politics

Japan, China to resume fleet visits for 1st time since 2011

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Good progress. Military relationship between the two neighbours are weaker than other relationships, and efforts are needed to improve.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

talking is better than fighting.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

China is involved in a number of trade and military disputes with the United States and it "has (always) improved relations with Japan whenever ties with the United States have worsened," a Chinese political scientist said.

So China and Japan resume fleet visits for the first time in years, but at the same time they're still in dispute over the Senkakus. From the Chinese side, the rapprochement is partly driven because China and the US are increasingly at loggerheads, but from the Japanese side the US is also Japan's major defence ally. Meanwhile China remains the major backer of the DPRK, which spits venom at Japan any chance it gets.

This news has got to be progress, but geez it's complicated in the region right now.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I wonder if there'll be issues about certain types of flags being flown...

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Nothing new. China only need us when their relationship worsen with other nations. Once things cool down,they would once again reverse back to their previous attitude. Is been happening for several decades now. Relationship with never improve.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Japan should stick to the pacific and China should stick to the China sea. We win because the pacific is massive.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

@Hiro

Relations with China turned sour because of Ishihara's idiotic and highly provocative proposal to buy the Senkaku's and make them part of Tokyo in 2012. This was followed by Japanese nationalization of the islands. China also claims the islands and Japan refuses to take the matter the international court of justice, evidently afraid it may lose.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Is China's first "super carrier" still stuck in Ningbo Bay?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Japanese people are so naive. I cant believe Japan keep relations with a country that wants to invade its borders.

While abe is visiting Beijing Chinese warships are on Japanese EEZ.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Nothing new. China only need us when their relationship worsen with other nations. Once things cool down,they would once again reverse back to their previous attitude. Is been happening for several decades now. Relationship with never improve.

I agree. China is always like this.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Not happy about this. Relations between Japan and Communist PRC will never be good, until PRC starts following "rules based law", stops building fake islands and becomes genuinely Peace loving like Japan. PRC is desperate for Japan trade, as Trump is winning the trade wars and sending Chinese economy backwards.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@happyhere

The Senkaku Islands were already in Japanese territory long before Ishihara's proposal in 2012. Only at that time, these islands were privately owned.The nationalization you speak of was only the purchase of the government of these islands from their owners. A commercial transaction within Japanese territory.

What happens is that Chinese propaganda has changed the version to say something it is not. Because the Senkaku Islands are recognized in the UN as Japanese territory. And that is why China has not appealed to the International Court of Justice. Because they would lose that trial. As happened this month with Bolivia and Chile.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Japan refuses to take the matter the international court of justice, evidently afraid it may lose

A court case would be pointless because the Chinese dictatorship does not comply with the rulings of the ICJ: see their response to their loss of the court case to the Philippines for one example.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

happyhereOct. 22  10:44 am JST

Relations with China turned sour because of Ishihara's idiotic and highly provocative proposal to buy the Senkaku's and make them part of Tokyo in 2012. This was followed by Japanese nationalization of the islands. China also claims the islands and Japan refuses to take the matter the international court of justice, evidently afraid it may lose.

Time to correct CCP propaganda. Ishihara's proposal to buy the islands, as well as the J-govt buying them are not provocative at all because the two islands that were "nationalized" were already owned by Japanese citizens. In fact one of the islands was already owned by the J-govt. China simply used this as an excuse to take an aggressive position against Japan.

Since Japanese control of the Senkakus is globally recognized, it is up to China to bring their claim to the ICJ. But China refuses to do so since it would open itself up to international jurisdiction of it's territorial claims. And many other nations would then take China to the ICJ over other disputed territories. Furthermore, China has shown that is does not abide by the rule of law by refusing to recognize the ruling over Scarborough Shoal and the utterly ridiculous 9-dash line.

Finally, China has completely lost the game as regards the Senkakus, as the United States has repeatedly made it clear that they would defend them from any foreign invasion.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@OssanAmerica

Japanese administration of the islands is recognized internationally, but not its sovereignty over the islands. There is a big difference, please look up the meaning of these words. If Japan wants international acceptance of its sovereignty it should go to the ICJ and get it confirmed. Whether China accepts the ICJ ruling or not is irrelevant, Japan would have won the case. The US only very reluctantly and recently agreed to defend the Senkaku islands. They have never recognized Japanese sovereignty over them, at least not publicly.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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