politics

Japan may include Taiwan among nations giving flowers at Abe funeral

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It must be gratifying for the Taiwanese to be relegated down by their former colonial masters….

-12 ( +2 / -14 )

kurisupisuToday  06:52 am JST

It must be gratifying for the Taiwanese to be relegated down by their former colonial masters….

About as much as the Indian delegation at Eliz II's funeral in London.

"UK Foreign Secretary James Cleverly has expressed gratitude for the representation by Indian President Droupadi Murmu at the funeral of Queen Elizabeth, saying it was really noticed"

https://www.business-standard.com/article/international/uk-official-thanks-india-for-senior-representation-at-queen-s-funeral-122092200189_1.html

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Japan may include Taiwan among nations

Include Taiwan among the names of countries

Japan acknowledged the people's republic of china as China's sole legitimate government and severed ties with Taiwan

Japan is calling Taiwan a nation ?

Japan is calling Taiwan a country ?

Taiwan isn't an independent country or nation !

The United nations doesn't recognize Taiwan as a nation or country because it isn't !

Sad to say that Taiwan had actually achieved independence as a country before Japan colonized Taiwan for 50 years

The truth is Japan is to blame for taking Taiwans independence and starting ww2

China would like Taiwan to become part of China's one County two systems as a self governing autonomous region of China.

I doubt this can be stopped.

-16 ( +2 / -18 )

If Japan announces Taiwan as a country at Abe's so called state funeral memorial thingymajig then we can expect China to go ballistic .

It will only make matters worse with the already delicate relationship between China and Japan !

-14 ( +3 / -17 )

Taiwan delegates are also not likely to be invited to an event Tuesday night after the funeral

Japan is two-faced

-11 ( +5 / -16 )

It's great and quite reasonable to invite Taiwanese officials to the state funeral. Japan-Taiwan is a special bilateral relation.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Good. Free Taiwan has every right to pay their respects in the same manner as every nation at the Funeral.

It must be remembered also how incredibly popular PM Abe was among the Taiwanese.

If Japan announces Taiwan as a country at Abe's so called state funeral memorial thingymajig then we can expect China to go ballistic .

Since when have Communist China not been enraged by anything Japan does? Who cares about them anyway.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Around 4,300 people are expected to attend the service

and at about ¥ 1.6B for the funeral……..that comes out to a bit over ¥370,000 per person.

what are they each getting? MacBooks and an iPhone as participation gifts?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Taiwan delegates are also not likely to be invited to an event Tuesday night after the funeral

Japan is two-faced

Of course!

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

Taiwan's delegates are also not likely to be invited to an event on Tuesday night after the funeral, at which representatives of foreign nations will offer condolences to the late leader's widow Akie Abe and Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, the sources said.

Feel that love from the Japanese, Ossan!

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Awa no GaijinToday  08:08 am JST

The United nations doesn't recognize Taiwan as a nation or country because it isn't !

Wrong. The UN doesn't recongnize Taiwan as a nation because it has declared independence and sovereugnty, and has not applied for UN membership.

Sad to say that Taiwan had actually achieved independence as a country before Japan colonized Taiwan for 50 years

The truth is Japan is to blame for taking Taiwans independence and starting ww2

Wrong again. Taiwan has been owned by the Dutch, Spain, China (Qing Dynasty) before it became a Japanese colony.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@OssanAmerica

Awa no GaijinToday  08:08 am JST

The United nations doesn't recognize Taiwan as a nation or country because it isn't !

Wrong. The UN doesn't recongnize Taiwan as a nation because it has declared independence and sovereugnty, and has not applied for UN membership.

Err...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Member_states_of_the_United_Nations#Republic_ofChina(1945%E2%80%931971)

Republic of China (1945–1971)

Further information: China and the United Nations

Areas controlled by the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China

The Republic of China (ROC) joined the UN as an original member on 24 October 1945, and as set out by the United Nations Charter, Chapter V, Article 23, became one of the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council.[20] In 1949, as a result of the Chinese Civil War, the Kuomintang-led ROC government lost effective control of mainland China and relocated to the island of Taiwan, and the Communist Party-led government of the People's Republic of China (PRC), declared on 1 October 1949, took control of mainland China.

> The UN was notified on 18 November 1949 of the formation of the Central People's Government of the People's Republic of China; however, the Government of the Republic of China continued to represent China at the UN, despite the small size of the ROC's jurisdiction of Taiwan and a number of smaller islands compared to the PRC's jurisdiction of mainland China.

> As both governments claimed to be the sole legitimate representative of China, proposals to effect a change in the representation of China in the UN were discussed but rejected for the next two decades, as the ROC was still recognized as the sole legitimate representative of China by a majority of UN members.[citation needed] Both sides rejected compromise proposals to allow both states to participate in the UN, based on the One-China policy.

> By the 1970s, a shift had occurred in international diplomatic circles and the PRC had gained the upper hand in international diplomatic relations and recognition count. On 25 October 1971, the 21st time the United Nations General Assembly debated on the PRC's admission into the UN, United Nations General Assembly Resolution 2758 was adopted, by which it recognized that "the representatives of the Government of the People's Republic of China are the only lawful representatives of China to the United Nations and that the People's Republic of China is one of the five permanent members of the Security Council," and decided "to restore all its rights to the People's Republic of China and to recognize the representatives of its Government as the only legitimate representatives of China to the United Nations, and to expel forthwith the representatives of Chiang Kai-shek from the place which they unlawfully occupy at the United Nations and in all the organizations related to it." 

> This effectively transferred the seat of China in the UN, including its permanent seat on the Security Council, from the ROC to the PRC, and expelled the ROC from the UN.

> In addition to losing its seat in the UN, the UN Secretary-General concluded from the resolution that the General Assembly considered Taiwan to be a province of "China", which refers to the Greater China region. Consequently, the Secretary-General decided that it was not permitted for the ROC to become a party to treaties deposited with it.

For all intents and purpose did the UN take away the ROC's accreditation. Period.

Moreover:

Bids for readmission as the representative of Taiwan

...

These proposed resolutions referred to the ROC under a variety of names: "Republic of China in Taiwan" (1993–94), "Republic of China on Taiwan" (1995–97, 1999–2002), "Republic of China" (1998), "Republic of China (Taiwan)" (2003) and "Taiwan" (2004–06).

However, all fourteen attempts were unsuccessful as the General Assembly's General Committee declined to put the issue on the Assembly's agenda for debate, under strong opposition from the PRC.

While all these proposals were vague, requesting the ROC be allowed to participate in UN activities without specifying any legal mechanism, in 2007 the ROC submitted a formal application under the name "Taiwan" for full membership in the UN. 

However, the application was rejected by the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs citing General Assembly Resolution 2758, without being forwarded to the Security Council. Secretary-General of the United Nations Ban Ki-moon stated that:

The position of the United Nations is that the People's Republic of China is representing the whole of China as the sole and legitimate representative Government of China. The decision until now about the wish of the people in Taiwan to join the United Nations has been decided on that basis. The resolution (General Assembly Resolution 2758) that you just mentioned is clearly mentioning that the Government of China is the sole and legitimate Government and the position of the United Nations is that Taiwan is part of China.[

...

The following year two referendums in Taiwan on the government's attempts to regain participation at the UN did not pass due to low turnout.

That fall the ROC took a new approach, with its allies submitting a resolution requesting that the "Republic of China (Taiwan)" be allowed to have "meaningful participation" in the UN specialized agencies. Again the issue was not put on the Assembly's agenda.

For all intents and purposes did Taiwan apply again and again and got kicked in teeth repeatedly. Period.

As far as "Taiwanese independence" goes:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan_independence_movement

Currently, Taiwan's political status is ambiguous. 

> China currently claims it is a province of the People's Republic of China, whereas the current Tsai Ing-wen administration of Taiwan maintains that Taiwan is already an independent country as the Republic of China (ROC) and thus does not have to push for any sort of formal independence

As such, the ROC consisting of Taiwan and other islands under its control already conducts official diplomatic relations with and is recognized by 13 United Nations-recognized countries.

The use of "independence" for Taiwan can be ambiguous. If some supporters articulate that they agree to the independence of Taiwan, they may either be referring to the notion of formally creating an independent Taiwanese state or to the notion that Taiwan has become synonymous with the current Republic of China and is already independent (as reflected in the concept of One Country on Each Side).

Some supporters advocate the exclusion of Kinmen and Matsu, which are controlled by Taiwan but are located off the coast of mainland China.[3]

Essentially, Taiwan considers itself "indepent (enough)" and, while keeping the meaning of their thoughts ambiguous enough, is not pushing for any further "(clarified) independence".

Long story short: the disputes around Taiwan date back decades and can not be summarized by inane (and wishful) soundbites.

Luckily for the Taiwanese they have smarter people leading the show than the silly soundbites some have to offer.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

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