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New stimulus package to include wage hikes for care workers, nurses

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Don’t be afraid to put all the stimmy into crypto!

Bitcoin and Ethereum should be a safe 2-3x this December all the way to January.

Altcoins could go 10x minimum or zero if you don’t time it right to cash out on time.

-17 ( +2 / -19 )

Good for them, they are all deserving of wage hikes. Hopefully the gov't raises wages in other industries.

Cue all the outraged stating "the government has no business setting wages", "it's socialist!" and similar.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

The monthly salaries of such workers, whose pay is regulated and said to be insufficient compared with other industries, will be raised by 3 percent, or 9,000 yen, in February, according to the sources.

This is how much these " essential workers" are worth, after all the horrors of COVID wards and high suicide rates. In the meantime, the government is shoveling cash for hotel owners with GoTo, has some generous pork for Dentsu under the guise of "digitization", and Kishida is already off on his maiden voyage to spread Japanese economic stimulus around the world.

All is right with the world.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Nice try, but what effectively more to buy with it, regarding inflation, lack of product innovation and further disrupted supply chains, if they all ever manage to get out of those facilities and tired from extra hours for some free minutes. Putting it into volatile coin accounts or ‘saving’ at negative interest rates, burn it at the gas station? Let’s face it, that moderate wage hike is in most cases something on paper, cosmetics, propaganda.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Raise the minimum wage for part time workers, and reduce the pay and perks of all diet members.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

3% for nurses, but 5% or even 7% for the care workers since they are much more underpaid, this will bring quality people to this section.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

 But care workers and children's nurses earned 293,000 yen and 303,000 yen, respectively, on average per month.

This information is screwed up BIG TIME! The salary average is skewed by the number of these workers in Tokyo!

No "day care" worker down here in Okinawa is averaging 293,000 per month, hell they would be lucky to be bringing home HALF of that, and no bonuses either!

Oh and good luck finding a job as a day care worker here that is "seishain" too!

11 ( +11 / -0 )

It’s pathetic!

The proposed raise won’t even bring nurses into the average wage bracket-unconscionable!

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Wage hikes are not usually considered "stimulus" unless they are temporary. I assume the govt wont be lowering these wages at any point in the near future.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Great, so students get a free handout to go get drunk in shibuya, but no help for low paid workers?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Japan's new stimulus package with fiscal spending expected to exceed 30 trillion yen will include wage hikes for care workers, nursery school staff and nurses, government sources said Thursday.

The monthly salaries of such workers, whose pay is regulated and said to be insufficient compared with other industries, will be raised by 3 percent, or 9,000 yen, in February, according to the sources.

Wait a sec, wasn't this discussed, like, a year ago or so when health care workers who got tossed under the COVID-train following an ill-timed GO TO-campaign resulting in a second (and later third) wave were leaving their jobs in significant numbers?

So, for one year, did two governments hold meetings, discussions, debate to end up providing...peanuts...in the future...I call this add insult to injury. Well, that's LDP-economics for ya!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

3% wage hike? Are they missing a zero? The labor shortage in healthcare will just get worse.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Yubaru is right, the wages stated for a nursery worker are for a "seiki" full employee. Most people working in a daycare are "hiseiki" employees on short contracts and paid something like 150,000 a month for very long hours.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The government's regulation of hospital and care facility charges makes wage increases difficult, even if there is a labor shortage.

One would think that for all the bashing of “neo-liberalism”, that such regulations would have been abolished nigh on 40 years ago. Nope. Neo-liberalism never arrived in Japan in the first place. As Ishin’s Matsui-san has been pointing out, Japan’s systems are still as they were back in the Showa era.

Deregulate, and let free market price signals do what they do far better the central planning ever has, anywhere.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Are they going to tax the rich to pay for it or the working class via inflation?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

if they hiked wages every time they hiked prices and taxes, the economy would be in much better shape

5 ( +6 / -1 )

In Japan, the average monthly income, including bonuses, was 352,000 yen in 2020. But care workers and children's nurses earned 293,000 yen and 303,000 yen, respectively, on average per month.

There should also be hazard pay and other compensation during states of emergency and other periods of extraordinary risk and workload

4 ( +4 / -0 )

This information is screwed up BIG TIME! The salary average is skewed by the number of these workers in Tokyo!

No "day care" worker down here in Okinawa is averaging 293,000 per month, hell they would be lucky to be bringing home HALF of that, and no bonuses either!

Oh and good luck finding a job as a day care worker here that is "seishain" too!

Even the Seishain don't make 293,000 a month, even if you made 400,000 a month before tax , pension alone will take a big chunk out of the 400,000.

I stopped believing a long long time ago in the numbers provided by bureaucrats.

To tell the truth, the average salary of a typical Japanese employee, regardless of their profession, needs to be doubled to make him live a decent life. With their current salaries they just can't rid of onigiris and cup ramen as their typical lunch.

That is what the gov't with the help of those heading the clueless media don't want the average Japanese know and those that have been opportuned to live abroad realize the reality that the standard of living is not commensurate with the economic status or ranking of the country.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

But care workers and children's nurses earned 293,000 yen and 303,000 yen, respectively, on average per month.

I remember watching almost every day and talking to the my daughters' nursery school teachers. They were basically bringing in between 150,000 to 200,000 yen per month in wages.

I always thought, and still do, think those who put in so much effort and patience in taking such good care of our children should be paid much, much more.

I was making so much more for doing so much less. The clowns driving their high-end cars to the city office were making double or more than the nursery school teachers and were doing hell of a lot less and lots of unimportant paper pushing and god knows what.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Kishida said in a press conference after being re-elected prime minister by parliament on Wednesday that the government will provide handouts of 100,000 yen to students facing financial difficulties to help them pay tuition fees.

From my understanding, tuition is reasonable here compared to say the US, but is 100,000 yen enough to help with tuition?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Deregulate, and let free market price signals do what they do far better the central planning ever has, anywhere.

And end up with extortionate American health care costs and all nurses being SE Asian immigrants being paid much less. And abused more

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Not anywhere. We would end up with a healthcare system like in America 

Anerica’s healthcare system is not a free market one, either. There are third party payers in between the consumers and service providers.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Anerica’s healthcare system is not a free market one, either. There are third party payers in between the consumers and service providers.

HMOs funded by private equity attracted by the high profit opportunities. The free market in health care in action.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

A whopping ¥9,000 monthly pay increase for nurses. It wouldn’t even cover the sewerage bill. Put another zero on it and make it worthwhile receiving.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

This is just the 'carrot' before they bring out the 'stick' of mandating vaxx shots for care workers and nurses.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Go to hello work or indeed website and see by yourself how much they offer to nurse/care staff, most offers are between 150-220万円.

Wave of old people is coming we will sew the peak in next 30 years. So it will get worse before it will get better.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

HMOs funded by private equity attracted by the high profit opportunities. The free market in health care in action.

In a “free market”, consumers have free choice about how their money is spent on the goods/services, and can take their business elsewhere to an alternative of their choice, if dissatisfied with the value for money they perceive.

I am not American and haven’t visited there, but understand that this situation is not the case in the US health system with its third party payers.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

This is just the 'carrot' before they bring out the 'stick' of mandating vaxx shots for care workers and nurses

That should be in place, regardless of whether there is a wage increase or not.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

A new stimulus package to force employer's to pay more.

Just in time for Christmas.

And a partridge in a pear tree.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Kishida said in a press conference after being re-elected prime minister by parliament on Wednesday that the government will provide handouts of 100,000 yen to students facing financial difficulties to help them pay tuition fees.

This may not even go through, and they shouldn't count on it. There is a system already in place for students who need assistance, only problem is they have to keep up attendance and good grades, for the tax money, which covers ALL tuition!

Next there will be push back from people who are NOT students, and need help too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This should include Teachers as well.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

 But care workers and children's nurses earned 293,000 yen and 303,000 yen, respectively, on average per month.

This information is screwed up BIG TIME! The salary average is skewed by the number of these workers in Tokyo!

I very much doubt the average worker in Tokyo is making anywhere near that Yubaru. It is skewed by the bureaucrats and civil servants as well as top executives who make obscenely high salaries while the rest of the people here get scraps.

The gap has certainly widened between rich and poor in the last 20 years and is only getting worse.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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