politics

Hashimoto says he'll resign at end of term after referendum setback

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I don't think much of Hashimoto but the turkeys have voted for Christmas in this one.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Well Mr Hashimoto, let's see you keep your promise. (But I will bet that somewhere along the line he will find a way to stay in politics by saying something like "The people need me, so I will serve" or some other BS.)

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

Good riddance! (Or are we to expect a Farage?)

2 ( +6 / -4 )

He plans to resign something or other about every six months or so, doesn't he?

http://www.google.com/search?q=hashimoto

5 ( +7 / -2 )

ill believe it when I see it. But i have to admit, if merging saves 270 billion yen there must be something wrong with the system.

Many of my Japanese friends wondered what exactly would change, they felt it wasnt explained well enough, i think that cost hashimoto a lot of votes.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I feel chagrined at the election of status quo.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Score one for people power in Osaka!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

What a philosophical conundrum. Ont the one hand, I think the plan was most likely a good one. The current system (from Tokyo) seems inefficient. On the other hand, if this is what it took to get a Putin-like troll, as Hashimoto surely is, off the national stage,......

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Sad,but not unexpected.The forces of the status quo prevailed.And you know they are doing a good job....NOT.But the people are going to have to learn the hard way that if you want improvement then nothing comes for free.Even change.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Hashimoto says he will retire every time he doesn't get his own way

4 ( +6 / -2 )

"A chance to change Osaka", GONE!

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Proponents said it would save the city’s 2.7 million people a hefty 270 billion yen over the next 17 years and make it easier to sell Osaka as a venue for business or big sports fixtures.

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

If he said more realistic numbers, he might got his wish. He forgot Japanese are good in numbers. So, many people just thought this is his usual habit of lie..

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Once again that fear of change will cost Japan and its next generation a huge amount in the long term. Just kepp digging themselves into a deeper hole

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

The Osaka people down voted the plan due to massive initial costs but more so the centralization and increased governance by a select few, the system now is slow and beauraucratic however it gives a bit more democracy in the number of voices being heard in Osaka. reducing it to five territories and giving rule of larger portions of the city to a few, many feared would lead to a less democratic process and a lean towards those who have wealth and political or corporate influence to dictate even more than now at tge expense of Osakas socially diverse population.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Hashimoto says he'll resign at end of term after referendum

Excellent news.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Yesterday, the Japan Times used Izumisano in southwest Osaka Pref. as an example of dying cities. Yet they are in close proximity to busy Kansai International Airport. There is an cool looking skyscraper south of the Nankai station that I've been told is mostly abandoned. Tourists don't stop in those suburban places in their rush to the more famous locales.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Voters followed the status quo - big surprize.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Well, if it was saving money, whether millions or billions, they should have voted for it!

I don't like Hashimoto that much any more ... but I think that it was a good idea.

Whether he will resign or not .... time will show.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Once again that fear of change will cost Japan and its next generation a huge amount in the long term. Just kepp digging themselves into a deeper hole

Its the older people that are screwing over their grandchildren, or their friends' grandchildren. Every age group except over 70s was voting for the change. Unfortunately there are a lot of old people, and they have nothing else to do but go vote. Until they find out a way to put an age limit on the voting or at least scale the votes based on age, this will just repeat again and again (assuming there is ever someone like Hashimoto willing to force a change to begin with).

If he said more realistic numbers, he might got his wish. He forgot Japanese are good in numbers. So, many people just thought this is his usual habit of lie..

Uh, no. Actually it was the most ghetto areas of Osaka that voted against Hashimoto's plan. Maybe they are afraid they won't get their free money while remaining jobless and playing pachinko all day.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Dislike Hashimoto with a passion. Between his regular threats to resign (there have been many), his onerous public persona and his grandstanding in a public capacity (specifically commenting on matters still before the court), the good folks of Osaka might be well shot of him.

That being said, however, I will miss him for his tirades against certain far-right racists and his willingness to take on the political-bureaucratic establishment. Indeed, I still don't understand how the vested interests down in Osaka managed to nobble what seemed to be a good idea.

