Supporters of Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen celebrate her reelection outside the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) headquarters in Taipei, Taiwan, on Saturday night. Photo: REUTERS/Tyrone Siu
politics

Taiwan's pro-Japan young people back Tsai's re-election

27 Comments
By Tomoyuki Tachikawa

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Good for Taiwan.

Stand against Chinese aggression and duplicity.

34 ( +36 / -2 )

A great result. The mayor of Kaohsiung is a complete traitor to the modern history of Taiwan with his support of Beijing.

30 ( +32 / -2 )

they were taught at school about the Japanese empire's colonization and aggression before the end of World War II in a neutral manner, unlike their Korean and Chinese counterparts.

There you go. Taiwan does not fuel anti-Japan sentiment or use it as a diplomatic tool. This, despite the fact that The Republic of China (now Taiwan) was the China that fought Imperial Japan's invasion in the 30s. Some of those IJA troops being Korean, starting with Chung Hee-Park. South Korea, learn something and hang your head in shame.

Taiwan is a democracy and deserves the support and protection of the entire free world. Any military action by China to "unify" Taiwan would be nothing more than an invasion.

26 ( +33 / -7 )

What else to do?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

they were taught at school about the Japanese empire's colonization and aggression before the end of World War II in a neutral manner, unlike their Korean and Chinese counterparts.

This fact is the key. Unlike the brainwashed Koreans and Communist Chinese, the Taiwanese youth have been taught about their history in a balanced way. They know that there were problems with the Japanese occupation (almost a century ago) but the Japanese have brought so much modernization and democratization to Taiwan that on balance it is positive.

It is no wonder the youth of The Republic of China (Taiwan) love Japan, and all things Japanese, and despise communism and mainland China.

The UN should recognize the Independent nation of the Republic of China (Taiwan). Communist China will never defeat the Republic of China.

25 ( +29 / -4 )

Lived in Taiwan for a decade starting in the early 80s, when KMT rule was being eroded. There were still army troops stationed at street corners, and supporters of the nascent DPP met in trepidation, not sure if they would be arrested. I couldn't converse with most elderly people, who spoke only Fujianese and Japanese and I only Mandarin. Much credit goes to Chiang Kai Shek's adopted son, Chiang Wei-kuo, who seceded his father and slowly ushered in democratic measures. A movie came out at the time, "City of Sadness," revolutionary as it portrayed in flattering terms the departure of a Japanese family at war's end and their friendship with the locals as well as the brutality of the KMT rule in Taiwan. It was not banned or edited, thanks to Chiang Wei-kuo, and that opened the floodgates.

18 ( +19 / -1 )

Sometimes, we have to try and discern when people are just being gracious. That is, keeping themselves in check not to fight/ rouse unnecessary squabbles.

young people, who are favorably disposed toward Japan, may have been one of the major contributors to the re-election of incumbent.

Really ? They just had to be favorably disposed toward Japan to make that call ? Say Not even Anti- Mainland China ? Whom I'd think is their* *here & now nemesis ?

16 ( +17 / -1 )

Tsai

"Unlike Koreans, Taiwanese have good memories of Japanese colonization, even though they didn't like being second-class citizens," she said.

I would be very skeptical of anyone who says people treated as "second class citizens" have good memories of such treatment.

It would be more accurate to state that, "while treated as second class citizens in their own country by the Japanese colonial forces, the memories of Chinese KMT rule were harsher and more unfair". This would make Japanese occupation the least harmful out of two bad situations.

Having said that, the younger generation who did not live under Japanese rule have no personal experiences that are negative of Japan, but may have some of KMT rule.

Well done on re-election of Tsai, this clearly shows that the majority in Taiwan does not wish to be a part of Communist ruled China at this time. The closer the ties it can make with other sovereign nations the better.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

According to Kyodo News reporter Tomoyuki Tachikawa

they were taught at school about the Japanese empire's colonization and aggression before the end of World War II in a neutral manner, unlike their Korean and Chinese counterparts.

It seems abundantly clear that being Japanese colours Tachikawa's perceptions, and his reporting.

