politics

Emperor's abdication ceremony likely to be held in Dec 2018

24 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO


  • Sort by
  • Oldest
  • Latest
  • Popular

24 Comments
Login to comment

I think this whole process is artic cold and lacks any touch and warm of human compassion.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

I bet with that date, the Imperial agency is hoping he passes away before he can abdicate.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Of Japan’s 125 emperors, including the sitting 83-year-old, 58 have so far abdicated. But Japanese legislation currently only allows posthumous abdication.

Please tell me how someone is posthumously able to abdicate? Oh and by the way.....this is 100% false, as I have repeatedly written, the absence of a law, in the Emperor's case, does not mean that something is not allowable.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

History in the making, wish I had a front row seat

3 ( +4 / -1 )

1 year and 8 months away.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Only "posthumous abdication" is currently allowed? So theoretically, they could also deny abdication after he dies if the law was written that way?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Much too slow! The Emperor should be allowed to enjoy his retirement asap. Given the less than robust state of his health his physical condition could suddenly take a turn for the worse. Consideration should also be given to his psychological condition : he might himself feel that he does not have much time left. After all, he is only human and should be treated as such. Like many pensioners after a long life of loyal service it seems like he is being treated in a shabby fashion by a heartless bureaucracy.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

He should just walk out.

10 ( +14 / -4 )

Mike L, I agree but unless he and his wife squirreled away enough funds to sustain their lifestyle or are allowed to retire in some other country (Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia...) where they can stretch out their income, he can't simply walk out.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Yes, historic. I always like the photos of Him and the Empress. Classy.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

the absence of a law, in the Emperor's case, does not mean that something is not allowable...

Not in the case of this "Imperial Household Law." Those original law makers, led by the Japan's first PM Hirobumi Ito, left an official document "皇室典範義解 (1889)" or "Explanation of Imperial Household Law", which denies, in unmistakable terms, abdication by living Emperors. The goal was to avoid divided royalties that often caused nasty power struggles in Japan.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The date is out of spite. He wanted to leave two days from yesterday. He could leave tomorrow with no effect on the transition. There's no reason to do this to him unless they just want to punish him.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

u_s__reamerAPR. 13, 2017 - 08:09AM JST

Much too slow! The Emperor should be allowed to enjoy his retirement asap.

Read his words. http://www.kunaicho.go.jp/page/okotoba/detail/12#41

English translation http://www.kunaicho.go.jp/page/okotoba/detailEn/12

A major milestone year marking the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II has passed, and in two years we will be welcoming the 30th year of Heisei.

"30th year of Heisei" or the 30th year of his reign is 2018. It is obvious he wants to retire after celebrating his 30th year.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Why do they continue to call him the Emporer? Their Empire is over. Would be a good opportunity to change that as well.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

They will be televising the abdication ceremony I hope, sounds very interesting

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Gotta hold it off as long as they can! Same as with talk of Aiko inheriting the Chrysanthemum Throne; they avoided it as long as possible and prayed to the Shinto gods that a boy would be born in the 11th hour. One was. I think some people are honestly praying the man dies before he can abdicate so that, in their opinion, they can for whatever reason save face. It took Abe NO time at all to "reintepret" the Consitution. It took him NO time to ram through the Secrets Bill, and now the most recent bill that everyone is opposed to, but their living god making his own decisions... nope... that takes some serious thinking time and postponement.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

First i would make it a national Holiday and have all Arrears in Japan . Then have a ceremonial tradition of old dress up for the reverence to The Emperor that in past was all powerful for all Japan . His position should be carried on whoever is to pe the head, whether a male or his Daughter if the Constitution allows . Even though im a Foreigner I think any country that has a history like Japan should carry the Emperor's position on for ever

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Can not televise any of it really, maybe the ending and start. Those sacred objects of power should only be seen by certain people lest the myth is exposed. He is a nice old man who is tired, let him go. I hope his son manages to build on his Fathers Legacy.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

it a too long of wait, he deserve happiness and enjoyment, done enough.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why do they continue to call him the Emporer? Their Empire is over. Would be a good opportunity to change that as well?

Originally, the ruler of Japan was known as either (Yamato-ōkimi, Grand King of Yamato), or (Ame-no-shita shiroshimesu ōkimi or Sumera no mikoto, Grand King who rules all under ). So, what is the difference between an emperor and a king?

A king is the ruler of a state.

An emperor is the ruler of an empire. An empire may consist of multiple states and so an emperor may rule over many kings.

In the example of Japan, the country was divided through much of its history into many separate and warring states that were controlled by individual ruling clans. The Japanese emperor was said to be the ruler over all those states. For most of Japan's history, however, starting with the very first emperor Jimmu in 660 BCE, the emperors role was largely ceremonial and didn't involve much actual power. It wasn't until the Meiji Restoration in 1868 that the Japanese emperor actually consolidated his power and became the ruling head over all of Japan. This situation endured until the Japanese surrender in 1945 at the end of World War 2 when the emperor's position of power was reverted back to a purely ceremonial one.

Or to put simply: tradition!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Why must foreigners be so critical, why just not be happy that the Emperor is allowed to do so and wish him and the Empress, good luck.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

In Japan, the constitution guaranteed freedom for everybody except Emperor.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

In Japan, the constitution guaranteed freedom for everybody except Emperor.

The one time Abe's government wants to follow the rules, and it's to punish the Emperor.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Why wait ? WHY ?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration