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Japanese gov't website allowed anti-Korean resident messages

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Koreans were also blamed for earthquakes and in 1923 were executed. if you think that's old news, during the 2002 shared games in soccer between Japan and South Korea I never heard so much racism in my life against Koreans. Echoed again in the more recent comments on the gov website. Scratch the surface and you will find an intemperate xenophobic nation.

The history of hatred for Koreans from Japanese runs long and deep and no one will lift a finger to stop it. Ignoring it doesn't work. That's not a solution.

-1 ( +17 / -18 )

"I guess whoever was in charge at the time read them and decided to respect individual opinions. 

Or never read them since they don't care what the public thinks but used this system as a cover to act like they care.

0 ( +10 / -10 )

"I guess whoever was in charge at the time read them and decided to respect individual opinions. We will study how to deal with it after examining its contents in detail," a spokesperson for the Cabinet Office said recently.

Or quite likely ' whoever was in charge ' was simply a closet racist oyaji bureaucrat who saw no problem with those posts.

-4 ( +9 / -13 )

"I guess whoever was in charge at the time read them and decided to respect individual opinions

Good on that person, censorship on the web is a crime and a delusion and individual points of view should be respected. The internet is not your personal safe space

7 ( +18 / -11 )

Or quite likely ' whoever was in charge ' was simply a closet racist oyaji bureaucrat who saw no problem with those posts.

I don't know that it's likely. I've been a moderator on a forum in the past, it's hard to decide which posts to delete, and which to let stand. On top of this, Japanese people generally tend to be cautious, and deleting a post from a government site is an action that could cause problems, which would cause them to be more cautious. The site in question was asking for opinions on political issues, and these posts, as despicable as they are, are political issues, which makes the decision to delete them a harder one to make.

They were in a "damned if they do, damned if they don't situation." They are getting grief now for not deleting the posts, but they would have gotten grief then, had they deleted the posts.

Hard decision either way.

16 ( +18 / -2 )

As Japan has not enacted any

anti-discrimination laws then any foreigner in Japan can be excluded,abused and berated on the basis of their race.

The perpetrators of such acts do not need to fear punishment or redress.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Good on that person, censorship on the web is a crime and a delusion and individual points of view should be respected. The internet is not your personal safe space

Free speech should be respected, but not when it becomes hateful racist rhetoric.

-6 ( +8 / -14 )

Free speech should be respected, but not when it becomes hateful racist rhetoric.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

As many have eluded to; this could be a tough call.

My thoughts are that I do not think such speech should be on a government website. If people make such hateful statements in private forums, then so be it. But these should be removed from a government website.

As Strangerland pointed out I think it would take alot for an individual person in Japan to remove this kind of post. It would more likely have to be done after obtaining agreement or some type of consensus.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

sf2kToday 06:54 am JST

The history of hatred for Koreans from Japanese runs long and deep and no one will lift a finger to stop it. Ignoring it doesn't work. That's not a solution.

Sure it exists. But it doesn't compare to the hatred for Japanese by Koreans.

6 ( +18 / -12 )

No excuses, those messages should have been deleted immediately.

The Japanese government and many of its citizens need to do a better job of not treating its Korean residents like third class citizens.

Of course not all Japanese people are out there spewing hatred and driving black mini vans with loud speakers blaring anti Korean hate speeches, but still.

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

Sure it exists. But it doesn't compare to the hatred for Japanese by Koreans.

The Koreans I know don't hate the Japanese, a very sweeping provocative statement and even if correct two wrongs don't make a right. We socialize with a group of us, dining, exhibitions, day trips and we are Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Taiwanese, and me the single non Asian Brit. Not all Japanese can be claimed to hate Koreans.

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

The Koreans I know don't hate the Japanese, a very sweeping provocative statement and even if correct two wrongs don't make a right. We socialize with a group of us, dining, exhibitions, day trips and we are Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Taiwanese, and me the single non Asian Brit. Not all Japanese can be claimed to hate Koreans.

