politics

Kishida's apparent nepotism may shake cabinet further

46 Comments
By Tomoyuki Tachikawa

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

46 Comments
Login to comment

some ruling party members have been disappointed that Kishida has avoided giving a reasonable explanation

There is no reasonable explanation.

it is "discriminatory to criticize him just because he is the eldest son."

Poppycock.

20 ( +24 / -4 )

Most of the guys in the government inherited the position, they all come from important/rich families with connections and a history. They have been doing this since the Shogun times, no big surprise here.

13 ( +32 / -19 )

Bringing family member into certain position Japan that's not new.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2009/04/27/national/hereditary-politicians-a-fact-of-life/

13 ( +27 / -14 )

Poppycock

I was thinking it was more balderdash or even hogwash.

18 ( +21 / -3 )

I’m glad to see that the opposition and the public are taking note of this nepotism. Finally, eyes are opening!

11 ( +16 / -5 )

Around 30 per cent of the politicians in the Diet are second-generation politicians, rising to 40 per cent for those in the LDP.

10 ( +17 / -7 )

Critics said hereditary politics has been prevalent in Japan and shows few signs of abating, as many young people have been less interested in becoming lawmakers due largely to a series of scandals surrounding politicians.

Nepotism and the influence of the Unification Church have existed for decades with the one party rule of the LDP and not restricted to Kishida.

Looks like it took the assassination of the former PM to appear to bring more scrutiny to this.

If other generations of Japanese do not present alternatives, the apathy will continue though.

6 ( +15 / -9 )

Historically nepotism has never worked out positively, Japanese politicians are an example of the negative consequences of such practices.

1 ( +16 / -15 )

Nepotism greases the wheels of political power, like marriages make dynasties. Kishida's capitalism isn't that new after all, innit? If we want a change in the way things are run, we'll have to wait for the electorate to wake up, but since it's easier to dupe people than convince them that they've been duped, it will take an earthquake before they'll open their eyes and smell the coffee and vote to throw the LDP out with their dirty-money bathwater.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Not sure why the LDP are concerned about the falling support numbers. The mere fact that Kishida chose to place his son in this position now shows that he is completely tone deaf to what he's created since Abe's death or that he doesn't care. He will reshuffle the cabinet again and get a temp spike in numbers and wait for the people to vote LDP in the next election. It's the same TV sitcom every season.

10 ( +17 / -7 )

Kishida is hopelessly out of touch with the people he is supposed to represent, anybody would have known that appointing his son at this moment would be seen in a terribly negative light, even on the best circumstances it would have a cost for him. By doing it anyway it is clear he is unaware how the common people think. It also shows that he has surrounded himself with "yes men" so nobody told him of the obvious consequences of the appointment.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

From Keio to Mitsui to this new post? Having met and known people from these circles, most likely Kishida’s son has no skills and only his father’s name to help him. My guess is that Mitsui was tired of him and told Kishida it was time for him to leave. Otherwise the son of the PM would be unemployed—we can’t have that, can we?

And people wonder why truly talented and hardworking young people are encouraged to leave Japan? This is surely one of the top three reasons.

2 ( +11 / -9 )

If the Japanese political press corp had a sense of humor, they would be asking Koizumi"s son and all the other princlings what they think of this.

9 ( +14 / -5 )

Kishida is absolutely clueless.

Totally corrupt and lacking any sense of good judgement!

4 ( +12 / -8 )

Maybe with his approval ratings plummeting, Kishida thinks his days as PM is numbered, and so he wanted his son to “study”politics while he’s still in power.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

There’s a bunch of words here …. Innuendo and what if’s…. But this is a non story …. It’s not about some religious cult …. Not about nepotism…. Kishida’s son appears to be very qualified for the job !if the so called opposition party has issues …. It’s their problem…. They own it ! Elections have consequences…. If their only message is whining and not what they’re going to do for the working class …. They’re gonna be stuck in their minority positions forever ! Kishida’s issues are all economic and his continued push for more and unsustainable corporate welfare!

-13 ( +2 / -15 )

The revolving door is being oiled up even as we write…

3 ( +12 / -9 )

Steven Macarthy, agree that the opposition can pretty do nothing but scream and rant all the time, but with Kishidas public opinion polls taking sudden and dramatic dive ( he was flying high a few months ago ) you have to wonder why he didn’t expect the reactions and backlash? Perhaps he was too arrogant to care??

The “He loves his son so much “ comment from the LDP lawmaker was just lame. The old boys club and nepotism is an image the government should be doing everything in their power to dismantle, not double down on. Just shows me Kishidas judgement is questionable and that we maybe wandering aimlessly back into the revolving door prime minister game again. Not a confidence builder at all.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

ALL Japanese politicians have sons/relatives as their political secretaries, so that alone isn't that big a deal. It's also not necessarily inappropriate - the son is 30, graduated from a good school, presumably "studied" politics for a year to get real experience. Probably a better appointment than many. BUT, it is tone deaf right now to do this.

What would be nice would be if this opened peoples' eyes to the fact that EVERYBODY does this and this is why politics has become a hereditary business here, not to the country's benefit. Abe didn't have a child himself but he was reportedly training the son of one of his other brothers to do the job. If this provoked the kind of general outrage the reports of the Unification Church have, maybe there will be some real change. But I bet a lot of the LDP lawmakers will handle this carefully on the "if you live in glass houses" principle.

-2 ( +8 / -10 )

A close aide to Kishida also said the appointment was "appropriate" in consideration of his son's "character and ability," adding that it is "discriminatory to criticize him just because he is the eldest son.

