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Japan GSDF resumes Osprey flights near Tokyo

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Seems they figured out responsible party for mechanical safety issues and failure. Makes sense, aircraft proven for many years in Tough Afghanistan, so for something to go wrong in Japan makes no sense, except foul play.

The mishap investigation, which includes the aircraft and engine manufacturer along with members of the various military organizations who operate Ospreys, has identified the component that failed, but the kind of failure is not something they have seen before.

Until the failure is fully understood the Ospreys resume flying with one or more performance restrictions designed to reduce the load on the part that failed.

I flew the Osprey's predecessor the CH-46. There were a series of really horrible mishaps traced to a mechanical component in the drive line called a Quill Shaft. To reduce loads on the Quill Shaft our maximum airspeed was reduced from 145 knots to 120 knots. We operated at that reduced speed for a couple of years until a program was developed to overhaul the entire CH-46 fleet, a program that included a new, stronger Quill Shaft. Modified CH-46s were cleared to fly 145 knots and we had no more problems with failed Quill Shafts. I have to assume the problem with the Osprey will be dealt with in a similar fashion.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

When, however, the U.S. decided to start the regular flights of Ospreys despite the fact that the cause of the Yakushima crash was still unknown, Japan followed suit in a knee-jerk fashion.

That is not exactly correct. The part that failed and caused the mishap is known. The failure mode is apparently something not seen before but if you know what part failed you can do things to reduce stress on that part. Like I said, I used to fly the CH-46 and it had at least as bad a reputation as the CV-22 for killing people. Once we knew what part was killing our crews we reduced airspeed, and in doing so reduced the stresses on the part that was failing. No more failures. Eventually a much improved part was installed and that problem was solved. The previous problem that caused a bunch of crashes was solved with a new digital flight control system that made it impossible for the Marine pilots to bypass a safety interlock they previously were bypassing.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

After the Yakushima incident, the U.S. government ordered all Ospreys deployed worldwide to be grounded until the cause of the crash is known. Japan, which has a fleet of 14 Ospreys, followed suit.

When, however, the U.S. decided to start the regular flights of Ospreys despite the fact that the cause of the Yakushima crash was still unknown, Japan followed suit in a knee-jerk fashion. 

Well, what does it all mean?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It's perfect example of total lack of transparency, that's everywhere, more Govt. gas-lighting to make the naive public feel otherwise, standard stuff in this day and age.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

No more of that flying crap over Japan..

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Japan's "defense forces" prioritize circumstances of US forces than defending safety of own country people.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Seems they figured out responsible party for mechanical safety issues and failure. Makes sense, aircraft proven for many years in Tough Afghanistan, so for something to go wrong in Japan makes no sense, except foul play.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

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