Finally, anybody who believes Hashimoto is walking away from politics is a loon. Just look at the track record of his contemporaries. The current governor of Tokyo has been in and out of politics for years. The former mayor of Yokohama who drove city finances into the ground tried his hand at national politics as well. Old Blinky Ishihara was also a serial offender. Second-rate novelist, third-rate national MP and fourth-rate governor and shrill to boot. Let's face it, politics in Japan is essentially terminal employment. All of them are like Romulus and Remus, their mouths firmly pressed to the teats of public largesse. Their ownly problem is that the she-wolf cannot feed them all.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

This is probably a good outcome. Quite simply, it's never a good idea to give more power to someone who has contempt for the democratic process.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

I love Hashimoto with a pasion, as one of the few politicians that can and does "slash waste, cut out administrative duplication" under which Japan is sinking so I will be very sad to see him (and Japan) go. I hope he reconsiders.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

He's said that 2-3 times now and then changes his mind

3 ( +4 / -1 )

timtak

I love Hashimoto with a pasion

Hashimoto's views are absurd and dangerous, I think it's better to see him go and replaced by a better leader.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Although I hate the guys comments and experience, I think it is a really good idea for Japan to have two capitals. Not only would it allow Japan to survive a major earthquake in Tokyo, but, to have a rivalry between the two mega-centers would lead to much needed competition, opportunity, democracy and innovation. Just, he's the wrong guy.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Isn't this the third time Hashimoto has promised to retire? He can't even keep THAT promise! I bet you somewhere between now and December he finds a way to renege on the promise to retire from politics, saying, "The closeness of the vote is proof that I am right, and the people need me to stay on and see my wishes realized", etc. etc., that he's not at all doing it for himself, but for the people.

The fact of the matter is this was never about the people of Osaka. It was about Hashimoto's arrogance -- and still is. It was about putting Osaka's current debt for white elephant projects into limbo, while increasing the power of companies outside of Osaka's central region but that have a lot of sway and power in the area. Less 'bureaucracy' means less resistance for them to control things, while the people of Osaka have less say in the decision making because of the more centralized power. And there's NO proof this would have saved any money in the long term, but a LOT of proof it would have put Osaka into further debt in the short term. When asked to detail how it would save money, all Hashimoto and others could chant was, "getting rid of redundancy", but never any details or plans.

It's good this failed. Perhaps now Osaka can look for an ACTUAL way to move forward instead of just trying to head into the future by copying Tokyo's past.

Shall we start a pool on how long it'll be before Hashimoto reneges and decides he's "needed" in politics?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Good but not the best outcome. This plan to disband Osaka City and create 5 semi-autonomous wards should have been voted down a lot more thoroughly. Few can deny that Hashimoto is an exceptionally good orator and negotiator. And what he says (or more like how he says it) is often very convincing. But (and this is really, really, a big but) he is a liar through and through. Just to take one example, a few years ago when this plan was first proposed Hashimoto and his cohorts said they could generate 400 billion extra yen annually. After a lot of questions were thrown at the figure, that figure went down sharply and towards the end of their campaign they said they could create a total of 270 billion yen in the 17 years after the plan was carried out. From 400 billion yen a year to 270 billion yen in the 17 years! That figure of 270 billion is also very doubtful, according to may experts. I just hope he will keep his promise this one last time.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

To reiterate what I posted earlier, the public persona of Hashimoto isn't all bad. Sure he used to waltz around on TV like a demagogue ponce, sure his outrageous comments regarding various aspects of World War were highly offensive, and sure as a lawyer he should know better than blab about cases still before the court.

However, name me another conservative politician in Japan who willingly put the boot into the Zaitokukai (the infamous race hate group). Ditto, any politician of note who has teed off on Kasumigaseki (the national government mandarins).

I might not like Hashimoto personally, but he certainly added a bit of color to political debate. Indeed, I would like him to keep contributing to that debate from the sidelines, rather than slinking back to the black hole that is terrestrial TV here in Japan.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The happiest people this morning are the ranks of bureaucrats inventing themselves jobs and schemes and pulling the wool over the people's eyes and keeping the media at arm's length. They have won a famous victory. Time to dip into those secret stashes of taxpayers' money and award themselves some trip to an onsen, for research, of course.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Hongo: "However, name me another conservative politician in Japan who willingly put the boot into the Zaitokukai (the infamous race hate group). Ditto, any politician of note who has teed off on Kasumigaseki (the national government mandarins)."

