politics

Political dynasties die hard in Japan's general election

17 Comments
By Ami Takahashi

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17 Comments
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Feudalism never died in Japan.

16 ( +19 / -3 )

Meet the new boss....same as the old boss!

Similar to the USA, where generation after generation votes for the Democrats to lift them out of poverty.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

Most predictable headline ever.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

North Korea has a very similar political landscape.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Yep, but Japan spends about 50% of their energy on trying to portray a certain image whereas the North Koreans don't care about their image at all.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

The isolated, privileged elite passing the baton to more of the same isolated, privileged elite.

Have any of them ever used a PC, know what a USB memory stick is, been shopping for food, bought a used car, tried to get a child into daycare, or commuted on a crowded train?

They'll know nothing about the challenges of daily life.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Political skill is genetic.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Re: "Feudalism never died in Japan"

Indeed, it hasn't died in the US either.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

I was stunned when I heard the news that power would be handed down from father to son in DRPK, aka, North Korea. Then I looked around Japan, where I noticed bequeathing a politician father's field of votes to sons or daughters is widely practiced as if they were rice paddies.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The pot can't call the kettle black.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japan is pretty much a feudal elective monarchy, where the PM acts like an elected monarch. The is fierce and unwavering loyalty to the political families, and the voters care about a person's background the jobs of his/her parents and heritage more than anything else. The party that can gain the support of the most political families will win the elections.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Although Japan is not a unique case, it has a higher percentage of lawmakers who hail from a political dynasty in comparison with other democracies,"

That's because this pseudo feudal kingdom is a "democracy " in name only. Show me how many other real " democracies" have had one party in power for almost 70 years. It's a sad joke.

Meanwhile, an LDP supporter said, "I think it is brave for an LDP lawmaker to retire and make way for his son. 

Rocks in the head...how is it in any way brave when an LDP politician daddy retires and passes his vassal supporter base to his boy?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

blahblah222

Today 05:34 pm JST

The is fierce and unwavering loyalty to the political families ..

I don't think that's very common, personally. Most people seem indifferent to their local politicians if they even know who they are.

...and the voters care about a person's background the jobs of his/her parents and heritage more than anything else.

Some voters, maybe. Unfortunately they're often the ones who can actually be bothered to vote.

The party that can gain the support of the most political families will win the elections.

Not because of widespread respect and support for them. Hereditary politicians often come from overrepresented rural areas so the votes of aging conservative country folk who like to stick with the status quo are more important than they should be, and loopholes in the political funds control law allow Diet members to amass personal donations and bequeath the money to their offspring.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Christ, even China doesn't have this problem.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Danielsan

Won't get fooled again...

Oh, damn, we did.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

marcelitoToday  06:12 pm JST

"Meanwhile, an LDP supporter said, "I think it is brave for an LDP lawmaker to retire and make way for his son. "

Rocks in the head...how is it in any way brave when an LDP politician daddy retires and passes his vassal supporter base to his boy?

Isn't it fascinating to find out what LDP supporters think. Obviously I use the word "think" very loosely.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Meanwhile, an LDP supporter said, "I think it is brave for an LDP lawmaker to retire and make way for his son. I think I can trust the son rather than someone I don't really know."

What a bizarre and completely illogical comment. You can't trust someone you don't really know but you can trust the son of someone you don't really know.

Japanese voters baffle me. Saeko Hashimoto was on TV this morning delivering her legally mandated, pre-recorded political speel. Kept using the phrase "Nippon modoru" take back Japan. Take Japan back from whom? You're party has been in charge for over 7 decades years. How do people fall for this nonsense?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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