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Exporting next-generation fighter jet would serve national interest: Kishida

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Other countries will "line up" to get those fighter, just like when they really "line up" to get Japanese private jet.

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2023/02/0aa9f96d1f08-urgent-mitsubishi-heavy-set-to-terminate-passenger-jet-project.html

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2023/02/07/business/corporate-business/mitsubishi-heavy-spacejet-end/

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

So according to Kishida, Japan's national interest is synonymous with the military industrial complex's interests.

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For multinational projects like GCAP, export territories are dived up among partner nations.

UK is likely to get Middle East and Australia, Italy gets Europe, and Japan gets Asia.

Within Asia, there is just single potential market, Singapore. Taiwan would also like to buy, but Japan cannot sell to Taiwan due to the fear of Chinese retaliations.

This leaves Japan wanting to demand Australia as its marketing territory, but I doubt UK would concede Australia to Japan.

In other word, export rights are surprisingly not important to Japan as they have literally no markets to sell GCAP to and Japan shouldn't be obsessed by it.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

So according to Kishida, Japan's national interest is synonymous with the military industrial complex's interests.

Larger production volumes reduces the unit cost, which is beneficial for the Japanese taxpayer.

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When the tri-partite project to develop next-generation fighter jets came up on the table, probably with support by the U.S. government, which wants to make Japan a future partner in jointly developing lethal weapons, such as Aegis Ashore, for example, Tokyo must have assured both Britain and Italy that there would be no impasse on that.

In other words, the Japanese government had already broken the pacifist constitution. That is always a fait accompli. Explanation to the Diet and the nation comes after it.

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Its actuality is just for arms industries' immediate interest, will ruin national interest futuristically. 

Originally, it's nothing but constitutional violation.

"criminals" at government are destroying democracy or citizen or society.

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Samit BasuToday  08:19 am JST

For multinational projects like GCAP, export territories are dived up among partner nations.

UK is likely to get Middle East and Australia, Italy gets Europe, and Japan gets Asia.

Within Asia, there is just single potential market, Singapore. Taiwan would also like to buy, but Japan cannot sell to Taiwan due to the fear of Chinese retaliations.

This leaves Japan wanting to demand Australia as its marketing territory, but I doubt UK would concede Australia to Japan.

You're forgetting India which may become one of the biggest operators excluding Japan and UK.

India till recently had procured most of their fighter planes from Russia but with recent relevation of the actual performance campared to spec sheet performace they would be most likely look for an alternative source.

India also does not want to lean too closely with the US so the natural option would be European/Japanese models.

India has considered Japanese planes in the past and with GB partnering in this project, India will be more than eager to look in as their next generation fighter planes.

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UK is likely to get Middle East and Australia, Italy gets Europe, and Japan gets Asia.

This leaves Japan wanting to demand Australia as its marketing territory, but I doubt UK would concede Australia to Japan.

Umm no. Australia will not be buying these fighters. Not even 1. Perhaps you meant to say they would offer a cheap cut price version to New Zealand, and argue over who supplies NZ?

The last time Australia purchased anything other than US made fighters were the French Mirage III/O, Mirage III/D built in Australia under license beginning in 1963, with a total of 116 units.

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@Triring

You're forgetting India which may become one of the biggest operators excluding Japan and UK.

India won't buy GCAP. India has a policy of developing own fighter jets under Modi's "Make In India" policy and is currently developing three jets simultaneously, Tejas Mk2, TEDBF(Naval jet), and AMCA.

@Peter14

Perhaps you meant to say they would offer a cheap cut price version to New Zealand

New Zealand doesn't have an combat air fleet and navy of its own, is under Australia's protection.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_New_Zealand_Air_Force#Current_inventory

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@Samit Basu

India doesn't have the capability to develop it on their own. They have no aerospace industry nor capable material manufacturing industry to provide the necessary knowhow to design ormanufacture a 6th generation much like SK.

They will need to procure the engine and all other parts from abroad as well as the various manufacturing processes.

What they will likely do is sign a procurement contact with a clause stipulating that they can obtain some licensing permits to manufacture some components as a start.

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New Zealand doesn't have an combat air fleet and navy of its own, is under Australia's protection.

New Zealand has been considering reintroducing fighter aircraft to its air force for years and a good deal could well tempt them to do so.

New Zealand has a small navy of its own, including surface combatant ships.

Australia will do its best to protect all of its allies, including New Zealand, should the need arise. That is what allies do.

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@Triring

https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/India/india-clears-project-to-develop-amca-5th-generation-stealth-fighter-aircraft/ar-BB1juUwU

India Clears Project To Develop AMCA 5th Generation Stealth Fighter Aircraft

In a major development, the Cabinet Committee on Security has cleared the project to design and develop the Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft fifth generation stealth fighter jet project to be undertaken by the DRDO.

India's not buying GCAP, mark my words.

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When the tri-partite project to develop next-generation fighter jets came up on the table, probably with support by the U.S. government, which wants to make Japan a future partner in jointly developing lethal weapons, such as Aegis Ashore, for example,

Your information is old. Aegis Ashore is already old news. The US was considering it for Guam and Hawaii but decided to make the whole system mobile. The Navy has reduced the software in the Aegis combat system down to something that fits in a standard ruggedized military laptop. They have a DDG out in the Pacific right now with all the systems including the radars operating off a single laptop. Instead of a big fixed shore installation the Missile Defense Agency has put the SPY-6 radars along with the SM-3 and SM-6 missiles on trailers that can be moved around behind a standard semi-tractor so they can be moved around and hidden. The trailer mounted SPY-6 becomes TYP-6. The US Army has Tomahawks and SM-6s on trailers in the Indo-Pacific theater now. TYP-6 is in testing.

Theoretically any ship with a radar can now use Aegis on a laptop to integrate weapons added to the ship, and there are already shipping containers converted into launchers for SM-3 and SM-6, and Tomahawk. Combat power can be dispersed and hidden.

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India produces SU-30MKIs under license for the IAF, and the MKI version is considered to be the most sophisticated Flanker variant produced anywhere as it has all aspect thrust vectoring and advanced avionics. India also produces the single engine Tejas, which is a purely Indian design and built only in India.

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More than half of the world's difficulties can be traced to the export of arms from manufacturing countries to impoverished countries. Let the impoverished countries build their own weapons. Do not encourage the dissemination of weapons any further.

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Tax dodgers are severely punished by law in any country, and yet it is the law lawmakers themselves in Japan who initiate to violate the law by making loopholes in it. Hence, the brouhaha about the slush fund scandal currently storming the Japanese political scene. 

PM Kishida says exporting next-generation fighter jets serves national interest. But these fighter jets are lethal weapons, no doubt, whereby Japan is supposed to be unable to export such weapons to third countries for profits under the pacifist constitution. And so, Kishida is instigating the nation to take the initiative in violating the constitution. 

Britain and Italy would not have participated in this joint project unless they had been assured by the Kishida government that there would be no constitutional restraint and the Japanese people’s opposition to the selling of the finished products. 

Is taking the initiative to violate law and principles a prerogative of the government or powers that be?

I wonder if this trilateral joint project hadn’t been subject to parliamentary debates in Britain and Italy.

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