politics

Japan's legacy of forced labor haunts ties with neighbors

65 Comments
By YURI KAGEYAMA

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The better path for the Mitsubishi and for Japan would be to offer (yet another) apology and a pension to those few still living. It's a small thing to do for a few people and would put articles like this to rest.

-8 ( +14 / -22 )

I wonder how decades more will Japan's neighboring countries will keep this up? Japan had already apologized while its neighboring countries have refused to accept these apologies, what else do they want?

12 ( +30 / -18 )

The forcing of other people to slave like conditions is unjustifiable; yet, Japanese have also been forced to labor for others in other parts of the world in past history,

In United States,

https://scholars.org/contribution/lessons-incarceration-and-forced-labor-japanese-americans-during-world-war-ii

In Brazil,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Brazilians

In Peru,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Peruvians

Elsewhere,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Japan

5 ( +18 / -13 )

@Peter Neil

The better path for the Mitsubishi and for Japan would be to offer (yet another) apology and a pension to those few still living.

Actually Mitsubishi and other Japanese companies caught in forced laborer lawsuit want to settle and pay out the verdicts.

It is Abe san who forbade them from settling. So Japanese companies hands are tied.

@Toshihiro

I wonder how decades more will Japan's neighboring countries will keep this up?

Until the next war. China vs Japan and Korea vs Japan wars are inevitable; it's not a matter of if, but when.

-16 ( +5 / -21 )

Even today the Fourth Geneva Convention allows an occupying military to compel able-bodied civilians to provide certain types of forced labour so long as they are compensated and the methods of compulsion are not excessively cruel.

The failure of the media to clarify this point creates the false impression that the forced labour itself was some sort of war crime, rather than the more subjective issue of whether the compensation and treatment was fair and reasonable.

8 ( +20 / -12 )

I wonder how decades more will Japan's neighboring countries will keep this up? Japan had already apologized while its neighboring countries have refused to accept these apologies, what else do they want?

If there has been a previous apology expressed with genuine remorse, then repeating the apology would not be arduous - it would be natural.

The problem is that there was no remorse attached. Even above, slave labour is described as "unfortunate" by the slave owning corporation. Hardly the language of genuine contrition.

Last week images of Hiroshima were broadcast around the world. No one questioned why the Japanese were still banging on about the atomic bombings.

-3 ( +17 / -20 )

They need to stop bringing this up. The issue had been settled in 1965.. Don't apologize again and by all means don't pay reparations again. These people and their govt will never let it rest.

9 ( +22 / -13 )

@Ah_so

The problem is that there was no remorse attached.

It's not the lack of remorse, but an outright denial.

Was the Kono statement(Acknowledgement that Imperial Japanese state forcibly conscripted comfort women) of 1993 remorseful? Yes.

Was the Murayama statement(Apology for the pain and suffering to Asian neighbors caused by Imperial Japan) of 1995 remorseful? Yes.

Was the Abe statement of 2015 remorseful? Absolutely not. Not only was the Abe statement not remorseful, Abe actively denied the the fact that Imperial Japanese state forcibly conscripted comfort women as acknowledged by the Kono statement of 1993, he blamed it on "private individuals" for shady deeds and denied that Japanese state had anything to do with it.

Not only did Abe deny the culpability and guilt of Imperial Japan in the Abe statement of 2015, he also said enough is enough and let's forget the past and walk toward a brighter future together. To accomplish this, Abe san actively started deleting the crimes account of Imperial Japan from Japan's history textbooks.

This is why Japan's relationships with its neighbors has fallen to an all time low.

Relations between Japan and its neighbors were relatively until Abe came to power in 2012. Of course there were hiccups here and there, but nothing that couldn't have been managed diplomatically. It was subsequently history revisionism and denial on Abe's part that is the root cause behind current tensions between Japan and its neighbors.

-7 ( +12 / -19 )

@speed

They need to stop bringing this up. The issue had been settled in 1965..

It could have been settled in 1965, if Japanese negotiators didn't demand the deletion of the word "damages" from the treat text. But since the word "damages" were deleted from the treaty text at Japanese negotiator's insistence, Japanese companies are now fully held liable for damages of their actions from 1910 to 1945.

Don't apologize again

Actually Japan has the obligation to apologize again and again and to never forget, until the end of time.

