Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, eighth from left, speaks to his Japanese counterpart Taro Kono, eighth from right, during the Japan-China High-Level Economic Dialogue in Tokyo Monday. Photo: AP pool
politics

China, Japan seek to mend ties as Trump trade war looms

12 Comments

China and Japan took another step toward mending their troubled relations Monday, resuming high-level economic talks for the first time in nearly eight years.

Foreign Minister Wang Yi led the Chinese delegation, becoming the first foreign minister to visit Japan for bilateral talks since 2009.

Asia's two largest economies have been trying to improve strained ties and now have further reason to cooperate in the face of President Donald Trump's moves to impose tariffs on imports from their countries and his demands that they open their markets more to American exports.

Wang, meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, noted the threats of rising unilateralism and trade protectionism.

Abe heads to the United States on Tuesday to meet with Trump to discuss both trade and Trump's plans for a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Japan's leader said that he is seeking China's cooperation in efforts to get North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons development in a full and irreversible way.

Earlier Monday, Japan and China held what was billed as the fourth Japan-China High-Level Economic Dialogue, the first such meeting since August 2010.

Wang met with his Japanese counterpart, Taro Kono, for nearly four hours on Sunday, Japan's Foreign Ministry said. The two ministers agreed on the importance of arranging respective visits by Abe to China and Chinese President Xi Jinping to Japan.

© Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

©2018 GPlusMedia Inc.


12 Comments
Login to comment

How naive are Japanese People?

China sends military ships almost every day to senkaku islands and the Japanese people still extend red carpet to these guys, Lol.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

It is not a Trump trade war, Trump is simply correcting the unfair status quo because the US is being taken advantage of and has been for years.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Remember two great sayings that perfectly summarize foreign relations: Nations have no friends, only interests. And, there are no perpetual enemies, only perpetual interests.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I'm not against the modern "Silk Road" China is trying to execute by land and by sea, but it has to be for world economy improvement to all nations concerned in this project. If China has troubles with neighbor countries it's because there's military presence and getting threats only deploying with their own ways to expand/exploit unclear/ or other border territories . Why China doesn't elaborate with precision to other countries work together? There are many economic profits from there when China decides to display the right direction how to other countries really collaborate and share this project. Let's see if it will be much clear to Japan accept their big picture. I wish they would talk with transparency this project than continue the endless territory conflicts never to find resolutions.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Japan is playing a dangerous game if it thinks dangling the threat of rapprochement with China will somehow buy it more time to avoid transitioning away from the economic model that has served it so well, taking advantage of American openness while offering crumbs to those, not just America, that seek a level playing field here.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

While trade is one area that may be improved, relations with China will always come back to the Senkaku's, the shrine visits and enough sincere apologies over WWII for even China to say, ok thats enough now.

Since none of those sticking points is likely to be resolved, relations with China can only ever go so far.

China expects Japan to do all the work. Give up the Senkaku Islands, Stop visiting the Shrine housing A grade war criminals and teach the truth in your schools about Japanese atrocities while apologising repeatedly for those wartime actions. China does not compromise to reach agreements. Do as China wants or have bad relations with China. Dont speak out about issues with China as that is seen as "anti China" talk.

But if trade works at least that is something positive.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Japan is playing a dangerous game...

Sometimes, you have to take a risk. When Trump trade policy put Japan in a same category with China and Russia, Japan cannot sit still.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Money talks.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I agree, Japanese politicians must be suckers for punishment.

In a heartbeat we all know how these things go. One day seemingly amicable economic talks. Next day Chinese citizens in China destroying Japanese cars and properties in an orgy of violence.

Granted Japanese politicians bring it upon themselves sometimes with stupid statements denying the past, but the Chinese government themselves need to do a better job of not brainwashing their citizens into blind anti-Japanese hatred from a very young age.

Anyways, the Chinese government: show me the money!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

You'll never lose if you bet on both sides :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

People need to keep in mind that trade is trade and whatever military posture and alliances a country has need not reflect those countries you trade with. Countless examples of that, the whole half a trillion in trade between the U.S and China is ample example of that. Same applies to Australia, China is our biggest trading partner, double that of the next biggest, Japan, and yet we have a de-facto alliance with Japan and not China. Same applied to Europe in times past. Lots of trade, still two World Wars.

Trade is absolutely no guarantee whatsoever that conflict will not break out.

But if Japan is smart they will use the taxes generated by the activity to nurture their alliances and build their defense force to dissuade a good trade partner from becoming a potentially hostile force. And they should protect their core industries, in Japans case that is auto's and electronics.

In saying that, it would still be beneficial for the free world if the U.S and the E.U moved their supply chains away from China, but unfortunately it requires a level of intervention in the economy not seen since the last World War and fortunately we are not yet, hopefully never, at war. Without that intervention, its going to take a long time although I still believe it will happen simply because India is obviously the go-to option and would make a much, much more natural fit with Western partners and help them to take their eventual role as potentially, leader of the free world. There was a story on the Indian Times just yesterday about India seeking to double their contributions to the Commonwealth and you can see that the times is not far off when they take over the leadership role of Britain in that organization. A community of 53 countries lead by India is nothing to sniff at.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The broader perspective makes sense as with Matt H., above.

Trade as with military alliances is not a narrow road from the world perspective.

The are many players and infinite options. Each country must take and make its own path.

Not every country must depend on a specific relationship and stance.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites