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Group of over 100 lawmakers visit Yasukuni shrine

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> William77Apr. 22  06:55 pm JST

I wonder how would people back in my continent react if Scholz and his party or Draghi and his coalition would send prayers to nazists and fascists.

On the other hand in a few days in Italy they celebrate the day of freedom which is april 25th.

The liberation of Italy from fascim,and it’s a national celebration.

In 1985 Ronald Reagan and (then) West German officials went to Bitberg where Nazi officials are buried and laid a wreath there. Many people, particularly WW2 vets, Jewish people (vets and not) and others who could remember the nazi brutalities were offended and pissed off, rightfully so.

It may have been well intended but it was offensive, insulting and just plain DUMB to say the least. Just like this scenario. And Japan during the WW2 era had a brutal fascist regime too.

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A cross-party group of more than 100 Japanese lawmakers on Friday visited Yasukuni shrine, a Shinto shrine in Tokyo regarded as a symbol of Japan's past militarism by its Asian neighbors, for its spring festival.

I remember being mildly appalled to learn that Ichiro Ozawa was in the habit of making generous donations to other politicians'campaign funds out of his own warchest. I wonder if any of this lot have any similar arrangements.

Hidehisa Otsuji of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party and head of the group said at a press conference

Wait, how on earth did a press conference get arranged for this nonsense?

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CaliforniaDreamingToday  01:45 am JST

Losing a war doesn't mean that the losing country cannot pay respects to it's many dead.

Of course it can. Private citizens can go to Yasukuni Shrine any time they like. Japan can pay its respects to its war dead on memorial days at public venues. That is not the issue. These politicians don't go to Yasukuni to pay respects to anyone. They go for the sake of their own careers. It's just a cynical, selfish PR stunt.

CaliforniaDreamingToday  02:56 am JST

Alex, I downvoted because I don't believe Japan deserves continually having it's past rubbed in its face. Apologies and reparations have been made, but none of them have put an end to the continued anti Japanese racism. It is time for Japan to move on and realize no apology will ever be good enough for some people.

That's due in part to those politicians who visit Yasukuni not believing any apology was ever necessary. They're busy denying that there ever were any war criminals, and that accounts of war crimes are all malicious lies made up by wicked Chinese and Koreans. There's no moving on when Japan has politicians like that.

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I agree with you mick. Sorry to hear you are lonely in Japan. I know that feeling. It is miserable. I never did understand blaming the post WW2 generations for the sins of a few individuals a long time ago. Some people are very racist towards Japan, and this constant harping on about WW2 is an easy hit.

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Wont somebody please agree/disagree with me...I feel so all alone here...wife in Osaka visiting Mum.

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The criminals are a small part of the interred population

Not really, Nearly 6,000 class B criminals were identified at the tribunal and an undisclosed number of class C. These were the torturers, prison guards and executors, (beheading of defenseless POWs and bayonetting Chinese civilians for practice being a favorite method).

Japanese people, from regular citizens to leading government and industry leaders, pay them respect and bestow them honor to this day. Some people are offended by that.

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Slightly off trail, but comments like "Yasakuni visits are what make Japan's Asian neighbours distrust Japan " are certainly not borne out by the millions of Asian neighbour tourists who visited Japan year in year out before the pandemic.

The figures are available ....check them.

Chinese, Koreans and others are the majority visitors by a country mile.

BTW Australia currently commemorating/celebrating ANZAC Day and that has certainly been hijacked by conservative political parties like the Liberal Party.

I think Japan's post war behaviour has been pretty good compared with the military adventurism of some western countries.

"Embracing Defeat " probably the best history of post WW2 US etc occupation and the rewriting of the Constitution

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It is enough now. Their crimes were paid for, and it was a long time ago. The criminals are a small part of the interred population. I suggest if you hate Japan and want to keep reminding Japan of it's past, that is almost out of living memory, that you consider leaving. I sure hope you don't have Japanese family. My kid gets bullied in the US and part of that bullying is constant reminders of things the he personally did not do. Let people honor their ancestors, it really is no one else's business.

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Losing a war doesn't mean that the losing country cannot pay respects to it's many dead.

That is not the issue. Japan can and does honor its war dead routinely, nationwide, and its victims don't complain about that.

Yasukuni is different. It secretly enshrined its war criminals in the 1970s and its museum glorifies their deeds, which lead to the violent deaths of around 25 million people. So yeah, guess what, lots of people have an issue with that.

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Alex, I downvoted because I don't believe Japan deserves continually having it's past rubbed in its face. Apologies and reparations have been made, but none of them have put an end to the continued anti Japanese racism. It is time for Japan to move on and realize no apology will ever be good enough for some people. The war criminals are a small part of Yasukuni, there are far more people enshrined there that were simply soldiers caught up in war who paid the ultimate price and deserve respect from their country.

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This is very undiplomatic of Japan.

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Losing a war doesn't mean that the losing country cannot pay respects to it's many dead. The biggest war crime of all was the dropping if nukes on Japanese women, children and non combatants, yet America is allowed to be proud of this heinous act.

Sure, we all know that bad men are interred there. War makes monsters out of men. The bigger picture is the continued bullying of Japan because of something that happened a long time ago.

Japan's war dead deserve some kind of recognition. I won't allow people I love to be continually beaten with the stick of Japan's past.

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AlexToday  05:12 pm JST

For some reason, I have more downvotes than upvotes, which I find surprising given I only stated facts in my comment.

You'll find that most of the comments that don't chime with the nationalist, pro-LDP viewpoint typically get at least 10 downvotes.

Why the downvotes? 

I wouldn't expect an answer. There appears to be a lot of these people, yet they have very little to say for themselves.

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For some reason, I have more downvotes than upvotes, which I find surprising given I only stated facts in my comment. Why the downvotes? Because you don't want to admit that enshrining war criminals is a problem? Or because you don't mind the fact that the Yasukuni museum has completely white-washed the atrocities committed by Japan in neighboring countries? Facts are facts. History is a very real thing that happened, no matter what you try to hide. Maybe if these issues were dealt with, there wouldn't be such controversy around lawmakers visiting Yasukuni Shrine.

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Peter14Today  04:26 pm JST

How about they give public statement with every visit where they state they come to give respects to the honored dead. Those who dishonored themselves and their people remain dishonored in death and get no respect for their criminal actions.

Would that make a difference?

That's not the way the Yasukuni people think. As far as they're concerned the war criminals aren't guilty of anything under Japanese law and are victims of victor's justice, and that all the souls at Yasukuni are sort of merged into one entity with all their sins washed clean away. Personally, though, if I were the soul of a Japanese soldier who got killed in a Banzai attack I would have mixed feelings about being merged with the souls of all the blundering idiots responsible for getting me killed, but there you go.

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How about they give public statement with every visit where they state they come to give respects to the honored dead. Those who dishonored themselves and their people remain dishonored in death and get no respect for their criminal actions.

Would that make a difference?

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Convicted war criminals are among those being paid respect to. They deserve no respect and those who do pay respect to such vile war criminals are themselves thoroughly contemptable.

I doubt that assessment. It is assumptions that any thought for criminals is occurring and is nothing more than opinion. The shrine represents many conflicts over hundreds of years yet all people focus on is one conflict and what in comparison to the whole is a minuscule number of convicted criminals among millions of souls who committed "NO CRIMES".

So no respects to any of Japans honored dead because some very few are horrific criminals? Too harsh on the vast majority who deserve respect but must apparently forever go without.

People assume what is in the hearts and thoughts of those paying respects at the shrine is criminal and supports criminals. Has anyone ever said they go to pay respects to the criminals specifically?

Can they not pay respects to ancestors who died in the past hundreds of years without being labelled as doing something else?

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@ blue

That's amazing you've been coming to live in Japan for so many years and still don't realize the difference between a sword and a saber .

The Japanese Katana isn't a sword its a saber .

Originally from China.

Oh well ...atleast you know the difference between a shrine and a temple.

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Nayel

The issue isnt the honoring of the dead soldiers.

The issue is what the soldiers did and the imperial army's war crimes that many feel were not held accountable for and without sincere apologies

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How many of the so called imperial war heroes were executed or committed suicide ?

How can we possibly forget what happened to all the others in asia that perished during the showa era ?

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blueToday  11:19 am JST

I do not know what was the reason for Yasukuni to be built in the first place.

I understand it was founded as a place to commemorate those who had fallen in any war Japan was involved in, starting with the Boshin War of 1868-69 between Imperial forces and the Shogunate. In that respect it was not much different from such venues in other countries while Shinto was the official state religion and the Emperor was considered a god.

As such, I am not sure the statement and link my guide establishes between its creation and what they claim was "obvious" nationalism. Was it built for Japanese citizens and family members to celebrate / pay reference / remember / mourn the deads, was it as a place of reflection or a memorial, or was it a place of nationalism to start with? No clue.

I think the nationalist stuff started creeping in when various priests with close connections to the WW2 officer corps and State Shinto ran the place, and didn't think they had much to feel guilty about.

And to @Ossanamerica.

I have known Yasukuni JInja for 25 effing years, so don't.you.lecture.me!

Ossanamerica probably thinks you're a CCP online fifth columnist with an attitude like that.

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When Japanese politicians are desperated to get political funds, they must goto the Yasukuni shrine.

Otherwise they will lost the funds and they will lost their election campaign!

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Personal experience.

When I first came to Tokyo in 1997, Yasukuni Jinja was one of the shrines I visited (heck, I visited every and all shrine and temple I could back then!)

For some reason, the atmosphere was different. (I did read the explanations of the guidebook and considered Yasukuni more as a "memorial" or "cemetery" of sorts back then, hence put it down to that).

For the rest, it did look like any other shrine I already visited, silent and with worshippers going around doing their business, until...

2-3 black vans with imperial music at full volume came in and vomited a lot of dudes in full military regalia.

TBH, for a moment I DID freak out, especially when I saw the worshipper squatter like scared birds.

Then, I noticed that the rifles were obvious props, and so were the swords which look blatantly like those sold in cheap souvenir shops. I recalled what my (French) guidebook said. I actually still have that guidebook: "Tokyo - Kyoto", Guides Hachette Visa, pub. 1988 and think it may be interesting to share its content on this board.

Under "Parks and Gardens" (sic), pg. 113, Yasukuni Jinja. "Build in 1869, this sanctuary is dedicate to all of those who died for the country from the Meiji restoration to nowadays. It is therefore and before anything else the symbol of Japanese nationalism, and even nowadays, politicians aiming for a career do go there during the Matsuri (shrine festival) which takes place from July 13th to 16th. A small museum dedicated to the war has been opened after the 1945 defeat."

Back to my story, now reassured about what shenanigans were going on, I continued my stroll around the compound. I noted that wherever the cosplayers went the worshippers retreated, leaving pretty much only me, other foreign tourists (some pretty baffled as to what was going on) and the unruly bunch.

I expected the administration of the shrine to call the police or have their own security expel the bunch (silly me). It never happened. This taught me the first of the 2 things I got out of Yasukuni that day.

The second thing I learned when going to the museum and read their version of WWII.

I do not know what was the reason for Yasukuni to be built in the first place. As such, I am not sure the statement and link my guide establishes between its creation and what they claim was "obvious" nationalism. Was it built for Japanese citizens and family members to celebrate / pay reference / remember / mourn the deads, was it as a place of reflection or a memorial, or was it a place of nationalism to start with? No clue.

What is sure though, is that Yasukuni has become a freakshow of a circus where normal citizens seemed to be afraid to go. Cameras, reporters, protests, counter-protests, nationalist knuckleheads, wanna-be-politicians, established negationists and war-crime deniers, etc, etc.

On an additional level, when I did my brief stunt in my country's embassy, which is located not that far from Yasukuni, was I told by other Japanese staff to avoid the shrine on a specific date (most likely the July date) to avoid "getting hurt"...

And to @Ossanamerica.

I have known Yasukuni JInja for 25 effing years, so don't.you.lecture.me!

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I don't think they care at all about the war criminals, the war victims - they just go there because it goes down well with their aging, right-wing, racist voter base.

Exactly! Quite similar to those that want to keep up the Civil War memorials in the South.

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Desert TortoiseToday  08:15 am JST

What I am saying is that Japanese officials and politicians, but going there, are honoring war criminals. I am fully aware no remains are interred there, just their names. Nonetheless by going there Japanese pollies are showing respect to some of the most depraved and murderous people to ever walk the face of the Earth. Maybe you should go visit the USS Arizona Memorial and see an example of what your ancestors did to mine. 

My ancestors? I'm not Japanese. I'm just pointing out that Yasukuni Shrine is not any sort of official venue for public events like the Centotaph in London or Arlington Cemetary, and I totally agree that whatever they do in their free time, politicians should not be seen to visit the place. It's against the spirit of the Japanese Constitution not to mention a pretty sleazy PR stunt. I don't think they care at all about the war criminals, the war victims - they just go there because it goes down well with their aging, right-wing, racist voter base.

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Some interesting comments here.

Anyone who has been in Japan for any length of time knows that there is an undeniable highly nationalist right-wing element in Japan.

These politicians scuttle off to Yasukuni as a way to appease this fascist element or are we just imagining that they go to pray for peace?

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It is true. The Japanese Constitution separates religion from government, as the US occupation authorities didn't want a re-emergence of the "State Shinto" that had been one of the props of emperor worship in the militaristic wartime regime. Japan does have an official venue for commemorating the end of WW2 and mourning war dead, but Yasukuni Shrine isn't it.

What I am saying is that Japanese officials and politicians, but going there, are honoring war criminals. I am fully aware no remains are interred there, just their names. Nonetheless by going there Japanese pollies are showing respect to some of the most depraved and murderous people to ever walk the face of the Earth. Maybe you should go visit the USS Arizona Memorial and see an example of what your ancestors did to mine. There is nothing the least bit honorable about having the names of such war criminals among the veterans who did not commit war crimes. What those pollies did is repulsive and makes my blood boil. Maybe those sob pollies should pay respects at the graves of my veteran parents and of my uncles who fought those war criminals instead of honoring the very people who caused my people so much suffering.

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niko top1Today  01:16 am JST

Mao Zedong slaughtered tens of millions of people and no one regarded him as a war criminal, and even printed his head on Chinese currency.

Those people enshrined at Yasukuni Shrine aren't viewed as war criminals either by right-wing Japanese politicians either, due to them not having been convicted under Japanese law. Other war criminals were let out of prison by Americans and allowed back in positions of power where they could start exonerating their colleagues and whitewashing their activities.

People should study history well.

Who do you think think writes history in Japan?

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niko top1Today  01:16 am JST

As a person from a country invaded by Japan, I don't mind Japan's worship of its ancestors.

That's not what the politicians go there for. They're milking the issue for votes and cash. If any of them had any sincere religious beliefs these visits would be kept strictly private and out of the newspapers.

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Japanese that do not learn from history,others will remind them of their history

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Japans monarch (Naruhito) and his predecessor (Akihito) pray for peace, and do not visit this shrine, or send any ritual offerings.

Most Japanese pay respects to all war dead on 15 August at Nippon Bukokan (Zenkoku Senbotsusha Tsuitoshiki).

This little show by the LDP is not genuine.

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The lawmakers also went to give respect to the war criminals enshrined at Yasukuni.

What other nations go and pray and give respect to war criminals?

These lawmakers also have an unsteady recollection of their past modern day history and there are numerous gaffes made over the years to support this.

This is why Japan’s sudden rise in ‘defense spending ‘ is alarming.

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

As a person from a country invaded by Japan, I don't mind Japan's worship of its ancestors. During World War II, the CCP wore civilian clothes to conduct guerrilla warfare, and the CCP used civilians as a cover. Mao Zedong slaughtered tens of millions of people and no one regarded him as a war criminal, and even printed his head on Chinese currency. Russia is clearly a war criminal, and there is enough evidence. First of all, Russia violated international law and invaded a sovereign country certified by the United Nations. The Russians slaughtered large numbers of civilians, and the Russians attacked schools and hospitals. People also said there was no evidence that the Russians were war criminals. A dictator's country can falsify any evidence. Like Beijing arresting two Canadians in a hostage exchange. People should study history well.

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Japanese should show respect to their war-dead, including all politicians visiting Yasukuni Shrine

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Desert TortoiseToday  09:12 pm JST

"It's a private shrine and the government has no power over it"

If that is in fact the case, which I do not believe to be true but assuming it is,

It is true. The Japanese Constitution separates religion from government, as the US occupation authorities didn't want a re-emergence of the "State Shinto" that had been one of the props of emperor worship in the militaristic wartime regime. Japan does have an official venue for commemorating the end of WW2 and mourning war dead, but Yasukuni Shrine isn't it.

then government officials have an obligation to not patronize that shrine.

In their private time they can worship wherever they like. I guess they probably are going as private citizens, strictly speaking, but you would never guess from the song and dance they make over it.

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nayelToday  07:55 pm JST

Japan is paying a respect to their dead soldiers ,

whats wrong with that ?

That's not what this story is about. It's about politicians courting votes and cash from gullible right-wingers with fake shows of piety.

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I'd love to ask a Japanese politician some day why they revere their military so much. The Japanese military has a history of spectacular failure!

Not only did the imperial Japanese army lose WWII but they lost their previous war in Asia, about 4 hundred years earlier, with Korea.

Koreans actuality defeated the Japanese at the very height of samurai power.

Popular culture depicts the samurai as a great fighter but they were defeated by Koreans, thus saving Asia and the world from a brutal Japanese regime. Actually not enough credit is given to how Koreans saved the world from Japan at that time.

-15 ( +4 / -19 )

Its all perception, cultural ideology and what one believes. ITS HISTORY, JAPANS HISTORY that can never be erased, perhaps forgotten if one choses to do so. I believe that everyone has a right to pray, to whom ever and what ever, and if that is what they were going to do, so be it. Regardless of who they are praying to and what they are praying for. Everyone has a right to an opinion but what does that opinion mean when the opposing listeners disagree. It means simply nothing!!! The only way I see this becoming meaningless is for those who finds the visits offensive or hurting simply ignore it. After this weeks visits the rhetoric will die down and become forgotten media hype until the next time when the March to the shrine is repeated again.

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Backwards thinking people

-14 ( +5 / -19 )

It's a private shrine and the government has no power over it

If that is in fact the case, which I do not believe to be true but assuming it is, then government officials have an obligation to not patronize that shrine. These pollies are making those visits for malevolent reasons. The US, UK, Australia and the other nations who consider Japan an ally need to tell Japan to remove those war criminals from the shrine or Japan can defend itself on its own. I had family in that war and that shrine represents the people my family fought. That shrine is detestable and those who worship at the names of those war criminal are the lowest of the low.

-13 ( +4 / -17 )

Why Japanese are hated in Asia,go figure

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Paying respects to millions of war dead from the past hundreds of years. Do not see controversy in that. 

Convicted war criminals are among those being paid respect to. They deserve no respect and those who do pay respect to such vile war criminals are themselves thoroughly contemptable. Remove the names of the war criminals from that shrine now. Why is that so hard for the Japanese to do? Oh wait, that would require Japan to actually admit their barbaric past and Japan is apparently not ready to do that. Germany can do it but not Japan, so the distrust will linger.

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It is exactly events like this that make Japan's neighbors distrust Japan. It is exactly events like this that make Japan's "apologies" appear to be insincere. It is exactly events like this that make Japan's neighbors and her former enemies from WWII wonder if Japan actually learned anything from that war or are they, in the fullness of time, bound to repeat their past. Events like this undo any and all attempts by Japan to atone for their past. Too many Japanese politicians and too many who post here are utterly blind to just how despicable that shrine is to those who's families lost loved ones or had loved ones permanently disabled fighting the IJA and IJN.

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A cross-party group of more than 100 Japanese lawmakers on Friday visited Yasukuni shrine, a Shinto shrine in Tokyo regarded as a symbol of Japan's past militarism by its Asian neighbors, for its spring festival. Hidehisa Otsuji of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party and head of the group said at a press conference that they "prayed for world peace that is on the precipice"

Sure, why not?

And while you're at it, relegate more funds to support the US military bases here that are a symbol to a country that brought peace to this country and its Asian neighbors.

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Good show of guts. When others are flinging missiles all over the Sea of Japan, this is at least a beginning to signal resolve to use force if necessary. Japan should not be a prisoner of its own past.

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Paying respects to millions of war dead from the past hundreds of years. Do not see controversy in that. The only problem seems to be those who assume they go to pay respects to war criminals rather than the millions of others who died faithfully serving their nation. Those many who died and didnt commit war crimes deserve the remembrance of their leaders.

No, it does not mean I forgive the criminals. I waste no time thinking of them. I think of the average soldier, sailor and airman who died for their homeland. Doing their duty and losing their lives and futures into the bargain. They did nothing wrong and deserve to be mourned.

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21st century Japan government, people are not the present day Russian government Putin lead war criminals.

no proof or trial that Putin led government are war criminals.

There is Proof that Japanese Imperial govt were tried and convicted as War criminals.

(FYI, Right wing Politicians and hardliners visit the Shrine to celebrate Japanese Imperial past. There are Class One War Criminals celebrated there.)

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If they are really sincere, and whole heartedly, believe that going to Yakusuni is to pray for the soul and remember fellow citizens who have died and made scarifies in the wars.

Its very simple and easy, just removed those Class A war criminals. Any baggage, and bad connotation is remove. And you can visit it anytime, without any controversies.

But, that is not what they want, at least, the politicians. They want, and actively seek the controversies.

If i may, without the controversy, they may not even visit.

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The newly elected south Korean president said he wanted a forward looking relationship with Japan but this is the reality. Japanese politicians praying at a shrine to fascism.

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The first and only time I visited Yasukuni Shrine, I also happened to go into its museum. Which included various displays detailing "the history" from World War II. The museum's version of historical events seemed to suggest that Japan was "welcomed" into China and Korea. That what they did there was not a violent invasion, but a peaceful welcoming of Chinese and Korean people into Japanese society. I don't know if that part has changed since I last went, but I highly doubt it. So it's not just the war criminals enshrined there that are a problem. It's the complete white-washing of Japan's history in WWII with its Asian neighbors.

-3 ( +12 / -15 )

Go and see the museum if you like history. You can read the letters of those who were about to sacrifice their lives for a cause they know not. There is the human driven torpedo 回天and other weapons. All victims of war whichever side you’re on.

As you leave there is a guest book where people sign their names, the country they’re from and a line for comments. One year I was there a guest from England wrote a whole page much like the anti-Imperialist Japan comments here.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

gintonic

Thank you

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OssanAmerica

Today 05:50 pm JST

People who go there, both civilians and politicians who go there and pray for peace...

Interesting that you make a distinction, when in accordance with the Constitution politicians should only be going there as private citizens. When private citizens visit the shrine, as is their inalienable right, it usually doesn't get any media coverage, yet here we are reading about one particular group of private citizens. Why is that?

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Hells teeth, japans neighbours won't waste any time on fake Indignation on a group of misguided politicians.

Yet present day, be composite in act of geocide of there own people.

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Never visited the place, or the museum next door., Father offered to accompany me on a trip.

But I shopped. Who needs it.

gintonic, i am not going there."

Fair enough....agree with you on that.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

How many lawmakers does Japan has/need??

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

gintonic, i am not going there.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

They condemn Russia, but they just casually visit shrine glorifying imperial war criminals."

That is a gross historic distortion of the facts.21st century Japan government, people are not the present day Russian government Putin lead war criminals."

How's that a distortion of facts? The above poster only said " 21st century Jgovt/ people" visit the shrine...that is an undisputable fact, it doesn't distort anything, whether you agree with the visits or not.

-17 ( +8 / -25 )

I wonder how would people back in my continent react if Scholz and his party or Draghi and his coalition would send prayers to nazists and fascists.

On the other hand in a few days in Italy they celebrate the day of freedom which is april 25th.

The liberation of Italy from fascim,and it’s a national celebration.

Will ever Japan celebrate the day when the allied freed them from dictatorship?

I highly doubt it.

-12 ( +12 / -24 )

I would just like the youth of japan released from being held responsible, simply because 100 lawmakers visit Yasukuni shrine.

Never visited the place, or the museum next door., Father offered to accompany me on a trip.

But I shopped. Who needs it.

Younger members of my J family just don't want to know.

Its is BTS or broke

This reason alone is why education is the key.

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There we go again,the same old ultra right wingers incompetent politicians who cares only of making money and restore the lost “honour” of their grandfathers like Kishida etc.

And the Japanese people mindlessly still vote them.

-13 ( +14 / -27 )

Going to Yasukuni is an act of utter impotence.

-8 ( +12 / -20 )

Would perhaps have been a larger gathering but the steak restaurant across the street can only seat a hundred.

Japan’s ‘lawmakers’ definitely would not want to be seen in a bad light by violating any kind of restrictions.

-3 ( +11 / -14 )

They condemn Russia, but they just casually visit shrine glorifying imperial war criminals.

That is a gross historic distortion of the facts.

21st century Japan government, people are not the present day Russian government Putin lead war criminals.

7 ( +27 / -20 )

They condemn Russia, but they just casually visit shrine glorifying imperial war criminals.

-12 ( +21 / -33 )

blueToday  05:13 pm JST

The "infatuation" or "obsession" (for lack of a better word) of the LDP with a place associated with death and what can only be described as large-scaled tragedies (i.e. wars) is simply put: baffling.

It;s only baffling to you because you don't see Yasukuni for what it really is a place where the souls of 2,466,532 men, women, children, and even animals are honored. It is a place associated with Japan's "history" not "death". These are people who have died in wars since the 1800s. People who go there, both civilians and politicians who go there and pray for peace and the fallen are following a long established tradition. This really has nothing to do with WWII other than (1) 14 Class-A War Criminals were added in 1970, (2) some right wing nutbags put on a show there occasionally and (3) China and South Korea have turned it into a focal point of anti-Japan sentiment and a diplomatic/political tool.

Truth is, people who visit Yasukuni, whether right wing or not. aren't invading other countries and killing women and children.

0 ( +23 / -23 )

Going to Yasukuni Shirne is the Japanese version of pointless virtue signalling. In this case, the "virtues" are loving the nation and revering their "war heroes". In the end, it achieves nothing of value besides helping them cling to the votes of the people who won't rent out their apartments to foreigners.

-6 ( +15 / -21 )

The "infatuation" or "obsession" (for lack of a better word) of the LDP with a place associated with death and what can only be described as large-scaled tragedies (i.e. wars) is simply put: baffling.

Don't get me wrong, back in Europe we also have official memorial ceremonies but these are marked by gravitas, sadness and statements to never repeat the mistakes of the past. They are also cross-nation as wars generate misery for all participants.

Here in Japan, so-called "lawmakers" seem on the contrary to be up and roaring if not upbeat about the whole thing, like a picnic of sorts.

Sometimes I feel like, should Yasukuni ever want to start a bed and breakfast or lodging business on their premises, would it be fully booked by LDP lawmakers all through the year.

Simply put: baffling...Especially, as I would think most blue-blooded participants to have less a chance of having had any family members actually enshrined there as compared to average Taro and Naoko...

Wouldn't we all like the LDP to care more about "living" Japanese over "dead" ones?

-6 ( +16 / -22 )

Others were members of the main opposition Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan, the Japan Innovation Party and independents.

An Avenger-like coalition of heroes swooping in to help Japanese people in their time of need and show multi-partisan initiative.

If only they could actually go to work instead of coordinated exercises regression.

0 ( +13 / -13 )

Please enlighten me how the next generation will ever be able to shake off past imperialism when present day politicians won't let go of the past.

I huff and puff about SK government blatant abuse of international law.

But It takes two to tango.

-2 ( +20 / -22 )

Well, the culture is based on groupism.

-13 ( +12 / -25 )

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