Just listen to what Angela Merkel had to say about the sins of Nazi Germany.

https://www.channel3000.com/merkel-speaks-of-deep-shame-on-1st-auschwitz-visit-as-german-leader/

Merkel speaks of ‘deep shame’ on 1st Auschwitz visit as German leader

As part of her visit, Merkel also officially announced Germany would provide additional €60 million ($67 million) in funding for the conservation of the memorial, saying it will be forever the responsibility of the German nation to ensure the victims are remembered.

“Remembering the crimes … is a responsibility which never ends. It belongs inseparably to our country. To be aware of this responsibility is part of our national identity,” she said.

Germany has a responsibility to forever remember the crimes of Nazi Germany.

Japan has a responsibility to forever remember the crimes of Imperial Japan.

-5 ( +15 / -20 )

@Samit

You posted that It is Abe san who forbade them from settling.

Do you have an links to stories in reliable media that discuss this? I don't doubt that it's true, I'd just like to read more about it. Thanks.

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

The compensation issues were “completely and finally solved" by a treaty in 1965

Form the history, Japan had compensated and apologized at the 1965 treaty settled finally by both countries but The problem is S Korean government did not give any compensation money (from Japan) to its own people. The government used all money for prospective companies for the future.

13 ( +17 / -4 )

There are much bigger social and economic issues to resolve than obtain money (by court order) from Japan. For example, the Korean economy and housing are giant issues affecting thousands of Koreans. Drop this issue and move your country forward. Inflaming hatred from Korea to Japan or Japan to Korea is pointless and will lead to nothing positive. Take a deep breath, and say as a united people, "we choose to move forward and not live in the past, regardless who is at fault."

7 ( +15 / -8 )

Forced Labor?

Lets call it for what it is and that is SLAVERY which Japan

won’t recognize and actively seeks to hide.

The people of Japan are also never shown the truth about the crimes of their ancestors.

Where are the memorials to war victims in Japan?

I have never seen any...

-7 ( +11 / -18 )

Japan suffers from a historical amnesia, except that, it's not an amnesia, but a government-driven and institutionalized policy of information suppression, and disinformation intended to make sure every new generation remains completely ignorant of what actually happened during World War Two, and instead have a twisted version of the events.

It's really remarkable if you think about it. When people think about "brainwashing", they probably imagine some CIA agents pressing down on somebody on a chair while a doctor in a white coat injects some electrical devices into their brain. In reality, brainwashing happens every day, all the time. The old deception by omission is probably the most efficient brainwashing technique that is being used.

This is not limited to Japan at all. It's absolutely the same in Europe, (and America regarding "foreign enemies") it's just that they don't get the same attention, because their victims aren't as well developed as South Korea. If South Korea wasn't as developed as it is, it's likely that we wouldn't have even heard about these issues.

I still remember couple of years ago when some English politician said something along the lines of "British Empire has never done anything wrong". I can't remember the exact words, but it was something along those lines. It's not just one politician either, the average person in England knows absolutely nothing (accurate) about what their country did in the past. The general sentiment is that "Yeah, we [[might have done]] some bad stuff, but we also did a lot good, so no need to focus on the bad". Sounds familiar? Exactly what you would hear from the average Japanese.

There are still statues in many European countries of generals who were equivalent to Tojo or similarly ranked military leaders.

My opinion is that, realistically speaking, these historical issues between Japan and its neighbors will continue until there is a serious demographic change in Japan. The non-ethnically Japanese population would have to increase to at least 20/30 percent minimum, while most people in the country would have to become really liberal minded. It's only when people don't feel that ethnic identity attachment to history that actual changes can happen. Until then, these issues will remain, as the historical perception of the country is just a deep identity issue for most Japanese people. It touches their identity and their entire culture. Without the disassociation of identity and State, the most that can be hoped for is for the Japanese side to become more soft and gentle in whitewashing their history, much like England, and most other European countries. They might start admitting their crimes in some way while keeping their population oblivious at the same time.