-7 ( +14 / -21 )

This is a strange time to bring out a love for Japan. What’s behind this? I see this as damage control in light of a disastrous week Japan just had with Ghosn. To connect the reelection of an anti-China president to a love for Japan seems a bit far fetched. You may have both, anti-communist China and pro Japan voters but saying they love Japan while disliking their communist brothers is not rational. Was there any pro Japan propaganda during the campaign? We’d have heard screams from Beijing.

-8 ( +11 / -19 )

#

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

@Bruce Chatwin

It seems abundantly clear that being Japanese colours Tachikawa's perceptions, and his reporting.

Exactly, Tachikawa is seeing things that's not there.

-9 ( +7 / -16 )

What an amazing difference between Taiwanese and Koreans.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

What the ? So this reporter now wants Japan to take credit for the election victory in Taiwan. lol

-1 ( +9 / -10 )

Certainly more of a pro-Japan opinion piece than an actual news article about Tsai's re-election.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

Just wanted to point it out again (some here don't seem to grasp the message):

Moreover, they were taught at school about the Japanese empire's colonization and aggression before the end of World War II in a NEUTRAL manner, unlike their Korean and Chinese counterparts.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Incumbent Tsai's reelection as Taiwan' President is favorable for democratic countries in East Asia. President Tsai knows that Japan would be the key country for Taiwan's security. She asked Japan to do so as it was during 1895-1945. No one thinks Taiwan will be the part of Japan again, though. The Taiwanese(Don't call them Chinese. Taiwanese get angry) missed Japan's governance because Chiang Kai-shek and KMT's governance was too awful and cruel.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Nice one Taiwan. With the amount of 'friends' Taiwan is now losing due to Chinese pressure, it's good to see Taiwan not fueling anti-Japanese sentiment or using it as a diplomatic tool as Ossan said.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Nice. :)

5 ( +6 / -1 )

"Their corruptive, cruel and undisciplined governing frustrated Taiwanese people very much, and therefore, many of them missed the Japanese colonial period," Cheng said, citing accounts he heard from his grandfather and older relatives.

Simply well-known facts everyone who talked to old generations in Taiwan knows.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

As a frequent visitor to Taiwan during the 80s I noticed that most -if not all-middle aged and elderly people spoke Japanese fliuently and had a great interest in that country. Young people seemed to have a liking for Japanese pop music and magazines. Japanese food was also popular with numerous Japanese restaurants in the cities. Not once did I hear unfavourable criticism of Japan and the impression I gained was that the colonisation by Japan must have been benign if not advantageous to Taiwan.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Glad to know Taiwan has such positive views towards Japan.

It's even more important to make sure China and Taiwan never go to war. It would be a disaster for the region.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Interesting, both HK and now Taiwan have rejected China. What does that say about China?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Moreover, they were taught at school about the Japanese empire's colonization and aggression before the end of World War II in a NEUTRAL manner, unlike their Korean and Chinese counterparts.

Just curious, what aggression did the Japanese carry out in Taiwan before the end of WWII?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

It’s interesting that Taiwan is bit like Austria. Both are countries (Taiwan de facto) that separated out from a former larger empire, China and Germany. Both national identities were born after WWII, but Austrians historically view themselves as Germans while the Taiwanese do not see themselves as Chinese.

Austrians tried to reunite with Germany but were forbidden and told to remain an independent state

The Taiwanese are trying to be independent but are forbidden to do so.

National identity and its role in nation / states is the question. What is a nation? What is state? What is the difference? Are the people of Okinawa a nation but not a state? Are Austrians both? Taiwan?

Taiwanese will never be Japanese no matter how many railroads, schools, and hospitals were built. And they won’t consider themselves Chinese even if investments pouring into the island from China doubled. How society is treated by the ruling government is irrelevant. The election results are also unrelated to the five member band “Arashi” for heaven’s sake.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

China and Korea, having fought wars and naval skirmishes with Japan during the Middle Ages, will most definitely incorporate anti-Japanese sentiment into their educational system.

Other Asian nations that were colonized or annexed by Japan don’t have that issue, so are generally favorable toward Japan.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

It seems abundantly clear that being Japanese colours Tachikawa's perceptions, and his reporting.

This isn't the first time I've seen such comments in a Kyodo article. It's obviously editorial policy.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

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