Very true! I DID like him for that, indeed. But his arrogance and pet-projects like this, not to mention his racism, misogyny, and sense of self-entitlement outweighed his good points far too much.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

I know my friends who work for the City of Osaka will be happy as their salaries have been decreasing as he took office. I used to complain about Hashimoto all the time then I was reminded that I live outside of Osaka and his policies have nothing to do with me and how I live my life. It is like being in California but complaining about laws of Oregon.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This time he will retire from Ohsaka politics but he will not be forgotten by media fpr his colorful outspoken attitude. He peobably become popular politic analyst. Being cute will help him to become TV guest speaker He will chew up LDP dogmas..

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

DaDude: "I used to complain about Hashimoto all the time then I was reminded that I live outside of Osaka and his policies have nothing to do with me and how I live my life"

There is nothing wrong about complaining about a person who's views, and the power to shape politics based on said views, are as horrible as his are. Just look at how he views sex-slaves, Nazis, etc. You don't have to live in Tokyo, for example, to have the right to complain about Ishihara when he was in office, or Abe now, although granted Abe's selfish decisions and heinous views of history have a more direct affect on national politics.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Normally I'd say that Hashimoto's plan was sensible. Let's hope someone more level-headed raises the merger again in the future

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I would say that Hashimoto skewed the vote a bit by announcing he would "retire" if the referendum was voted down. Many people who voted no could have been voting no to get rid of Hashimoto but who really can trust the proposal. I hope in the future the discussion is raised again to help improve the efficiency of the government services in Osaka - both in speed and also costs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He will be back.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

He will be back.

Yes, you can't keep a fervent right-winger down. They always float to the top again

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Many of my Japanese friends wondered what exactly would change, they felt it wasnt explained well enough, i think that cost hashimoto a lot of votes.

Explaining anything well enough in politics is a recipe for getting special interest groups riled.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

if you can read japanese, read this. http://blogos.com/article/112242/

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

He's not going anywhere. They just die and keep resurrecting. Zombie politics.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

He will go back to tv talento land where he reached his highest level of productivity. Being a leader is beyond him unfortunately. And Osaka is now the worse for his years in office, mostly wasted on his own ego.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Any sensible individual should notice how sophistic Hashimoto is. His arguments don't appeal to reason but are composed of acting, gestures and frequent ignoratio elenchi. No wonder so many people feel/think that there are too many things unexplained.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Clearly he lost because the civil servants who would have been most affected all voted no.It's common knowledge that Yokohama which is bigger than Osaka in area and population and the de facto no.2 city of Japan has fewer public servants than Osaka.Streamlining is a necessity to cut the fat of waste.Sometimes you only get one chance and with how Japan operates that was it. The struggle hate that foreigners on here have for Hashimoto is weak as. Back in your home countries you can find a politician in power as f'd as him,but the venom is about as strong as when Obama first came into office.Most of yous don't even live in Kansai,let alone Osaka,but the opportunity to spout your personal frustrations due to your own missteps, have become as annoying and repetitive as your desire to see him leave office.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

that good. hopefully his replacement will bring with him/her new ideas. new ideas is needed, or else, the economy will be in free-fall as already seemed to be case.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@cracaphat

"Clearly he lost because the civil servants who would have been most affected all voted no."

They didn't help I'm sure, but the only age group that voted no overall were the over 70s (this is official data). So the only reason it didn't pass was because of an overwhelming number of old people, who were scared they would have to start paying to ride the bus (this was an actual reason given by elderly people interviewed). Scare the elderly and you win. A common LDP tactic.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I bet 10,000 yen that he won't.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

that good. hopefully his replacement will bring with him/her new ideas. new ideas is needed, or else, the economy will be in free-fall as already seemed to be case.

Maybe in another million years, someone will bring new ideas. If Osaka wants change, Hashimoto will have to change his mind again and give it another go. But still, Japan needs to fix the voting process. Its too easy to target the old people who are afraid of change, easily scared, and could care less how much the younger working people are taxed as long as they get their free bus rides and other services.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Good riddance.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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