I may be cynical, or may only be right to say it's extremely difficult to find the right person by merit within the LDP ....

3 ( +5 / -2 )

To be honest i don' really mind. As long he is capable at doing his job as a secretary. And there is nothing wrong with a father wanting to trust his son to be at his side to teach him the ropes. Is human nature.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Steven MccarthyToday  08:43 am JST

There’s a bunch of words here …. Innuendo and what if’s…. But this is a non story …. It’s not about some religious cult …. Not about nepotism…. Kishida’s son appears to be very qualified for the job

There are plenty of people who are just as qualified if not more so. He got the job the same way all the sons of LDP politicians do. One or two years in the private sector as a formality to give the impression they actually have some life experience, then a sideways move into daddy's office, then a seamless handover of the Diet seat, the hoarded campaign funds and support network when daddy retires or shuffles off the mortal coil.

5 ( +13 / -8 )

elToday  09:04 am JST

ALL Japanese politicians have sons/relatives as their political secretaries, so that alone isn't that big a deal.

It should be. They're exploiting the power and influence of their positions to guarantee cushy jobs for their offspring, thus filling the political sphere with clueless, overpaid "professional" politicians who have no answers to Japan's problems while shutting out people of genuine talent who could really get something done.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Feudal system, in 2022

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

Nepotism in Japan? That's new.

-4 ( +9 / -13 )

I give thee this chalice of poison, where all have failed miserably before thee, you never know might get lucky son. Nice hair, that’s a positive.

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

HiroToday  09:31 am JST

To be honest i don' really mind. As long he is capable at doing his job as a secretary.

I suspect just about anyone would be.

And there is nothing wrong with a father wanting to trust his son to be at his side to teach him the ropes. Is human nature.

In a small family business it's all very well. Not in public office.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Another lawmaker of Komeito, the LDP's coalition partner, said the prime minister "has not heard the voices of the public."

None of them do! They are only there to serve themselves and their group as clearly demonstrated by Kishida appointing his son which can only been seen as nepotism regardless of wether he is capable or not. They don’t care. I think he sees his time is ending and has given his kid a leg up before he too gets the LDP golden handshake.

I have said it before nepotism in Japanese politics is exactly why nothing ever changes and why the money keeps flowing in the same direction. It’s complete pantomime to give the surfs a whif of democracy which in itself is pure ether. Big business and supposedly democratic governments the world over are in bed together to enrich themselves. They removed that kind of power from Royalty under the banner of freeing the people only to end up doing exactly the same thing. Until democracies place harsh penalties on politicians for not doing what they promised or doing what Kishida has just done nothings going to change! They make the laws so why would they make laws to punish themselves. Any group who comes in to claim they will change everything will simple be sucked into the corrupt vortex and the status quo will return. Anyone incorruptible are disposed of post haste.

There should be a law that does not allow close relatives to enter into politics if there is someone from the family already in politics with at least a 50 year ban after they have retired. That problem solved!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

It’s not just the political world that has nepotism.

It’s also in the entertainment industry, where untalented children or grandchildren are on shows because of who their parents etc are

9 ( +10 / -1 )

What a pompous piece of trash……

Hey son, come work for Me, I do nothing fly and travel everywhere on the taxpayers yen and get paid a ton as well!

you can too!

3 ( +10 / -7 )

The arrogance, I didn't think Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida would be so tin eared not to openly independently advertise the post on merit, and support the selection process accordingly

A Japanese official at the Prime Minister's Office said Kishida decided to pick his son as a secretary to him, knowing that the decision would be met with a "certain amount of criticism" as his administration is becoming more unpopular.

This is so disrespectful to the tax payer, and the electorate.

Worse still, the system allows such misconduct.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

MeiyouwentiToday  08:41 am JST

Maybe with his approval ratings plummeting, Kishida thinks his days as PM is numbered, and so he wanted his son to “study”politics while he’s still in power.

Kishida Snr. will stay in the Diet no matter what, like all the other ex-PMs. This is more about lining up his son to take over the family busin-... ahem, be the LDP candidate in his Hiroshima constituency, as per standard LDP procedure. Ensuring the dynastic succession is all that matters to the LDP, things like managing the economy well and serving the public are just a distraction.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

They're all mad coz it was not his sons, as they would have done just the same..

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

Even within the ruling camp, skepticism has arisen about the appointment by Kishida, who has touted his own "ability to listen" to various opinions in decision-making.

Historically, ALL Japanese politicians who have become prime minister, have the "ability to listen. However, that doesnt mean they are not going to do what they want anyway. Kishida included!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Family values are important. Love your kids. Help them.

-12 ( +0 / -12 )

Was anyone better qualified rejected in favour of the son?

Is the son suitably qualified for the position? Does anyone here actually know the son well enough to judge this?

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Giving a job to a family member borders on idiocy if you’re in politics. What was he thinking?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Surprise, surprise! The Japanese government Old Boy's club engaged in nepotism?

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

There’s a bunch of words here ….

Excellent summation of your statement Steven, which is as out of touch as Kishida’s appointment of his son.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

"Apparent nepotism"?

There is nothing apparent about it. This is the norn, it's how Japan works. The apathetic public makes it all so easy.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Bring back The Suga!

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

"Kishida's apparent nepotism may shake cabinet further." There is nothing "apparent" here. Japan's government is now blatantly a dynastic family business. Shake the cabinet further? Let us hope it will be like an earthquake that knocks this poor excuse for 19th century plantation down flat.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites