm, during those previous historical times, Korea was invaded multiple times. If anything the buildup in China is to prepare for a world of shortages, food and water. In that respect, Japan may not need to worry, since japan can't grow enough to feed itself and destroying it's water supply with nuclear power. The issue for Japan would be that they may not be able to import what they need and would be at the whim of the Chinese. I don't think they will play nice an share, since they still holding that 60 year grudge.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Tkoind2-so it seems that the common theme in your argument seems to be US aggression. North Korea could be a great state if the people weren't starved to death by American foreign policy. Taiwanese I met over there, told me they would love to reunify with China "when the time and conditions are right". The Philippines is drawn into Christian/Muslim wars, with the backing and support of...America. People live on a couple of dollars a day, but the military spends vast amounts. China has not invaded any countries, instead it does the opposite, it has a peaceful relationship and you can find heathy Chinese trade and development all across Africa. China is Japan 30 years ago, but it is catching up. Skygym42 could be very close to the mark. I am thinking of learning Chinese.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Asagao. Let me clear a couple things up for you before I address your post.

I am not pro-American policy in many cases. I am equally critical of the US wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. My politics dictate values that focus upon human rights, autonomy, individual freedom and freedom from repression. I apply that equally to China and to any other nation that represses human beings.

Now... nice attempt to put me on the side of "American aggression." but that is simply not the case. It is also a diversion from the real topic, which is whether China's policies and views are good for the region. So let's take on your points.

N.K. There have been numerous attempts to convince NK to give up militarism in favor of better relationships with regional partners. NK responded by upping the risk with nuclear development. While you are trying to portray and innocent NK, I remind you of the complete lack of respect for human rights and the absolute dictatorship present in that nation. I know first hand from Koreans who have family in the north who are not free to travel, to communicate, to engage in the world community or to have any freedom of thought or ideology.

Now if you really want to defend NK here, go ahead, but it certainly casts doubt over your support for human rights and your grasp of the fact that you are extremely isolated in your support for that country. In short, your posts on NK are clearly Chinese propaganda and have little grounding in reality.

Taiwan. Sure there are some who wish to combine their state with China. But there are people in Georgia who wish to reunite with Russia. I am sure you can even find a Uyghur or two who prefer Chinese rule. But the fact remains that Taiwan has repeatedly, as a majority, expressed desire for autonomy that China has reacted to with threats of violence. Hardly the act of a benevolent state who is concerned with the human wishes of the population. But nice try anyway.

I hardly think you can blame the US for the rise of Indonesian sponsored Islamic fundamentalism and separatism in the Philippines. Talk to most people from there and they will express a strong desire to avoid the rise of any militant movements in their country. Yet the Islamic groups continue to kidnap and kill people. It is only natural that the state, in defense of the people, would take steps to assure peace in the area and to route out violent groups.

China has not invaded anyone? Have you talked to the leaders of Tibet? They would argue differently as would history. The same applies to Han Chinese expansionism into NW China where you have repressed the Uyghurs and given rise to the violence there.

Healthy trade is not a problem my friend. We all want good, balanced, healthy trade. It is not China's trade that Asia worries about. It is China's inadequate understanding of human rights. Her failure to respect minorities, to grant freedom of belief, press, religion etc... It is China's quick use of military threats to get her way. It is China's foolish support of NK. It is China's rapidly growing military. And her capacity to try to bully other states into giving up territory. These thins are very wrong.

I sincerely doubt you have to study Chinese. Given the perfect alignment of your posts with Chinese policy, my guess is you speak, write and read it just fine.

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tkoind2, don't misunderstand, I don' think it's a good thing, but that it is inevitable. I do not believe there is really anything we can do about the Chinese. They have the military and economic power to do what they want in Asia, and the cultural confidence to motivate their population to want those muscles flexed. China is a vibrant (and scary) country in its ascendance.

What do we have to push back with?

A stagnant, shrinking, demoralized Japan that believes in its heart of hearts that the future is bleak and "nothing can be done"?

A demoralized, divided, financially shattered US (with a military worn down by endless wars) that cannot get its utterly broken political system to work without crisis forcing the issue.

The parallels are pretty scary between this and the 1930s. But in the 1930s the war actually spurred people to come together and fight. We no longer have either the fire in the belly or the leadership to do anything but watch. So Japan had better figure out how to survive as a client state.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

We must resist Chinese aggression in Asia. We must stop funding China's military rise by tying our investments to changes in China's behavior. And we must stop tolerating China's repression of minorities, of other states and of her own people by tying economic support and investment to improvements in respect for human rights. If we fail, we invite living out the late 1930's all over again and watching a dangerous state come to power where it begins to threaten the peace of the region and of the world.

yea...im pretty sure the "repressed" chinese people would want their country to get invaded again, suffer another century of humiliation, wealth stolen by greedy foreign powers, economy collapsing, carved into pieces, while you watch on the tv screen with satisfaction from your sofa as chinese people once again turned miserable and poor. i guess that must be your vision of "improving human rights" huh? or is that just an excuse so you can see chinese people suffer again?

you talk about the uighurs and tibetans? yea their lives must be so miserable because uighurs cant practice their religion freely, or tibetans not being allowed to have a picture of dalai lama on their wall, so i guess that it should justify your labelling of china as a threat to the world? ok, nevermind the western countries who got away with blatant murder as they bombed iraq and afghanastan to bits, and shot their women and children as though they were playing video games.

china, throughout her 5000yr history, has not invaded a single country outside of asia, unlike your beloved US of A, who without a doubt holds the title of being the most military aggressive nation in modern history since ww2.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The best way to maintain peace, is for China to see that Japan is not someone to mess with.

ha! ofcourse, if china gets angry, japan will surely run and hide behind their beloved americans for protection. yea, japan should not be messed with otherwise uncle sam will not be happy.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

China reminds me of the "Third Reich." Hitler's belief was that anything that had ever been part of Charlemagne's kingdom (the First Reich, or the Holy Roman Empire) was legitimately part of Germany.

wait....wasnt it due to this belief that forced japan to continue to claim kurils and dokdo? how ironic...

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

China is a big-ass country with a big-ass economy and a big-ass military.

Those who do not want to be friends with them are obviously stupid.........

Besides, what's not to like? Their food is tasty & popular all over the world!

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mikeyuri: "... the Senkaku Islands [in which it had no interest until oil was discovered]..."

Similar situation with Japan and it's claim on Dokdo, something it never put up much of a fuss about until the announcement that there may be massive amounts of (fuel) resources. So are they like the 3rd Reich as well?

You make some good points, but I believe there is no relevance to a comparison with Hitler and Germany in the thirties aside that Hitler and German attacked other nations and made land grabs and there's the potential for such with China. There were a lot of other reasons Germany acted as it did, including with the Holocaust, that are simply incomparable. Not only that, but Hitler charmed and had the support of his nation; the Chinese government, while there is a lot of national pride amongst the people, does not.

One of the points in this article is that China stated Japan's report was irresponsible because of its attempt to induce a certain amount of panic as a reason for defense, which in turn creates instability in the region and a lot more sabre-rattling. While China does the same thing if not worse with its military provocation and drills, they are correct in their statements.

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Please do not post inflammatory remarks.

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Japan must understand that China is aspiring to be a power which can challenge USA whether liked by Japan, south koreans,vietnamese or even Indians.

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Make friends with the Chinese and Indians and you'll be set for life!

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I just want my children and grandchildren to live in a world devoid of sabre rattling despots no matter what ethnic background from which they have emerged.Vast populations exist on the brink of starvation as a consequence of conflict. History should be a tool from which nations should learn that victory and defeat both come at an unacceptable cost to civilisation.

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The U.S.A. borrows money from China to build up its military so that it can "defend freedom."

China sits there quietly exporting its manufactured goods and rare metals all over the world, buying up real estate wherever it's cheap, increasing its already huge influence in Africa and watching the interest pile up on its loans to the U.S.A.

Think we'd better start learning Chinese.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

I guess I have the opposite opinion. You can look at China in terms of one-on-one relationships with Vietnam, Japan, Taiwan, the Philippines, etc. In that sense China looks more powerful. But I don't think China really wants to be fighting battles with literally every bordering country. The sum of all of the countries plus US backing makes me believe China will actually (yet slowly) go in to the other direction and start trying to build more constructive ties with other countries. It's a better option for them in the end, plus everyone else. A lot of little thorns in your side can eventually turn into one massive pain in the ass.

