politics

China upset after Japanese minister visits Taiwan

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Chinese government should just get over it. Taiwan will never yield to become part of China unless a war has started and China won. It is the same as if you ask people form HK where they are from. They will never say they are from China. They will say they are from HK. Even though HK is part of China now, but those who grew up under British will never consider themselves as part of China.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Another effort that reinforces the principals of Government. Intimidation, bullying, extortion, and bribery - concepts a good government can not do without.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

China always seems to have a long list of demands from Japan in order to maintain good relations with China, while in return they have to do nothing for Japan, and never care about our concerns or complains. Invading Japanese airspace and Waters hundreds of times a year. While at the same time supporting an aggressive North Korea testing nuclear weapons and launching ballistic missiles towards Japan. They always seem to want to talk about World War II. We can definitely have that conversation, but are you ready to talk about your mistakes as well? Tibet, Tiananmen square massacre, suppressing the Uyghurs minority? You want to focus on Japan's mistakes from 75 years ago while ignoring all of yours including present ones.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Poking at China must be fun, and keeping promises is extremely hard for Japan. When China hits back then J people would cry foul. Every time it was Japan that always started it. That is why all these key words keep popping up to describe Japan: breaking promises, provocative, two-faced, and further down the wrong path.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

@flowers - nice try with the Chinese propaganda. Pot...kettle...black. Propagandists in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Tough.

Abandon the cruel tyrannical Communist Party of China, hold free multiparty elections, and apologize for the sins of the former CPC controlled regime.

That'll win my respect.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

hatsoff, thank you for thinking that my post was Chinese propaganda. I am an outsider looking in as you said your glass houses. I read Chinese and Japanese news everyday and I found that Japan’s always been the one provoking China and China has to react to all sorts of provocation from Japan. It’s like Japan is trying to discredit or suppress China. As this article has shown, knowing full well that there was a promise made with China regarding Taiwan, Japan had to intentionally break that promise. Does Japan have to lie and cheat in the international arena in order to get noticed? And, people here tend to come up with excuses for Japan. Japan did break its promise in this case and this was not the first time I tell you.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

@flowers - so to be the objective outsider you purport to be, perhaps you'd care to list China's transgressions too. Nah, thought not. Nice try but it's pretty easy to see through you.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

hatsoff, the problem is I couldn’t think of any China’s transgressions, only those responses to Japan’s action. Can you list them for me? But make sure that it was not something that Japan did to China first. Now think about this case, do you deny that Japan broke its promise first? Don’t try to avoid the questions or come up with any excuses.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

@flowers

Utter rubbish.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

"China said on Monday it has complained to Japan after a Japanese minister visited self-ruled Taiwan over the weekend, warning this could hurt relations between Beijing and Tokyo."

There they go again. Constantly "warning" other countries. China is afraid of Taiwan because it is proof that Chinese people can be successful in a democratic society. Just like Hong Kong. And they are afraid of the United States, because they haven't even tried to take Taiwan by force since the PRC took power.

flowersMar. 28, 2017 - 05:50AM JST hatsoff, the problem is I couldn’t think of any China’s transgressions, only those responses to Japan’s action. Can you list >them for me? But make sure that it was not something that Japan did to China first.

China signed the Sino-Japanese Treaty of Friendship in 1972 and even reaffirmed it in 1978. Japan has done NOTHING to China since 1945. China's complete disregard for the Treaty they signed, the attempt to steal the Senkakus, the CCP orchested anti-Japan policy, military aircraft and ship incursions along Japanese territory and airspace are all Chinese transgressions carried out unilaterally against a non provocative neighbor. Of course all that is just part of China's anti-US stance and their agenda to replace US strategic dominance in the region. Only problem is no other countries in the region feel like being under the dominance of a totalitarian dictatorship.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Zzzzzzzzzz

0 ( +0 / -0 )

it was not something that Japan did to China first.

Mao Zedong thanked Japan for fighting against KMT. He said it was because of Japan that the Communists could win over much stronger KMT.