Very true and well said.

But unfortunately too many people form their opinions of entire countries and the people in it, through news headlines.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

But unfortunately too many people form their opinions of entire countries and the people in it, through news headlines.

And some people take money to spread division and hatred on the internet and in real life. The ordinary people of the Koreas, Japan, China and Taiwan have a common enemy: their own governments. Not each other.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

The real issue here is that everyone has a right to propose new legislation to shape society, regardless of how reprehensible others find it. It's nearly impossible to censor or criminalise speech when it comes to suggesting new political ideas.

What is the difference between someone who says 'kick out Koreans' and someone who says 'I suggest a change in the law that would make it legal to deport all ethnic Koreans'? Both express the same basic idea but the second could never be censored by the government or be subject to any sort of hate speech legislation. To do so would be to criminalise people who call for the repeal of existing legislation. It's a sticky situation. Opening the website to public comment was obviously not the brightest idea.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

What is the difference between someone who says 'kick out Koreans' and someone who says 'I suggest a change in the law that would make it legal to deport all ethnic Koreans'? Both express the same basic idea but the second could never be censored by the government or be subject to any sort of hate speech legislation.

@M3x3 - But both examples are hate speech. How could you think they are not?

Do you know who else made a similar sort of speech, proposing to deport everyone who belongs to a particular ethnic group? Hint: it's a prominent historical figure, born in Austria...

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

It's called FREEDOM OF SPEECH! Hate speech is also a delusion. What "PC" culture actually is, is a bunch adults that finished growing up after the age of 14, and your tender little feelings get hurt too easily!

Don't like it? Don't read it! Delicate little flowers aren't suited for this world, so I suggest exiting before the next financial crash begins, you won't last!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@Heckleberry

@M3x3 - But both examples are hate speech. How could you think they are not?

I definitely think the second is protected speech. It is suggesting a change in the law, even if I find that change to be driven by reprehensible motives. If suggestions to change the law are no longer protected speech, we end up privileging certain laws which can never be altered because people are no longer free to speak against them. It's antithetical to any free democracy. The most important use of free speech is arguably when people call for changes to the law.

To expand on your Hitler example; In Germany it is illegal to organise a march to celebrate Hitler's birthday, but it remains perfectly legal to organise a march of people who might wish to celebrate Hitler's birthday and are calling for the law to be changed.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

What "PC" culture actually is, is a bunch adults that finished growing up after the age of 14, and your tender little feelings get hurt too easily!

The internet is ideally suited to you I think. It allows you to throw around your childish playground taunts from behind the safety of a keyboard, then screech in capital letters when someone protests. We both know that people like you don't have the courage to actually express your opinions face to face. It's easier to be outraged on online eh?

0 ( +5 / -5 )

The anti-Korean messages are horrible. Absolutely disgusting. But it's a price that must be paid for freedom of speech, folks.

I'm not talking about incitement to violence, of course. That's not free speech.

But otherwise, as terrible as these comments are, people have a right to make them.

Once we start deciding that some people can't speak, then we run the very real risk of forfeiting our OWN free speech. A very slippery slope.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

"I guess whoever was in charge at the time read them and decided to respect individual opinions. We will study how to deal with it after examining its contents in detail,"

Where's the outrage of the people who only last week -- like tinawatanabe -- claimed the homepage preceding the Winter Olympics that left Japan off the map was a big conspiracy and Koreans should be punished, etc. etc.

Suddenly all are silent, or share the "freedom of speech" opinion, despite this being actual hate speech.

-8 ( +7 / -15 )

If the messages directly promoted violence, they should be deleted and even investigated imo, but short of that....

Still, why does a country of 120+ million feel threatened by half a million? Bit perplexing tbh.

Its time the Japanese and Korean relationship moved on. I am sincerely hoping the peace process between North and South Korea might move the needle for Japan and Korea in the future as well. I have argued that the U.S should stay out of that particular fight but maybe they should get involved. Try and get those two on the same page or do we keep going with the hate for another 1000 years? Whats the point?

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Anti-Korean messages are mattered in Japan while anti-Japan messages in Korea are taken as applausible act.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

Sure it exists. But it doesn't compare to the hatred for Japanese by Koreans.

You can just say these messages are trash you know.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Anti-Korean messages are mattered in Japan while anti-Japan messages in Korea are taken as applausible act.

Whatever happens in another country does not excuse what is happening here.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Whatever happens in another country does not excuse what is happening here.

Exactly. The inability to call out these trash comments for what they are is a bit disturbing.

The ‘Yes, bit they do it more’ argument is very suspicious.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

@Matt Hartwell

Still, why does a country of 120+ million feel threatened by half a million? Bit perplexing tbh.

Koreans are to Japan what Jews were to Germany.

There is a conspiracy theory that all the successful and rich people are Korean who are working to undermine Japan.

Like Son Masayoshi(The richest man in Japan), Togo Shigenori(Imperial Japan's foreign minister at the opening and closing hours of the Pacific War. Persuaded the Emperor to surrender unconditionally. Japanese rightwingers blame Togo for triggering the demise of Imperial Japan), Kimura Takuya(Disputed, Unconfirmed), Abe San(Abe family is said to have originated from Bohai 1000 years ago and the family considered itself Korean until Abe Shinzo's father. Abe Shinzo strongly disputes this and considers himself 100% Japanese), Tomoyasu Hotei(Abe Akie's rumored boyfriend. Akie was Hotei's fan all her life), etc. 20% of Japan's professional baseball players are said to be Zainichi.

I am sincerely hoping the peace process between North and South Korea might move the needle for Japan and Korea in the future as well.

Actually the unification would accelerate the inevitable war between Japan and Korea to settle old dispute.

-12 ( +0 / -12 )

More than 480,000 Korean residents were in Japan as of the end of June 2017, according to the Justice Ministry. Most of them are descendants of Koreans who came, or were forced to come, to Japan during Japan's 1910-1945 colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula.

This is imo the root of the pbm. These ppl i.e. 2nd/3rd/4th generation Korean/Japanese, aren't "Korean residents", they're/should be/should feel Japanese.

Although Japan's definitely at fault for failing to assimilate/integrate Korean migrants (and others) better, I still think that these 2nd/3rd/4th generation K/J shouldn't identify as Korean. Reckon this would go a long way towards minimizing the risk/number of "go back to your country' types of comments. Japan's their country, period.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Japan is a Democratic Country. Where is freedom of the Media ?

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Schopenhauer: "Anti-Korean messages are mattered in Japan while anti-Japan messages in Korea are taken as applausible act."

You almost sound envious in your defense of the hate speech. You know, Kim Jung-Un and former NK dictators, as well as SK hate speech, is often justified because of Japan's past atrocities. Now, do you believe that justifies them? or do you think it's just an excuse and they should rise above it and cease such behaviour? Because based on your comment, you do not.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Udondashi: "Japan is a Democratic Country. Where is freedom of the Media ?"

Hate speech does not belong in freedom of speech. Do you think old men in black trucks should be free to scream AT CHILDREN that they are cockroaches and should die while the kids are simply going to school? You think that should be protected under the law instead of the kids being protected?

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

goldorack: You make some good points, and I agree that Japan is their country and they should identify with it as such, but I know people who have naturalized, and they are treated WORSE than those who have not. Remember, you're still legally allowed to check family history in the registry in some cases, and you can see if a person has naturalized. I've met people who had no problem walking up to me and saying, "Don't talk to that woman, she's Korean -- you can tell by the name. It's not a Japanese traditional name!", etc. I've heard that dozens of times, and always with a tone of scorn, warnings not to trust them, etc. Hell, even the admittance by the Emperor that there is Korean blood in the Imperial line draws pure anger and even fury to this day.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

I've met people who had no problem walking up to me and saying, "Don't talk to that woman, she's Korean -- you can tell by the name. It's not a Japanese traditional name!", etc. I've heard that dozens of times, and always with a tone of scorn, warnings not to trust them, etc.

They might have a point though, I've met dozens, possibly hundreds, of Koreans in Japan who openly hate the country and wish harm and misfortune on it, always with a tone of scorn. Therefore I would say this is a commonly held belief among their type.

It appears that everyone has anecdotal evidence to support their spurious views.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Meryanne: "It appears that everyone has anecdotal evidence to support their spurious views."

It's not spurious. Even those who have nationalized often get stigmatized if people know or suspect they are ethnic Korean. Now, why on earth would you hate people who treat you like that, I wonder? I suppose you think African Americans and Jews should be more neighborly to White supremacists? No difference here. A lot of said White supremacists engage in the same kind of hatred, telling people born and raised in the US or other nations to "go back to their own country", or worse.

Next you'll be saying that's "spurious" and "anecdotal", too. Denial never helps, Merryanne. Consider yourself part of the problem.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

Free speech should be respected, but not when it becomes hateful racist rhetoric.

Wrong

it should be not when it it becomes a threat or spreading false emegencies.

It is regrettable that Japan had adopted watered down non-American version of free speech.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

OssanAmerica: "Sure it exists. But it doesn't compare to the hatred for Japanese by Koreans."

Ah, so, it's all okay then. They cancel each other out. Japan should be the racist xenophobes you admit they are because Koreans are towards Japan. Got it.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

OssanAmerica

Today  09:06 am JST

Sure it exists. But it doesn't compare to the hatred for Japanese by Koreans

The level of (unhealthy) obsession between them are indeed the stuff of legends.

But i must say this group really does take it to the next (if not comical...) level

https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/why-south-korea-so-obsessed-japan

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Is that government website designed like chan-style 2ch forums?

If yes then the banter between japanese and korean postings is just par for the course.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Free speech should be respected, but not when it becomes hateful racist rhetoric

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I heard these are the comments posted in the section of Japanese Welfare Public Assistance issue, as there are lots of illegal recipients including foreigners these days, especially Korean people.

For instance, a Korean family received 11 million yen per year illegally, while applications of Japanese for the welfare assistance are getting more and more difficult to be accepted, and the comments seem to be the one criticizing the government policy about that.

It is not fair not to give this information first and pick up only harsh words written at the end of a rather long comment.

In any other countries can foreigners receive welfare money easier than their own nationals?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@virgo98

surely, it is up to the welfare office here to assess each case on its merits.

The majority of welfare is as you are well aware, claimed by Japanese applicants!

It is not as if there are boatloads coming here to receive welfare is it?

To label those born and educated in Japan as a ‘foreigner’ (most Koreans are) is more than a little disingenuous, is it not?

They might hold a Korean passport or none at all but Korea is as alien to most of them as it is to me.

And one more point.

If threats against Koreans not real then why do the Korean embassy and consulate here have a 365 days /24 hours a year police presence and the Japanese embassy in Seoul doesn’t?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

@kurisupisu

The percentage of welfare recipients is the problem. It is already a burden for each local community. You are taking the situation too lightly.

https://www.zakzak.co.jp/society/politics/news/20150215/plt1502150830001-n1.htm

The percentage of recipients among Korean residents is 14.2% and higher than other foreigners groups without doubt. The percentage of Chinese residents is only 1.6%. And it is true there are lots of illegal Korean recipients.

Also, The Japanese Supreme Court which states that permanent foreign residents have no legal right to social security payments, although they can be awarded these payments based on the discretion of local authorities.

https://www.japancrush.com//2014/stories/foreigners-not-entitled-to-welfare-rules-supreme-court.html

Oh, you have the point by the way. Japanese embassy in Korea should be presented with the police 365 days / 24 hours, and they should avoid the demo or any other harassment in front of the embassy, and remove that ugly statue from the public road (Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations + Public road act in Korea, if they have).

I don't understand Why Korean government do not do this appropriately.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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