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Japan's two biggest opposition parties to join forces in Diet

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Bit late dont ya think? The time to join forces is well before an election to give the people an opportunity to find out what you are all about!

This is a knee-jerk reaction in response to your losing once again, and personally speaking I am going to wait and see what makes you any different that just cut-out LDP wannabe's before I choose to vote for any of you in any election!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

So wait... the CDPJ and the DPP are joining hands.

But weren't the CDPJ and the DPP basically the offshoots of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) that couldn't get along, so in 2016 split (along with a bunch of other mergings and junk)?

So they were together... then split... and are now together again?

Gah. As bad as the LDP is, with this clown car of an opposition in place, it'd take an epidemic of catastrophic proportions to create political change in the Diet.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Will they call themselves the peoples front of Japan or the popular front?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Will they call themselves the peoples front of Japan or the popular front?

SPLITTERS!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

WIth Abe's term finishing next year they will probably try take control again.

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What a waste of time. Join as many tiny parties as you like together, you will never challenge the LDP! People want strength, stability and experience, which the LDP has.

Time for these minor parties to do the right thing by the public, and start engaging in the talks about the Constitution Reform.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

I'm sure they will be splitting up again soon, probably just before the next election. Too many egos and too few positions of importance in a single party makes this inevitable.

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And this way, more and more start losing interests in Ex-DPJ and eventually in politics

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Surely an article like this should show what this means NUMERICALLY???

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Huh. I can't see what good that's going to do unless they can present a viable set of alternative policies to the government's, in which case they'd be better off just merging into a single party.

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What a mess! As a Korean living across the sea, I really wish a more progressive and competent Japan. LDP in power for ever? How can this be even possible in a modern democracy?

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And what policies and values do these parties represent?

Could never understand Japanese politics.

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I am cautiously optimistic because having a stronger opposition in a country that for the moment is ruled by a one party policy, and a bad one at that, should normally be a good thing.

However it needs to be seen if they have enough common ground and what program they will present to the voters.

All to often we have seen such alliances collapse in the past due to internal struggles so let's hope this one cam last.

Every attempt to push Abe and his LDP from power is welcome before they run Japan completely into the ground.

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indier99Today  01:46 pm JST

What a mess! As a Korean living across the sea, I really wish a more progressive and competent Japan. LDP in power for ever? How can this be even possible in a modern democracy?

Japan is only a democracy in the sense that the legislative process is democratic. The elections to choose the legislators certainly aren't.

Mister XToday  04:07 pm JST

However it needs to be seen if they have enough common ground and what program they will present to the voters.

I think the only program they will present is criticising the LDP and tabling pointless no-confidence motions in the Diet that the LDP majority will of course not pass.

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Ganbare Japan!Today 08:45 am JST

What a waste of time. Join as many tiny parties as you like together, you will never challenge the LDP! People want strength, stability and experience, which the LDP has.

Never challenge the LDP! Doesn't sound very democratic.

In a mature democracy, it's the option of choice (and the taking of those options) that makes those countries govts accountable.

Opposing parties and their voices is what creates balance and an environment where inclined-to-be despots rule is always limited.

Smaller parties combined voice is one way of keeping pressure on the ruling incumbent politicians.

Seeking a one party solution with strength, stability and experience, so no one gets a look in as is the case with the LDP, and marry this with mass media de facto control (Japan is ranked low on the Freedom of Media Index) is decidedly communistic in my reading.

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browny1Today  04:23 pm JST

*Ganbare Japan!Today 08:45 am JST: **What a waste of time. Join as many tiny parties as you like together, you will never challenge the LDP! People want strength, stability and experience, which the LDP has.*

Never challenge the LDP! Doesn't sound very democratic.

Perhaps he meant "never defeat" or "never seriously challenge" the LDP. The way things are looking it's a hard point to argue - the opposition certainly do not look like a threat to the LDP's hegemony, but it's not because of the LDP's strength, stability or experience. A lot of the time it's down to the fact that old folks have been voting for the local good old boy for generations and he just happens to be in the LDP. Or else people just don't see much point in swapping one bunch of corrupt, out-of-touch incompetents for another lot who haven't shown themselves to be any better.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Time for these minor parties to do the right thing by the public, and start engaging in the talks about the Constitution Reform.

Why? Every single opinion indicates people are not interested in Abe,s little pet project but want the govt to focus on the social net & economy and creating a fair society ...and by focusing they mesn not mismanaging and screwing things up. Thats what all parties should be talking about ....the Constitutional reform ranks way down the list of priorities of anyone but Shinzo.

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Indier99:

South Korea isn't too hot either. Nearly every president has been arrested after term. Sweden, New Zealand, and Switzerland are better role models for both countries...and the US.

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marcelitoToday  06:31 pm JST

"Time for these minor parties to do the right thing by the public, and start engaging in the talks about the Constitution Reform."

Why? Every single opinion indicates people are not interested in Abe,s little pet project but want the govt to focus on the social net & economy and creating a fair society ...and by focusing they mesn not mismanaging and screwing things up. Thats what all parties should be talking about ....the Constitutional reform ranks way down the list of priorities of anyone but Shinzo.

But trying to do anything about the economy and society would just be too hard and alienate a lot of vested interests. Focusing on constitutional reform basically means Abe can keep his right-wing base happy enough to keep supporting him even if he never actually achieves anything.

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@juminRhee

South Korea isn't too hot either. Nearly every president has been arrested after term. Sweden, New Zealand, and Switzerland are better role models for both countries...and the US.

Who said that Japan should learn from SK? There's no role model for a country's democracy. Besides, I don't think a country that puts its presidents on trial and holds them accountable is a bad democracy.

That said, however, I don't understand why Japanese voters fail to change power despite all the ruling party politicians' scandals that have been exposed for the last few years. Does the bizarre and anachronistic name-writing ballot system has anything to do with this?

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Sorry, I shouldve clarified: presidents being jailed after leaving office. If they did something wrong, why not impeach while in office? Seems like how they deal with elections in some African countries. I personally don't think there should be one chief executive in a winner take all. Either 7 coequal councillors (swiss) or full parliamentary with safeguards (ie reserve executive symbol of state president, and a political leader - prime minister).

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