Neither Mao nor Chiang Kaishek said anything about Nanking.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

OssanAmerica, “China signed the Sino-Japanese Treaty of Friendship in 1972 and even reaffirmed it in 1978. Japan has done NOTHING to China since 1945.” I think this is what they called, “fixated mentality.” You are living in a box and could never see beyond that. As a leader of China had said at one point, “We can forgive but we can never forget.” This sentence says it all. After the Pivot to Asia was announced Japan stepped up its effort to curtail China believing that it had the support from the US. You can tell who was the first to see Trump and to beg for forgiveness for his previous support of Hillary. Trump quashed TPP so that’s the end of the pivot. Japan IS a provocative neighbour, you can notice this from the trail of crumbs that Abe left behind, there were articles about Abe following Xi where ever he went and tried to curry favour other countries to go against China. He went to the PH and Vietnam to rouse up support and he even offered ships and aids so that they would stand up to China. As you can see the president of PH, Duterte, put a stop to all that even after the PH got an upper hand on the Arbitration case. You can see the trend of what Abe was trying to do against China. After he couldn’t gain total support from the PH and Vietnam, now he turned to India and tried to stir things up. So, who is in the bad here, I have never heard Xi said any bad things about Japan but Abe went around bad-mouthing China. Feel like a bite in your mouth when you say, “under the dominance of a totalitarian dictatorship.” Even Trump now refuses to talk about human rights and freedom. I just don’t see anything wrong with totalitarian dictatorship as long as the government put people’s well-being first, that is what China is doing. Who cares about politics and ideology when people try to earn a living and make ends meet.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

I have never heard Xi said any bad things about Japan but Abe went around bad-mouthing China.

You are being very selective. Not so long ago, China was in Germany begging Merkel to side with China against Japan and was promptly told to stick it. Germany is just one example, but Russia is another. And you talking about Duterte turning away from Japan but let's not forget he was really having a go at Obama in that whole saga, not Japan. And China putting it's citizens well-being first... That's la la land.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

flowersMar. 29, 2017 - 01:05AM JST OssanAmerica, “China signed the Sino-Japanese Treaty of Friendship in 1972 and even reaffirmed it in 1978. Japan has done NOTHING to China since 1945.” I think this is what they called, “fixated mentality.” You are living in a box and could never see beyond that.

Your comments are so removed from reality that they can be called "deranged". Can you give one example of a totalitarian dictatorship that puts it's "citizens first"? Because it sure isn't the CCP.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Haaa Nemui, “You are being very selective.” I wonder what the word “bad-mouthing” means to you. Did Xi bad-mouth Japan in Germany? Think again, he was trying to do a damage control that Abe had created. And, who said anything about “Duterte turning away from Japan,” who would refuse free gifts? Have you heard about China lifting over 700 million of people out of poverty? Who are the highest spending among the tourists? Look at China’s modern infrastructure and the rail systems then tell me are they not living in la la land?

OssanAmerica, you’ve probably never visited China. How would you manage over 1.3 billion people? Now people are living better and they travelled around the globe, is this what you call a totalitarian dictatorship?

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

flowersMar. 29, 2017 - 03:52AM JST OssanAmerica, you’ve probably never visited China. How would you manage over 1.3 billion people? Now people are living better and they travelled around the globe, is this what you call a totalitarian dictatorship?

If they can not vote and have no say in who rules them, yes that is a totalitarian dictatorship. Even Mao originally promised that the people would be eventually allowed to vote. The CCP lied from the get go. The population is meaningless. Your term "manage" really means control and to keep it at any cost. The wealthy class are living better, those left behind are not. The CCP ensured that no middle class would grow, as that is what leads to demand for democracy.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Flowers - bad-mouthing is simply trying to put someone out something in a bad light through words. Exactly what Xi did in his visit to Germany. What does it mean to you? Saying nice things? Damage control for what? There was no situation to need damage control for. It was purely China trying to become more favorable in the eyes of Germany and Merkel didn't want anything to do with it.

Lifting people out of poverty and putting citizens first are not the same. Both China and Japan have a lot of work to politically. Both are provocative countries in Asia. Hence the common comments about puts and kettles.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

OssanAmerica, “If they can not vote and have no say in who rules them, yes that is a totalitarian dictatorship.” And, you think that is bad for the Chinese people. Which country contributed to the highest growth rate in the world for decades. Do the people suffer under CCP? People are well off and middle class in China is growing by leaps and bounds. China is minting billionaires everyday. I have no complaint about that, it is better to live in a society that you don’t have to be afraid being gun down on the street or in a society that hates foreigners.

Haaa Nemui, “Lifting people out of poverty and putting citizens first are not the same.” Why are they not the same when the government thinks and helps its people first. The focus is on the people not corporations. Let the people be well off and uplift their standard of living. It took only three decades for China to climb up from poverty sicken nation to become 2nd largest economy in the world. It’s unprecedented and that’s good for the whole country and for the Chinese people.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

The wealthy class are living better, those left behind are not. The CCP ensured that no middle class would grow, as that is what leads to demand for democracy.

Actually, you're incorrect. China has a middle class, and it's been growing for the past couple of decades.

One thing I enjoy about traveling to China, is that the people are upbeat and positive. After decades of poverty during the Mao years, things began to change when Deng Xiaoping became leader. You can see this in the people there, they are proud of where their country has come to. They talk of 'the Chinese dream', a play on 'the American dream', whereby a person born in poverty actually has the possibility to become rich beyond imagination. They feel positive about the future, and it shows with a positive vibe in the air.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

flowersMar. 29, 2017 - 08:09AM JST OssanAmerica, “If they can not vote and have no say in who rules them, yes that is a totalitarian dictatorship.” And, you >think that is bad for the Chinese people. Which country contributed to the highest growth rate in the world for decades. >Do the people suffer under CCP? People are well off and middle class in China is growing by leaps and bounds. China >is minting billionaires everyday.

Do you think that minting billionaires every day represents a growing middle class? Or is it making the gap between the wealthy ad poor even greater? China does have a middle class, but it's nowhere near the amount that the west expected from them when the decision was made to support China's growth an economic development back in the early 90s. It was two birds with one stone, China providing the cheap labor and exports that helped the growth of the US retail industry. And economic development would raise the standard of living in China and create a large middle class who invariably would push the CCP to loosen it's authoritarianism. Well China obviously grew economically, but the CCP has tightened it's authoritarian control to ensure that their power does not weaken. Those who meet young Chinese from the cities see the prosperity and business possibilities and believe that the CCP is doing a great job for their citizens. They don't meet the people who lost their homes to government demolition and building plans, or their health and lives destroyed by pollution from government owned or backed factories and plants. The near drunk nationalism. military and territorial expansion is part of keeping the people under control and diverting the issues. I've had friends whose parents fled China when the CCP took power losing all their property. There's good reason that the people of Hong Kong and Taiwan don't want to be under CCP control. And Taiwan , a successful independent democratic governance is a "core" issue for China because they are terrified of the example it sets for all Chinese people.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

OssanAmerica, “Do you think that minting billionaires every day represents a growing middle class? Or is it making the gap between the wealthy ad poor even greater?” From what you wrote you seem to be living in the past. I just read a report that said the gap between rich and poor is now worse in the US than China. You are still thinking that Chinese people would help change the government. Tightening control you are talking about is within the government itself and it hardly has any impact on average citizen. You can see the chaos of the two parties system. Who got elected in the US? Of course, those who are rich and famous. Do you think Trump is qualified to be the president of the US? He is looking over his own self-interest: getting patents approved, hiring those billionaire friends, helping his daughter in business, getting his daughter working for him, and on and on. So, what happened to the democratic system that you are so proud of? Self-interest is the current product of the US democratic system and it is now on the reverse gear. China’s politics are not great but at least it is helping the majority of the people and not the selected few with self-interest like in the US. What you heard about those who lost their homes due to progress is only a few and they only complained because they wanted more money. I have friends whose properties were taken over by the developers and they got brand new places to live. They’ve got so rich that they spend most of their time traveling. They came to visit me last October and they did not feel any shame of buying brand name products. Pollution is a major problem in China, but the government is seriously doing something about it and they seem to have it under control. In the US, I hear they are thinking about getting back into coals power plants. Do you see the flaw in your logics thinking that things must be bad under authoritarian government? The fear of people revolt is enough to keep CCP in line and always think about the people first. Now let me mention a little about India which has a democratic system for many decades, remember China used to be even poorer than India not very long ago, how does India turn out to be? They are still trying to install flush toilets. China and India both have about the same size of population, both have access to the West, and both are in Asia. Do you blame the government of India or the people? Think about it, without CCP China would be like India and still couldn’t afford to buy a cell phone. You talk about Hong Kong and Taiwan thinking that they “don't want to be under CCP control.” People hate change so it will take time, when China’s GDP is on par or exceed the US at that time people will think differently. I remember the time when Hong Kong was taken over, rich people there were leaving en mass because of fear especially created by the Western media, but after awhile they went back. Their daily lives have not changed much, only got richer. It would be the same for Taiwan, more jobs and money will be flowing in from the main land. Only time will tell, and China can wait.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

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