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Japan eyes U.S. job, investment plan ahead of Abe-Trump summit

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By Takashi Umekawa and Linda Sieg

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Cripes...do everyone a favor and take care of your own first! Japan has enough problems on it's own without having to kowtow to Trump.

This comes about because Abe knows Japan's practices have been unbalanced in the past and is trying to come up with ways to cover his arse.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

"o-miyage" (souvenirs)?! Trump will not be satisfied even if Abe takes One Full Container of it (!)

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Abe off to protect the golden goose car industry. Kissing serious Trump rear end. 22% of Japan's exports go to the US while Japan only accepts a fraction of that from the US. Even if not cars, Japan needs to increase their imports of American food or other items quickly.

Things are about to get fair!

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Quick! Look busy! The boss is coming

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Japan needs to increase their imports of American food or other items quickly.

Here is part of the problem. At least with higher ticket items, like cars and parts, it would be relatively easy to increase the imports, but it would be problematic, as the costs associated with driving a foreign car here in Japan would severely limit the sales and the balance would still tip in Japan's favor. Why import, or export an item if you already know it won't sell.

Food items? That causes an even bigger headache, as to balance out the monetary value between a car and an apple, Japan would have to import and sell, a hell of a lot of apples to equal or balance the trade imbalance. And again no guarantee that those apples would sell on the market here anyway, at least not in the volume needed to balance out the trade. EVERYONE here knows Japanese apples are so much better anyway, so why purchase a foreign one! (Tongue in cheek sarcasm)

Not to mention the backlash that Abe would get from the agriculture industry (JA) for putting pressure on them by limiting or undercutting their producers with cheaper imports.

Increasing the imports of foodstuffs is one thing, but it's not going to be enough to balance the trade.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

They'll obviously just be passing around bags of money

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Speaking as an American, I hope Abe and other world leaders take a firm stand against the Trump administration, and particularly the alt-right, de facto president Bannon, the evil genius behind the curtain. When Trump visits countries in Europe, there are bound to be massive protests, I hope the citizens of Japan do the same.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

EVERYONE here knows Japanese apples are so much better anyway, so why purchase a foreign one! (Tongue in cheek sarcasm)

I'm not particularly keen on the 'superior' Japanese apple, which is typically too sweet and not tart enough. (Recently some more tart varieties have become available, so things can change.) Many years ago there was a big fuss when some rule was changed and American apples appeared in the supermarkets, red ones and yellow ones (I forget the actual variety names - one may have been Golden Delicious). Looking for a better apple, I bought them on several occasions, and each time was disappointed. Every apple tasted like it was from last year's crop. Either they had not been stored properly during transport, or the American farmers were taking the opportunity to offload their unwanted surplus. In that instance, Japanese apples, even the sweet ones, were much better. No need for sarcasm.

There is a parallel with the question of car imports, though; it seems America just wants to ship out whatever it has to hand (steering wheel on the wrong side, way too big, gas-guzzlers) without studying the market or producing what will sell in that market. And then complaining that the target market has it in for them and is biased against them.

buying dollar-denominated “infrastructure bonds”, a proposal that has been floated as a way Japan could take part in Trump’s promised upgrade of U.S. infrastructure.

America first - let America upgrade American infrastructure. Japan's infrastructure - roads, bridges, water/gas pipes etc - built in the post-war era is well overdue for an upgrade. Will Trump be reciprocating by buying any yen-dominated infrastructure bonds to help the upgrade of Japan's aging infrastructure?

Thought not.

Japan first!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Should say: Japan eyes Japan jobs, investment plan ahead of Trump-Abe summit. Japan has no clue of what Trump will do. because the true agenda is hidden behind advanced English, and on a triple sec level...its all over youtube.com that HERE-LAND's economic power is headed to oblivion within Trumps official time frame.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

OK, so how much is the US going to invest in Japan? How many jobs are US industries going to create in Japan?

When is the US going to lift tariffs on cars and trucks?

When is the US going to stop insisting under threat of war that all petroleum products must be purchased using $US?

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Abe, who is close to JR Tokai Chairman emeritus Yoshiyuki Kasai, has touted maglev or magnetic levitation as a “dream technology” that could link New York and Washington in under an hour.

Fantasy nonsense. The Maglev is an epic boondoggle, a $50 billion sinkhole that will never show a profit. That the LDP are attempting to fob off Trump with this platinum turkey is farcical and shows how bereft of serious ideas they are.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Are they going to play golf during their meeting at Trump's Palm Beach estate? That, to me, is the most interesting question.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What a panic the Japanese are in over Trump's ultimatum-the easy ride is over for Japan Inc.....

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Ah, the "Japan that could say 'no'"... haha. Desperation has set in.

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There is a parallel with the question of car imports, though; it seems America just wants to ship out whatever it has to hand (steering wheel on the wrong side, way too big, gas-guzzlers) without studying the market or producing what will sell in that market.

Sigh... America makes a wide range of compact cars, and they are available with right hand drive, as they are sold in the British and Australian markets, have have been since what, the 1950's? The Ford Fiesta was the world's number one selling compact car for years. It was small, used little gas, and was available in right hand drive. The Fiesta was replaced by the Escort, and then the Focus. These were top-selling cars in every continent in the world, but not Japan. The Ford Combi van is a right hand drive multi-use vehicle which has been a top seller in Europe for generations, but I have never seen one in Japan.

In the past, America has indeed tried to design cars for the Japanese market, but gave up. Between Japan's keeping the yen weak (and pricing imported cars out of the market), and Japan's keiretsu systems, which place priority on Japanese goods, and the prohibition against the domestic sellers of Japanese cars to sell American cars within the same dealership, America cars (and other goods) simply do not sell.

OK, so how much is the US going to invest in Japan? How many jobs are US industries going to create in Japan?

Every single large company in Japan owes it's existence primarily to America. All of the manufacturing jobs which exist in Japan today evolve from Japan's trade with America in the 50's and 60's. It was America which got Japan on it's feet after the war, which abolished tariffs on things like cameras, personal electronics, and other goods in order to help Japan's economy grow.

America was Japan's top trading partner for decades, and Japan would not be what it is today without America. No other country in the world has been as close or as helpful to Japan and Japan's growth than America. I am a Japanese exporter, and when I sell goods to America, my buyers pay no taxes or tariffs whatsoever. In Europe they have to pay anywhere from 17% to 35%, while in other countries, tariffs are levied at 60% and higher. Without America charging zero tariffs or placing barriers to most Japanese goods, Japan would not be what it is today. Please think a little before you post.

Abe is in a tough place because no on can argue that America has not been very fair with Japan and Japanese goods, and no on can argue that Japan has not been the same with America and American products. This one-sided trading practice has kept American cars, trucks, food, and other goods out of Japan, while allowing Japanese goods to flood into America. In the event of a trade conflict, America has nothing to lose, because the loss of what few American goods get to Japan would go unnoticed by American companies. On the other hand, a tariff on Japanese cars, electronics, and other goods would bankrupt Japan in short order. Japan is already in a tough spot economically.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

The USA is the most powerful country - and has the highest GDP - in the world. Why would Japan have any responsibility at all to help create more jobs in the USA? Although former colonial powers have responsibility (in some cases) to help create jobs in their former colonies, and although rich countries have some responsibility to help create jobs (or to otherwise help people) in poor countries, Japan has no responsibility to do anything at all specifically designed to create jobs in the mighty USA. After all, is it not the USA that currently occupies Japan? And does Japan not already buy plenty of military equipment, commercial aircraft, and pharmaceutical and other medical products from the USA?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Regardless of what Trump does, as far as the car industry is concerned, it will ultimately be American jobs for American robots.

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When the PM got back into the PM office in 2009, it was "Japan is back!" Now, it's "Japan is back...to pucker up!"

3 ( +3 / -0 )

When the PM got back into the PM office in 2009, it was "Japan is back!" Now, it's "Japan is back...to pucker up!"

It is interesting how similar Trump is to the Japanese establishment isn't it? Even his slogan of Make America Great Again is similar to Abe's 2012 slogan of Bring Japan Back.

The Japanese establishment has been protecionist and racist, and now they are staring at their american mirror image in the form of Donald Trump. There are talks now of Abe finally implementing the structural reforms so desperately needed as a defense against Trump's protectionism and the refugee controversy in the US has forced the Japanese to look, albeit not closely, at their closed door policy regarding refugees. All in all, the chickens have come home to roost for Japan. I hate to say this, but while Trump may be the worst thing to happen ever for the world, he may just end up being the bitter medicine that Japan needs to really reform.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Yes, correction - 2012, not 2009. Oops!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

When is the US going to stop insisting under threat of war that all petroleum products must be purchased using $US?

the magic chequebook of oil sales in US Dollars is probably the only thing keeping the shell of a country afloat. Talk about currency manipulation...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Haha, Abe is terrified. And so he should be.

Japan is in serious trouble internally, and now America has a leader who is taking a hard line with them too. It is beautiful to watch. The petulant child is getting put in its' place.

And think about this for a second...

Apple, the American giant, has enough cash (not overall value... just CASH!) to buy Toyota and Mitsubishi UFJ outright.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

The Fiesta was replaced by the Escort, and then the Focus. These were top-selling cars in every continent in the world, but not Japan. The Ford Combi van is a right hand drive multi-use vehicle which has been a top seller in Europe for generations, but I have never seen one in Japan.

The costs associated with "shaken" prevent the average car owner from purchasing these vehicles, not to mention the taxes as well.

These cars, while compact, do not or would not have the "yellow" number plate, (660CC or lower) and would be more expensive, and less attractive to owners

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@performmonk Regardless of what Trump does, as far as the car industry is concerned, it will ultimately be American jobs for American robots

I agree, but how many of the robots will be made by a US company? I'm pretty sure Japan, Germany and a couple other countries are ahead of the US in manufacturing robots. Does anyone know where the robots used in manufacturing US cars are made?

Too bad Trump and the Republicans want to support 1950s industries, but then these industries are their biggest campaign contributors. Going backwards, supporting dinosaur industries, will benefit the US's competitors who are moving forward and recognize times have changed. Trump is over 70, a man living in the past.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The costs associated with "shaken" prevent the average car owner from purchasing these vehicles

I don't understand this. Are the shaken rules for American cars different from the rules for Japanese or European cars? The shaken is there to (theoretically) ensure that every car on the road is roadworthy. How is that a deterrent specifically to the purchase of cars from any particular country?

Sigh... America makes a wide range of compact cars, and they are available with right hand drive.....a top seller in Europe for generations, but I have never seen one in Japan

In the past, America has indeed tried to design cars for the Japanese market, but gave up.

You mean they don't make the effort, and still complain that Japan has got it in for them. I have never seen an American car advertised in Japan. If you don't let people know what you have, you don't stimulate the desire to buy. The image of American cars in Japan is big, expensive, steering wheel on the wrong side. If you have cars to sell that don't fit that description- that are every bit as good as the Japanese and European cars - then you need to get your message out. Advertise.

And 'Japan prices imported cars out of the market' really isn't a valid excuse when European cars sell so much better than American cars in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is the forth arrow, give our jobs and money to USA. God only knows what the one after is?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

However foreign car makers problems, difficulties all stem from issues once the cars are here. Way back when the US was smashing cars they did kinda try to enter Japan but no locals were interested in getting into business with the yanks, distributors/truckers weren't interested in hauling them around, auto parts companies wouldn't stock parts, etc etc etc etc

Above is what I wrote on another thread. While even back in the 80s IF the Japan market was open to foreign vehicles(its still NOT) I doubt the likes of Ford, GM etc would have done too well, maybe ok for a few models, but as others above have correctly put it the non-tariff barriers have kept the auto & many other markets at bay OUT of Japan for many many decades.

Now while Japan is in decline for many industries its not worth the bother except for a few cherry picked bits here & there that might be worthwhile

I too don't like trump but it is a bit fun to watch him make Japan Inc shake in their boots, they have had their way for far too many decades, but even Japan Inc has seen the writing on the walls and many companies invest a LOT more outside Japan than in the past & that is unlikely to change

See below as to why US makers never really had a chance in Japan, sangetsu3 pretty much nails it:

In the past, America has indeed tried to design cars for the Japanese market, but gave up. Between Japan's keeping the yen weak (and pricing imported cars out of the market), and Japan's keiretsu systems, which place priority on Japanese goods, and the prohibition against the domestic sellers of Japanese cars to sell American cars within the same dealership, America cars (and other goods) simply do not sell.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

don't understand this. Are the shaken rules for American cars different from the rules for Japanese or European cars? The shaken is there to (theoretically) ensure that every car on the road is roadworthy. How is that a deterrent specifically to the purchase of cars from any particular country?

The rules are basically the same, however, certified mechanics would be required, as well as there being a need for parts that may be required, if necessary, to pass the inspection. American vehicle parts are not commonly found here and would need to be imported.

Those would increase the overall cost of the inspection.

Also, the cars imported here, would need to be metric as well, if they came from the states.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

In the past, America has indeed tried to design cars for the Japanese market, but gave up. Between Japan's keeping the yen weak (and pricing imported cars out of the market), and Japan's keiretsu systems, which place priority on Japanese goods, and the prohibition against the domestic sellers of Japanese cars to sell American cars within the same dealership

All the excuses in the world still don't explain why Japanese roads are filled with Mercedes, Volvos and BMWs. Unless one can explain that, the charge that Japan is blocking US car sales sounds like a weak excuse.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I don't really see Trump punitively punishing Japanese Auto companies, they have more production in the US than any other foreign auto-selling nation. The infrastructure bonds put forward are a great idea and that would definitely calm Trump down for the remainder of his term

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Abe's duty is to make sure that Japan benefits or on a 50 and 50 basis with it's trading partners. Abe duty is to make sure the Japanese people livelihood gets better NOT answering to trump and finding jobs for americans when his Japanese people are on welfare.

JAPANESE are not slaves of America or any white racists. what is abe thinking, maybe it is time, he take a rest and Japan have a new prime-minister.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

commanteer,

Mercedes, BMW etc are a niche market here, the cherry picked bits I mentioned, these makers also have beefs with things in Japan as well

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japan can invest in factories in the USA with most being run by robots and not humans.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

certified mechanics would be required, as well as there being a need for parts that may be required, if necessary, to pass the inspection. American vehicle parts are not commonly found here and would need to be imported.

My immediate reaction on reading this was ....Duh!

There are already certified mechanics carrying out shaken on a daily basis. No need for anything extra, unless there's something 'special' about American cars that yer average mechanic can't fathom...?

Why are the parts not available? Surely that's the fault of the importers who are not doing their job properly if they think it's OK to sell off stuff that is guaranteed to need replacements for normal wear and tear...without making the necessary parts available. Would Epson sell any printers if it was known replacement ink cartridges were as rare as hen's teeth?

the cars imported here, would need to be metric as well, if they came from the states.

Another Duh. Not because they come from the States, but because they come to Japan which like most of the rest of the modern world, works on the metric system. Any complaint about the metric system is a US home goal - you're the ones out of step, not the rest of the world.

Last week I bought a new crockpot through Amazon Japan. It's an import from the US. It arrived in its original box, with all its original paperwork, instructions, recipe book, etc. - all in English and only English. No problem for me (apart from having to work out how many grams of carrot in a cup), but your average Japanese consumer isn't going to want to buy a product that the manufacturer apparently has so little interest in selling he makes no concessions at all to the target market.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Abe's duty is to make sure that Japan benefits or on a 50 and 50 basis with it's trading partners. Abe duty is to make sure the Japanese people livelihood gets better NOT answering to trump and finding jobs for americans when his Japanese people are on welfare. JAPANESE are not slaves of America or any white racists. what is abe thinking, maybe it is time, he take a rest and Japan have a new prime-minister.

True, very true, and it's Trumps to do the same for the US. However the balance has been in Japan's favor for all too long, and Abe is afraid of the consequences.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

When is the US going to stop insisting under threat of war that all petroleum products must be purchased using $US? because the petro $ is the only thing that keeps the US $ legitimate, without it theyd be fudged. Which is why they're prepared to go to war over it.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

All the excuses in the world still don't explain why Japanese roads are filled with Mercedes, Volvos and BMWs.

OK, in the late '70s Detroit was producing junk. This trend continued through the 80's along with some of the ugliest inbred, incestous designs ever to grace the roads. The hip, really rich, movie stars and upcoming Yuppies started driving European cars as a status symbol. Japan, always trend conscious, moved to these cars. The US car sales plummeted and the import companies either went bust or got out. They never come back because the American luxury car never regained popularity. The American cars you see here now are the over top models, like Caddy's SUV and other extremely high end models, Japan did have tariffs on import automobiles back then, 20% comes to mind. Factor in American cars along with all the required test equipment is inch standard and the support structure investment is staggering.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Another point: US consumers in the US increasingly prefer to buy Japanese cars over domestic brands. If US car companies have trouble selling over imports even in their home market, how much of a welcome can they expect from Japanese consumers?

I have no dog in this race, but US car makers have not been all that impressive for many years. Maybe they should up their game and their efforts, and actually engage in selling to new customers, instead of always asking Washington DC to force people to buy their cars.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A lot of points made in this discussion seem nonsense:

Metric. Really? If America wants to sell cars anywhere other than America, they must be metric. This is a non-issue.

Parts – nonsense these days. Parts are stocked at the dealership that sells US cars. It costs no more for shaken, or the parts, than it does for an equivalent domestic car

Domestic/imports in same dealership. So what – it does not stop Volvo, BMW, MB, etc. European cars outsell US cars 10 to 1 in Japan. Imports are about 10% of new car sales, less than 1% for US cars.

I own a US car in Tokyo. The single biggest problem – lack of dealerships. Who wants to drive an hour or more through traffic to get a warranty oil change. Ford dealers in the Tokyo area last year = 3. That’s all. European car dealerships outnumber US ones more than 10 to 1 in Tokyo area – and there are plenty out in the boondocks too.

When I bought my current car, I considered a Ford – took a half day to go to their lot and see what they had. (driving past scores of domestic dealerships and more than a dozen European ones on the way). Five models – and the one I liked – left steering only. OK with that? – need to take it in black or white – the only colors on the lot, and that is all they will sell you. You can get dealer option but no maker options – just what they have.

I went with a Chrysler, because I liked the car and it suited my needs better than an equivalent domestic model, and was around the same cost. Right hand drive (all models at dealer) – all colors and options available – just need to wait more than a month for delivery (and it is exactly the same with domestic cars if you want a custom set up). I just have to live with the inconvenience of the dealer being 45 min away.

No advertising, no investment in dealerships, no flexibility, no imagination – no effort. This is why they don’t sell cars here. And there is zero import tax on cars in Japan.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Metric. Really? If America wants to sell cars anywhere other than America, they must be metric. This is a non-issue.

Sure... as long as you don't ever, ever, ever have to have any maintenance done at a place other than that MOPAR garage you were complaining that was 45 minutes away.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Metric. Really? If America wants to sell cars anywhere other than America, they must be metric. This is a non-issue.

Just because you say it's a non-issue does not just make it so. The is an issue for the manufacturers and I agree, IF the US makers want to get in here they have to adapt, but they wont because there isnt enough profit for them.

IF the US makers want to sell cars here they have to adjust to the market HERE. I brought up those points, as they are very real and have happened here in the past, and US makers in previous attempts to build dealerships here and sell automobiles found themselves out of the Japanese market BECAUSE they were, and in many ways still are, willing to adapt to the Japanese market.

No advertising, no investment in dealerships, no flexibility, no imagination – no effort. This is why they don’t sell cars here. And there is zero import tax on cars in Japan.

Of course they are not going to invest in a market that sells something like 250,000 vehicles per year, for all makes and models.

The US makers made a half-arsed effort to come here decades ago, and left with their tails between their legs because they were not willing to adapt to the markets needs here.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Interesting reading the article and comments:

@PTownsend - As for robotics in auto plants, Fanuc and Kawasaki Heavy Industries is the most prevalent I have seen. This includes U.S., Japanese, and Korean care manufacturers. A couple of years ago I did work for KIA (Hyundai) for a new plant in Georgia and nearly all robots were Kawasaki.

As for metrics? Wow! I remember the days in the early 70's where we tried in the U.S. I think it was a mistake and short sighted not to go metric at that time. There are still some road signs in the U.S. in km (not many) and mostly north near the Canadian border. I have been in Japan 2 decades and I prefer metrics....although I have to work in both units.

I think historically the U.S. has had by far the dominant consumer market in the world and became complacent about making changes to accommodate exports. I think this probably was one reason the change to metrics was stalled. US GDP is 19 Trillion, China is 11 Trillion and after that Japan, UK, Germany and a few others.

@wtfjapan - actually some petroleum transactions are taking place with USD. China started to sell oil in Yuan in 2012. This is something Putin and China are striving for. The U.S.D. is still the world's reserve currency and probably will stay so for a while (I am not saying it is good or bad). If the U.S. loses reserve currency status it will really have huge ripples on the global economy....some say this is part of the end game to bring in a one world currency and global tax. Who knows?

S&$t is going to get more and more interesting but I think the system will slow down the pace of things.

In the end Abe is taking the right approach with Trump I think. Go over, talk, gather information and also show how much Japan actually contributes to the U.S. economy (heck, 1/2 of the Boeing Dreamliner is made in Japan...including all of the fuselage and wings). I am not a huge Abe supporter and share some views of other posters here but he is a much more experienced politician and has more experience on the global stage than Trump.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sure... as long as you don't ever, ever, ever have to have any maintenance done at a place other than that MOPAR garage you were complaining that was 45 minutes away.>

Have had maintenance done twice in Nagano (using domestic dealers) - not been an issue fortunately.

Of course they are not going to invest in a market that sells something like 250,000 vehicles per year, for all makes and models.>

Then what are they complaining about, and why are we having this discussion :)? Metric system and right hand drive may be issues for the US makers. I have even heard they complain about the cost of land for dealerships as an issue. OK, they are all issues that the makers need to sort out. But they surely cannot be construed as barriers to trade.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Take a look at the Ford website in the UK and there are over 20 different models for sale.If the Ford RS were on sale in Japan Id have it in my drive right now! 90%of the cars are comparable with any Japanese equivalents. Maybe, if there were a US factory here in Japan then there would certainly be more cars on sale here but why bother when car ownership in China is on the rise and in Japan it is not.......

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Are there people who truly believe that Americans want jobs in dingy factories making cheap plastic crap just to take those jobs away from 3rd world countries?

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Commentators unfamiliar with Shaken...

http://aretcars.com/shaken-guide/

Farming and agriculture is a political minefield, any Diet MP that wants to retain there seat would be mindful not to rock the boat or rum these proud producers up the wrong way. J Agriculture lobby is powerful when deploying there vote. Having said that sometimes I need wheelchair assistance when clocking the prices of fruit & vegs at Sunshine. No complaints on the quality though.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

No problem. Japan invests billions in the US every year for decades. Now just make it sound like it is all because of Trump, and his ego will be pleased.

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These cars, while compact, do not or would not have the "yellow" number plate, (660CC or lower) and would be more expensive, and less attractive to owners

Most Japanese cars sold in Japan are not Kei cars. And the shakken system itself is an example of the barriers Japan has put into place to keep foreign cars out.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Talk is cheap, promises easily broken and winds change... wouldn't it be more prudent to show what Japan has done up to this point to bolster the US economy? And then from there ask what USA wants from Japan?

Abe could very well put down an offer above and beyond what Trump was expecting to walk away with.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Last week I bought a new crockpot through Amazon Japan. It's an import from the US. It arrived in its original box, with all its original paperwork, instructions, recipe book, etc. - all in English and only English

Cleo,

Chances are that crockpot you bought was NEVER intended to be sold outside the US, hence English only

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Chances are that crockpot you bought was NEVER intended to be sold outside the US, hence English only

Exactly! And the US car manufacturers seem to put no more effort into tailoring their products for the Japanese market than do the manufacturers of an appliance most Japanese have probably never even heard of, much less want to own.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I know a Japanese company that opened a factory in the US and had to close it after 2 years. The quality of the product was so poor from incompetent, lazy employees that it was affecting sales. They had to move back to Japan

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

There are already certified mechanics carrying out shaken on a daily basis. No need for anything extra, unless there's something 'special' about American cars that yer average mechanic can't fathom...?

You know little about automobiles today, or should I refer to them as "horse-less" carriages for your sake? Every wonder why folks take their Toyota's to a Toyota dealership and not Daihatsu?

It's not as simple as you think, and it's not just about American cars either.

I know a Japanese company that opened a factory in the US and had to close it after 2 years. The quality of the product was so poor from incompetent, lazy employees that it was affecting sales. They had to move back to Japan

Couldn't have been much of a company in the first place, particularly a Japanese one, if it closed that soon, and that they hired people who could do the job.

Not to mention the fact that this company, according to your story here, blames the workers for incompetence and laziness, which also says to me that the company leadership, if you can call it that, did a worse than poor job of training their employees and they themselves are guilty of hiring people unsuited for the work as well.

It takes time and effort, and it sounds to me that someone was looking to make a fast buck here and expected miracles without any hard work or effort on their part.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Every wonder why folks take their Toyota's to a Toyota dealership and not Daihatsu?

It's not as simple as you think, and it's not just about American cars either.

It's apparently simple enough to have 'do-it-yourself' shaken as well as any number of garages that will handle any make of car. And again, it doesn't seem to be a problem for the European cars.

It takes time and effort, and it sounds to me that someone was looking to make a fast buck here and expected miracles without any hard work or effort on their part.

That's what people have been telling you about American car imports..... :-)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Exactly! And the US car manufacturers seem to put no more effort into tailoring their products for the Japanese market than do the manufacturers of an appliance most Japanese have probably never even heard of, much less want to own.

Cleo,

I think you misunderstood, the crockpot was for the US or an English market, SOMEBODY sold & sent it to Japan, NOT where the manufacturer was intending it to go.

It's apparently simple enough to have 'do-it-yourself' shaken

I have done that before BUT there were signs saying NO foreign made cars allowed, so you MUST use a garage, this was in Chiba. Also said heavily modified cars etc were no go on your own

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I think you misunderstood, the crockpot was for the US or an English market

No, you are the one not understanding.

I know the crockpot was aimed at the American market (not an English market, not with carrots measured in cups), I know they are making no effort to sell in Japan. I went online and found it because I wanted a crockpot and they don't sell them (not good ones, anyways) in Japan.

What you aren't getting is that the US car manufacturers make no more effort to target the Japanese car market than do manufacturers, like the crockpot people, with no intention to sell to Japan. Even though there are lots of competitors; if someone wants a new car they only need walk down the street to find half a dozen showrooms offering very good cars for sale, that match the Japanese market.

We have to pass the same shaken as everyone else / Japanese roads and parking spaces are too small / No one understands inches etc etc are nothing but excuses. There is no effort made.

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I was only commenting on the crockpot :)

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@Yubaru: Actually it's an industry leader and they tried to make the factory work for years.

Crappy employees who were full of entitlement and unbridled laziness. Perhaps you don't get back to the US anymore?

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