-2 ( +11 / -13 )

@Alfie Noakes

Do you have an links to stories in reliable media that discuss this? 

https://books.google.com/books?id=5xM0AFEAmc4C&pg=PA39&lpg=PA39&source=bl&ots=HWg6cwJRux&sig=ACfU3U1kvawfzhaSo23TgWABuVkUfRy3zQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjcj_uy45HrAhWKmHIEHRwLC8c4ChDoATACegQIBRAB#v=onepage

Japanese Steel NKK Corp. also settled outside of the court.

The Fujikoshi Corp. case was also settled outside of the court.

I know for a fact that NKK settled prior cases out of court in Japan and also offered to settle cases out of court in Korea according to plaintiff's lawyers. So why isn't NKK's case settled in Korea? NKK is forbidden from doing so by Abe, according to plaintiff's lawyers.

-7 ( +9 / -16 )

This kind of articles can be shown here is so called progressiveness of democracy. I don't think you can see this sort of thing in a Korean media.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

@yosun

This kind of articles can be shown here is so called progressiveness of democracy

I assure you this article cannot be shown to Japanese public in Japanese language by Japanese press.

-6 ( +10 / -16 )

Please put the past to rest. These old issues are doing nothing but creating hate. We have present and future issues that need attention and our present actions can change the future FOR THE GOOD. I hope.

5 ( +14 / -9 )

I think the article mention should have mentioned that one of the infamous slave-using mining companies was that of Taro Aso's family,

0 ( +11 / -11 )

@Samit - thanks.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

Korean Groundhog Day

1 ( +12 / -11 )

This is between the company and the forced slave laborers. I can't see how 総理大臣 has any power to do that.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

I assure you this article cannot be shown to Japanese public in Japanese language by Japanese press.

Really? As the article stated, “When the wooden stick broke, the beating went on with a shovel that was picked up. He was beaten until pieces of torn skin stuck to the metal. His face got twisted, and he collapsed, not even able to scream,” Yeom was quoted as saying in Hayashi's 1981 book, “Forced Into Forced Labor."

??????

10 ( +14 / -4 )

“Japanese have never seriously faced up to the realities of the devastating abuse Japan brought to neighboring nations and their people,” said Masaru Tonomura, a professor of history at the University of Tokyo.

In fact, Hashima, where Korean conscript laborers were forced to work has for some unknown reason been included on the UN's list of designated cultural properties by Japan. What's the opposite of "regret"?

-10 ( +5 / -15 )

If there has been a previous apology expressed with genuine remorse, then repeating the apology would not be arduous - it would be natural.

The problem is that there was no remorse attached. Even above, slave labour is described as "unfortunate" by the slave owning corporation. Hardly the language of genuine contrition.

Take a good look at America and see where constantly apologizing and groveling for forgiveness leads you.

Japan is smart not to go down that path; they know that it's never enough for some people. They'll chew you up and spit you out. And the slippery slope will start with Korea and end with China demanding Japan get on its knees.

No thanks!

6 ( +14 / -8 )

If antagonisms between the two important U.S. allies are to heal, both sides must try to meet halfway, said Kim Gwang-yol, a professor at Seoul’s Kwangwoon University.

“Both countries need to make concessions and reach a comprise,” Kim said.

Umm, no professor Kim. Not both sides, South Korea is the one that needs to show that its word can be trusted and that it will stop beating a very dead horse. Why would the Japanese government or any Japanese corporation want to make any attempts at further apologies or compensation, when the South Korean government and the anti-Japanese nationalists will find some way to eventually undermine it and then rule it invalid?

Again, look at what happened to the 2015 landmark comfort women apology and compensation given by the government of Japan, at the time which a certain South Korean politician crowed that this was final say in the matter. Many of us knew better, and true to form, the anti-Japan nationalists did what they could to convince some comfort women not to accept the apology or compensation (as they did with the Asian Women's fund back in the late 1990's). And the subsequent South Korean president nullified the entire thing, and no one knew what was happening with or happened to the money already allocated to the fund (one of the South Koreans in charge of the funding committed suicide when it was discovered she was using the funding for her own personal use, how utterly despicable is that).

There will always be an excuse for the South Koreans and their anti-Japan supporters to perpetuate anti-Japanese sentiments for eternity. It is indoctrinated among its citizens from a very young age, and to this day they perpetuate falsehoods that the Japanese government has 'never' apologized for its past.

Why would any government or corporation, when faced with this reality, ever want to commit to offering yet another round of apologies or compensation offers, when it will be ignored, glossed over, and eventually nullified?

2 ( +12 / -10 )

""Survivors of the camps, their families and supporters are still seeking compensation and atonement for the labor and suffering. The companies, among the biggest names in Japan Inc., such as Mitsubishi and Mitsui, say such issues were settled by a treaty decades ago.""

Shame on the companies that were involved for one.

Then JAPAN IS STILL DOING THE SAME but under a different program name! they call it TRAINING now a days as we read this article, thousands of LOW paid wages laborers are being brought and subjected to live in substandard condition, long work hours with NO overtime paid, NO health care, NO contact with the locals, NO cell phones, and NO driving allowed on a 2 or 3 years visa contract.

Some wants to return back to their countries but can't till the contract is over.

0 ( +9 / -9 )

Until South Korea agrees to an Arbitration per the 1965 Treaty to clearly establish whether the Treaty has already covered this issue, the whole South Korean court actions are a monkey show. Why does the South Korean government refuse to go to Arbitration per the Treaty? This is the exact purpose of the clause. To resolve any difference in interpretation.

Furthermore, under the 1965 Treaty money was paid by Japan that was suppose to go to such workers. Whatever became of this???

"1,103 South Koreans sue their gov't over wartime labor at Japan firms"

https://japantoday.com/category/politics/1-103-South-Koreans-sue-their-gov%27t-over-wartime-labor-at-Japan-firms

5 ( +13 / -8 )

""compensation and atonement for the labor and suffering""

Yes indeed, Not just Japan, but the U.S. England, France, Spain, and all other colonial nation should continue to seek their victims if and when they voice their claims, money provide some comfort at their late ages, at least pay the their fair wages before they die.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

As an ethnic Japanese, I personally think that we can never apologise ENOUGH for invading multiple countries, raping and murdering thousands and thousands of people, looting national treasures and ending Korea's royal bloodline and more.

I understand that it's a fine balance for the government however. We don't want people to think that we're bending our knee to Korea every single time.

If Japanese companies want to operate in Korea, we need to build a better reputation with their people. If people have been victimized and request compensation, let's compensate to repair relationships and continue operating in Korea.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

Far from over !

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The issue was already discussed and settled in the 1965 treaty. Payments for Korean labours were also made from Japan accordingly. The latest move is trying to violate or nullify the treaty.

If Korea seeks any "new" deal, first refund all the money (in present-day value) originally aimed at Korean labours. It's unreasonable and unjust to make a double charge. Japan would also be entitle to assets left in Korea, seized by local Korean authorities (which were renounced in order to conclude the 1965 treaty). Ironically the supreme court verdict (if nullifying the treaty) would allow former Japanese expats or private entities to counter-reclaim seized assets.

The Moon administration remains elusive and irresponsible. They stress they respect and follow the 1965 treaty while no specific action has been made to solve the case. The treaty even proposes that an arbitration panel at ICJ be set up in case of further conflict arising in the future. Although the Japan side has reasonably suggested an arbitration, the Korea side has so far rejected it. Moon is using a cheating double-mouth tactic.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

This same stuff over and over,

1) As many mentioned here, it was already settled in 1965 treaty. It is Korean government's responsibility to distribute money it got from Japan to these people.

Koreans sued their own government. Yes, this is what they should. Not blame Japan.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-japan-forcedlabour-southkorea/thousand-koreans-sue-government-over-wartime-labor-at-japan-firms-idUSKCN1OJ0F7

2) Koreans killed Japanese 44 fisher men after WW2

Anyone here who claims labor issue is not over yet or Individuals still hold rights to demand, must explain this issue as well.

After WW2, Koreans under its radical president Rhee admin set a border called "Syngman Rhee Line", and shot Japanese fishing boat there killing 44 people and 3929 were captured, 328 ships were seized. Koreans must pay for this. Nothing was addressed for this crime in Korea.

If Japan must pay for labor, with the same logic Korea must pay for killing Japanese and seized ships.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Been settled previously but the koresn govt at the time pocketed the money and kept agitating the victims, korea will never ever let the matter alone while they can get political points and keep their ill informed people hating on Japan.

Time to ignore them as they are like a disgruntled wife and no matter what remedies were taken she would never think they were good enough and sooner or later she would bring the issue up once again.

Exactly what is going one here with Korea, there is mileage in this grievance as long as they can keep it alive and on going.

Its been settled, time to move on.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Is this thing about or related to elections? If politicians keep on winning when using this issue and similar others like comfort women issue then they will keep on doing this until voters put a stop to it.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

"Survivors of the camps, their families and supporters are still seeking compensation and atonement for the labor and suffering. "

It is no unkown secret that the monies paid to them by Japan was abused by their own government and major corporations. Enough is enough. If they want to cry go to their own government. There are plenty of documents and receipts out there for them to go over as well as tax records, profit shares sheets etc. Follow the money during the time SK was given the money by Japan and look at who was building or mfg then trace the money back to their special programs on development. It's all there.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Another article about Japan,s WW2 legacy of forced labor/sex slaves and the rest...lets sse how many fly-in net uyoku types will get on here today with their 'its been settled, time to move on, they were all volunteers, nobody was forced, J-side is as pure as cherry blossoms stuff.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Come on now folks some more honesty PLEASE!!

Japan while VERY technically, has settled things in 1965. From that point to present the govt does EVERYTHING possible to avoid discussing, acknowledging the TRUTH. And yes there is still an insane amount of denial from the PM on down!!

While Japan & its companies technically did settle things, they have shown almost NO sincerity at all with respect to what it did from 1890 to 1945. NONE!!

Very un-becoming.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

ToshihiroToday  06:58 am JST

I wonder how decades more will Japan's neighboring countries will keep this up? Japan had already apologized while its neighboring countries have refused to accept these apologies, what else do they want?

If you are so interested, why not look into it instead of outright dismissing it even though you don't understand the experience of the Korean perspective (like most here). This is part of the problem!!

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

The AvengerToday  08:16 am JST

There are much bigger social and economic issues to resolve than obtain money (by court order) from Japan. For example, the Korean economy and housing are giant issues affecting thousands of Koreans. Drop this issue and move your country forward. Inflaming hatred from Korea to Japan or Japan to Korea is pointless and will lead to nothing positive. Take a deep breath, and say as a united people, "we choose to move forward and not live in the past, regardless who is at fault

The old, 'a govt can only focus on one thing at a time, so let this go' argument, huh?!

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I would love to see Japan take this dispute to the International Court of Justice and get a final ruling on what the 1965 Treaty between South Korea and Japan actually covered.

Article 2 of the Treaty clearly states

*The High Contracting Parties confirm that the problems concerning property, rights, and interests of the two High Contracting Parties and their peoples (including juridical persons) and the claims between the High Contracting Parties and *between their peoples

So this would clearly include everyone top down from the Japanese government to individuals.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

These victims can't continue asking for financial compensation. That boat sailed already. However, they have every right to continue speaking out about these companies. That's their right no matter how much Japan wants the world to forget their wartime actions and sweep things under the rug. Why should these things be forgotten.

I remember going to Sadogashima where POWs and Japanese political prisoners were forced to work in a mine called Kinsan. There's a museum there now but there's no mention of, no memorial for these people who were forced to work resulting in thousands of deaths.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

The Korean laborers who sued Mitsubishi were not slaves. They were fairly paid workers who signed employment contracts with the Japanese company. Their signed contracts turned up during the trial but the Korean Supreme Court ignored them and decided in favor of the “forced”laborers. It seems to me that many posters are just repeating what they‘ve read or heard through English news media. Never having bothered to learn Japanese, they have no access to original documents or local news reports.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

The Korean laborers who sued Mitsubishi were not slaves. They were fairly paid workers who signed employment contracts with the Japanese company. 

So because they were 'paid' by Mitsubishi, it gives them the right to have treated and abused them like slaves. These people were all over Asia and in Japan as well. What percent were paid? I can imagine what they were paid.....essentially nothing as Japan's resources and $ were being used for the war effort. Mitsubishi is also just one company.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Media just trying to get everyone riled up, opening old wounds. Trying to get people angry and feel entitle to something. People really need to look pass this stuff and focus to the future. Learn from the past.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Korea is just a former vassal state of China, and it's like a degraded copy of China.

We can treat them like we would treat China.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

I'm really fed up from the bottom of my heart with the demandingness and persistentness of Korean. It's almost like a religious activity. Originally they should first demand the compensation to their own government which embezzled the compensation money of 1965 treaty without paying the victims. But well, they also actually have the individual right to demand the compensation. The related companies should compensate them. SIGH.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

@Toshihiro,

It is obvious seeking for MONEY. S k country is out of jobs, out of money, therefore turning to rob JP for money using force labor as an legit excuse. There is no verification who was actually had gotten forced labor..

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Last week images of Hiroshima were broadcast around the world. No one questioned why the Japanese were still banging on about the atomic bombings.

Partly because no one is specifically blaming anyone else for the bombings.

The only aim is to ensure the massacres are not forgotten, peace is maintained and history does not repeat itself by way of allowing anyone to mindlessly engage in similar acts in the future.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

The Korean laborers who sued Mitsubishi were not slaves. They were fairly paid workers who signed employment contracts with the Japanese company. Their signed contracts turned up during the trial but the Korean Supreme Court ignored them

The contracts were not ignored, but considered against the body of evidence. A signed piece of paper means nothing if it is gained under duress - just look at the police in Japan.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Last week images of Hiroshima were broadcast around the world. No one questioned why the Japanese were still banging on about the atomic bombings.

Much unlike Korea, the Japanese A-bomb victims and surviving families have not sought a compensation directly from the US government or private entities once the peace treaty was concluded in 1951. All individual claims (though its rights being recognised) have been handled by their home government.

Just a few days ago a verdict was made at a Japanese district court recognizing people encountering "Black rains" as A-bomb victims. Their medical treatment costs would be covered by the home Japanese government, not by the US.

The Korean labour dispute is unique or deviant largely from the standard procedure for postwar settlements. It is disrespectful of international agreement. I don't even see the plaintiff lawyer serving well their clients. Their strategy is politically driven.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

SB finally back from SK quarantine seems SK people have long life 75 plus 10 or 15 also makes it 85-90 years

1 ( +2 / -1 )

POWs were also forced into working for the IJA. Twelve thousand died building the Thailand- Burma railroad, featured in the film, "Bridge Over the River Kwai." Overall, 50% of British and American prisoners died while in Japanese custody, as opposed to just 2% who died in German custody. POWs also worked in mines, although international treaties forbade forcing prisoners to work in war related industries.

The brutality of the IJA created a lot of resentment. Growing up, I found it hard to understand why so many of the adults hated Japanese, but after talking and reading, it is easier to understand. I know that hatred does not solve problems, but I can understand how hatred would develop.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

I once lived in South Korea, back when educated people still in their 30s or over could speak Japanese and when, ritualistic cursing of Japan aside, there were ambivalent feelings towards the land across the sea. The Japanese were routinely referred to as Ilbon-nom, but then -nom was attached to most all nouns referring to non-Koreans. I taught in a school where the vice-principal was a kindly but lazy man, who had been appointed to his position simply because he had once studied in Japan. That gave him prestige.

“'Both countries need to make concessions and reach a comprise(,” Kim said."

No, Japan-bashing is an ongoing and lucrative enterprise. Historical truth simply doesn't matter, and even many Japanese toe the same politically correct line. Something very similar is going on in America.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

1glennToday  07:08 pm JST

POWs were also forced into working for the IJA. 

And they abused by Korean guards,

"The Korean gonzuku guards were among the worst in the camps"

http://robinrowland.com/garret/2005/08/korean-guards-on-burma-thailand.html

https://apjjf.org/-Aiko-Utsumi/2505/article.html

"A graduate of the Imperial Japanese Army Academy, Hong was placed in command of the Japanese camps holding Allied (primarily U.S. and Filipino) prisoners of war in the Philippines during the latter part of World War II, where many of the camp guards were of Korean ethnicity. Hong was held responsible for all the atrocities committed by Imperial Japanese Army prison guards against allied POWs, and was hanged in 1946.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hong_Sa-ik

https://military.wikia.org/wiki/Hong_Sa-ik

One can not objectively address IJA war crimes against Allied POWS without including the role of many Koreans, up to 240,000 who served in the Japanese military.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

In 1945 my father a Normandy veteran believed, judging by stories he had heard that the Japanese were the cruelest people in the world. In the nineties and earlier this century he started to have another opinion but more recently thinks his original opinion was correct.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

JAPAN must stop such action. It's unforgettable , unforgivable and very bad examples for their young generation.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Is there a mute button for South Korea? No? Damn!

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Out of all the Asians countries. S. Korea is the only country to receive compensation multiple times, apologies multiple times while other Asian countries have moved on. China who suffered the most with Nanking massacre and Unit 731 is moving on.

S. Korean government has never paid this victims after receiving the money. How come you anti-Japan trolls never talk about that part? You never judge S. Korean government for their mistakes, for not paying after receiving the money from the Japanese government multiple times. Hypocrites as always.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

First they extorted money from the Japanese government and never paid the victims 1965.

Then the Japanese people in 1993 offered money again from the Japanese citizens themselves.

2015 then again Japanese government paid for comfort women because the Korean argue is not covered under 1965 aggrement.

Now they want money from individual Japanese companies like Mitsubishi, Nippon Steel.

The Korean argument is you Japan should allow your companies to be sold off and pay for the third time. Pay again, extortion again. Don't get involved, it's Mitsubishi we are after!.... For now.

They will hate us even more if we allow them to do this. They will want more money 10 years from now. The same way paying before, giving apologies before fixed nothing, Did nothing... It Makes Things Even Worse By Not Standing Up To Half of Korea.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

It only haunts Japan due to failure to reconcile and face history. This can be reconciled and it can be faced down but not if you can't face up to it.

Starts with those statues in Korea, and appreciating where that comes from, and the magnitude of the pain caused. That can never be wished away.

Face it head on. See it, understand why it's bad. Acknowledge that this was bad, wrong, and should never be repeated. Say it. Write it. Put it in law that it cannot be denied just like laws in Germany have done.

Don't be the same government that made Japan an arms dealer in 2014 on one side of your mouth then mourn loss of life from the bombs in another.

You have to show change not endless hypocrisy and tone deafness

And since that won't happen

We'll repeat this next year! And every year

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

@Ilovecoffee

I still remember couple of years ago when some English politician said something along the lines of "British Empire has never done anything wrong". I can't remember the exact words, but it was something along those lines. It's not just one politician either, the average person in England knows absolutely nothing (accurate) about what their country did in the past. The general sentiment is that "Yeah, we [[might have done]] some bad stuff, but we also did a lot good, so no need to focus on the bad". Sounds familiar? Exactly what you would hear from the average Japanese.

The ‘average person’ in the UK lives in a multicultural nation which is full of minorities which are a legacy of the UK’s colonial past. Anyone not recognising that is either living in the Outer Hebrides or cut off from the mass media.

What politicians spout and the average man thinks and does is completely different and not a fair comparison in the slightest.

Empire is a historical memory and not a reality.

The majority of Brits are well aware of that!

We are in 2020 not 1820.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Ilovecoffee

I still remember couple of years ago when some English politician said something along the lines of "British Empire has never done anything wrong". I can't remember the exact words, but it was something along those lines. It's not just one politician either, the average person in England knows absolutely nothing (accurate) about what their country did in the past. The general sentiment is that "Yeah, we [[might have done]] some bad stuff, but we also did a lot good, so no need to focus on the bad". Sounds familiar? Exactly what you would hear from the average Japanese.

Actually I've never seen Japanese TV documentaries broadcasting Vietnam war, Khmer Rouge, Rwandan genocide and other post-WW2 atrocities referring to and comparing with the ones done by the Imperial Japan while Japanese TVs like to refer to and compare with Nazis Germany, Soviet and CCP when they broadcast those post-WW2 atrocities. And there are many animations based on an episode from A-bombing of Hiroshima and carpet bombing of Tokyo but there are NO animations from the point of view of China, SE Asian countries and other which were devastated by Imperial Japan.

After all most of Japanese are not good at objectifying themselves and are unconscious to be self-righteous mainly due to the self-contained isolated geographical condition that is furthermost to the right of Eurasian continent and separated by an ocean. It's just like an ignorant self-righteous mom who has been only a full-time housewife for decades and are not aware of herself to be ignorant and self-righteous.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Anyone who thinks that the Japanese have changed is mistaken!

There are Japanese companies in Myanmar supporting the military regime that tortures and kills its own popular from babies up....

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

‘Its own population’

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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