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Yawns! The Chinese navy is old Soviet junk or base on Soviet junk. Their Air Force is the same, so the only thing China can do is mouth off. My parents always said "barking dogs do not bite", so we should not make too much of this event. China would do better trying to be friends.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Similar situation with Japan and it's claim on Dokdo, something it never put up much of a fuss about until the announcement that there may be massive amounts of (fuel) resources. So are they like the 3rd Reich as well?

Fail. I often wonder where you get your distorted view from?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syngman_Rhee_Line

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Asagao makes me laugh while at the same time feel extreme pity for him/her. To live such a deluded life where all your problems are the fault of another country halfway around the world... it's really sad to see there are actually people who eat up all that offal that China's leaders shovel out and treat it as the only possible truth.

China's "need" for a strong navy has nothing to do with protecting their sea lanes. Their sea lanes are not threatened.

The "arming of the Philippines" is just the current rhetoric that replaced the old "occupation of the Philippines" when the U.S. had bases there. U.S. arms don't go anywhere that they haven't been asked and paid for. China is just miffed that the Philippines didn't buy THEIR arms which they freely sell to any regime that is willing to buy them. Had they done so, what are the odds that Asagao would be ranting about the "arming of the Philippines" by China? My guess: 0% chance.

Mainland China's insistence that Taiwan is still part of their country is laughable. The people in Taiwan are there because they continue to embrace capitalism and democracy - two concepts that only get lip-service in small, tightly controlled zones of mainland China. The Taiwanese rejected communist China and formed their own government. THEY DON'T WANT YOU OR WANT TO BE LIKE YOU. So why do you want them? The only reason I can think of is that the fact that there are people who had the "golden opportunity" to become glorious revolutionary comrades in the great revolution AND REJECTED THAT OPPORTUNITY sticks in the craw of mainland China's leadership as a huge embarassment. And in communist China, embarassments must be erased from the face of the Earth.

America's "willingness" to invade Afghanistan only happened after repeated requests for the Taliban (which ruled Afghanistan at the time) to hand over Osama bin Laden were rejected. America's invasion of Iraq... well even I scratch my head over that one. I don't think even China's paranoia would allow it to believe the Iraq debacle was some kind of trend in American politics.

Meanwhile China keeps arming their insane step-child to the south. All attempts by the rest of the world to get China to spank that petulant child called North Korea have been met with... silence. We don't really care that China wants to keep NK as a buffer nation. We DO care that China has allowed and apparently even ENCOURAGED their buffer nation to play with deadly toys. It's bad enough that responsible nations have to deal with nukes, but China has ON ITS OWN allowed a decidedly unstable regime to gain access to nukes. China has not shown the responsibility necessary to be a true "superpower" and therefore any military actions (including this naval build-up) on their part have to be viewed with suspicion.

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Seems like the Philippines need to be worried most. I mean, the Chinese have drawn lines right up to its shores.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The fact that the Chinese government would even comment on a Japanese defense buildup, especially when the Japanese buildup is compared with the Chinese buildup (which is much larger), will lead some to think that the Chinese buildup is, in fact, an offensive capability meant to back up their claims on territory with force.

Then you start looking at the Chinese cyber attacks and you start to wonder if their intentions are peaceful or if their "China first" policy will eventually lead to confrontation.

If this is the case once the Chinese have enough confidence that they could win a local war then they might just try it. Better that the neighbors keep their defenses up to date.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The focus on the naval buildup is a departure from China's past focus on ground forces. The Chinese military leaders want an ocean-going navy and undersea retaliatory capability to protect the sea lanes. China believes the U.S. military will disrupt China's energy imports in any conflict over Taiwan, and sees the U.S. as an unpredictable country that wants to encircle China. China's access to oil and gas resources as vital to their economic growth and fear that stalled economic growth could cause instability. Within less than a decade, China's demand for oil will surpass U.S. and will increase sharply in the next 20 years.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

One thing China should learn and understand is about territorial sea boundaries. The disputed islands is within 200 nautical miles from the Philippines. China is not even closer. Some of you here called China a bully. You're damn right. Btw, China cannot escape the Law of Karma.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Japan has every right to be concerned about China's military especially its naval buildup. Remember how China flew off the handle with the fisherman incident? Look at how China is acting towards Vietnam in regards to its naval exercises.

With China's new aircraft carrier fleet coming out along with other weapons such as its stealth fighter and anti-aircraft carrier missiles it will be able to further project its power and influence. Chinese diplomats may say one thing but I have some serious reservations about its military. There is a fine line with being a responsible power and being a bully.

Lastly I also believe China also has a right to keep its defenses strong. My family suffered grievously when the Japanese Imperial Army invaded China. Their village was burned to the ground. Luckily my grandmother had crackers to stuff into her children's mouths to stop them from crying for fear of giving away their hidden location from the Japanese troops. Yes this is the past but it is not forgotten.

In the present I wish nothing but the best for both the people of China and Japan hopefully their government's act responsibly towards each other.

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"Within less than a decade, China's demand for oil will surpass U.S. and will increase sharply in the next 20 years"

oh right back to 'that' argument, and what lifestyle standards are you basing that on mate?? isnt that the lesson of the moment-how capable are we, anywhere, of changing our lifestyles? Im not saying go back to caveman times, just adjusting.

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illsayit Aug. 06, 2011 - 07:43. oh right back to 'that' argument, and what lifestyle standards are you basing that on mate?? isnt that the lesson of the moment-how capable are we, anywhere, of changing our lifestyles? Im not saying go back to caveman times, just adjusting.

Let me know what lifestyle changes you are referring to? More than ever, every developed countries are very dependent on oil and natural resources. There are alternative energy to oil that is being developed, but so far, nothing surpasses the efficiency of oil. Until then, U.S., China and developed countries will continue to exploit and try to control the countries that are abundant in oil and raw materials. Lifestyle changes are great but realistically, there will be more and more intense competition from China.

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Seriously? Bolstering shore defenses is preparation for an invasion. Why would China possibly want to invade Japan when travel visas are so easy to get for Chinese nationals - not to mention the radiation tainted food, sea water, etc. This sounds more like a ploy by the SDF to increase their budget, during budget cutting times, and more beneficially, provide jobs for companies and staff in the shore defense bolstering business - which is cool.

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Remember when they say Iraq is a threat where they possess weapons of mass destruction?

It is not really about the threat but rather the consequences, what kind of idiot in CCP would consider war as an option for their growth? I know it may sound uncomfortable but some people here made decision based on propaganda rather than questioning the accusation itself.

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As long as there is, big foreign military bases in Japan; the country will look hostile in the region.

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As long as logical people can recall actions taken by PRC in tha last 50 years such as invasion/hostilities/threats against other nations such as Philippines, Vietnam, Tibet and Taiwan and internal violence/atrocities such as Cultural Revolution, Great Leap Forward, Tienenmen, PRC will look hostile in the region

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what kind of idiot in CCP would consider war as an option for their growth?

It's been used as a tactic for economic growth in other countries. Why wouldn't China use it?

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"“I hope Japan can learn from the past, seriously reflect on its own defense policy and do more to deepen mutual trust with neighboring countries, maintain regional peace and stability, not the contrary,” Ma said.

In the eyes of all of Asia and the entire world, it's China that needs to learn from Japan's past..

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It's been used as a tactic for economic growth in other countries. Why wouldn't China use it?

I'm not sure what you actually meant but with the current abilities China would collapse to oblivion if they start an invasion on Taiwan or smiliar countries. Comparing the current situation in US which has much higher military spending I doubt they could last long with Taiwan. This isn't some Civilization or Age of Empires, it's easy to seize power but hard to maintain it. If China is really tyranny as what some think it is, I think Hong Kong would be totally different today.

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The Chinese government's published 2011 military budget is about US$91.5 billion, the second largest in the world and up about 12.7 % from 2010 (US$77.95 billion).This figure would mean that for 2011, China's military expenditure as a percentage of GDP would be 1.4%In 2010, the US Department of Defense's annual report to Congress on China's military strength estimated the actual 2009 Chinese military spending at US$150 billion.

This is from wiki. It is a very big concern. Japan needs to tell them to shut up!

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