politics

Gov't puts off plan to extend retirement age of public servants

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Right, but the private sector is already screwing with the folks who "retire" at 60.

They can continue working from 60 to 65, but they become contracted employees with no bonuses and their salary gets cut too. In effect companies are getting workers to do the same jobs that they were doing previous to "retiring" for between 30% to 40% less money paid out.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

So basically he is saying, secure getting elected then pass the bill? Good to know that getting elected are more important than the country's stability.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Yubaru ... You hit the nail on the head.

Right, but the private sector is already screwing with the folks who "retire" at 60. 

They can continue working from 60 to 65, but they become contracted employees with no bonuses and their salary gets cut too. In effect companies are getting workers to do the same jobs that they were doing previous to "retiring" for between 30% to 40% less money paid out.

The private sector is the model for what the government wants to do with public servants.

Something is very odd about a country that has so few human labor resources, that they have to make a law to allow for 500,000 immigrant laborers.

Or maybe a more accurate choice of words is not what the government wants either the private sector or public servants to know ... The ruling class. does not have enough ****'disposable human capital.'

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Here in the States, a person may work past age 65 and collect Social Security payments without penalty.

I have known several people who retired, and then were re-hired on either a full-time or part-time basis to assist their employer. In this case, they collected their retirement pay and got paid for the hours they worked. The employer must have thought it was a good idea, since they were glad to pay.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If those threatened with a reduction in pay decided en masse to reject the offer and retire, the government would play hell replacing them, and the bureaucracy would grind to a halt. One of the biggest barriers facing workers here is their inability to band together and see that they potentially have great power. Years of operant conditioning tend to have that effect.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Yubaru, you're right. But those men generally are receiving half of their pension while still working. And there are companies that give bonuses but not as fat as they used to be. I just think fair enough esp for us who works hard without receiving extra except our rates.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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