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Japan considers simplifying emperor's abdication ceremony

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they could be taken as a proof that he is relinquishing the throne based on his own will, thus violating the supreme law.

Well he actually IS abdicating by his own will and is not being forced out.

Another thing that keeps getting over looked, there is no law stating he CAN'T abdicate. The absence of a thing does not mean it can not occur!

9 ( +9 / -0 )

I wonder how much paperwork the poor guy has to do to get that done.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

My god, work on modernizing the country for friggin sake. We are really gunna spend more time and money thinking about Emperor’s and Kings?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

We are really gunna spend more time and money thinking about Emperor’s and Kings?

Yes, because it's an important part of the new LDP constitution for Japan:

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/community/2013/07/02/issues/the-ldp-constitution-a-preview-of-things-to-come/

2 ( +4 / -2 )

You know, for someone who is supposed to be a living GOD, the poor guy doesn't have the basic rights of any of his constituents: to be able to retire in peace and enjoy the few remaining years he has left.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

You know, for someone who is supposed to be a living GOD

Outside of the right-wing nuts in this country, there are few if any that believe he is a living God, that belief died out with his father.

If anything, he is loved by the people BECAUSE he is so close to the people, contrary to previous Emperors that kept their distance. This Emperor has been all over the country, working hard to show his love and concerns for all the people of Japan.

He is throwing nuts and bolts into the machinery here because he is doing something that people never considered or prepared for, his abdication is a microcosm of all that's right and wrong with this country.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

What they going to just kick him out? He's the last voice against Abe.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

A 送別会 at the local Izakaya should be enough.

Another lavish party for the elite...

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Why March of 2019? Will the new era begin in January of 2019, or will we have three months of Heisei, and then on April 1st begin the new era? Why it is taking so damn long to carry out the poor man's wishes if unfathomable!

2 ( +5 / -3 )

they could be taken as a proof that he is relinquishing the throne based on his own will

Yes, because heaven forbid the Emperor be allowed to make decisions based on his own free will.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Quit punishing him and let him retire tomorrow

4 ( +7 / -3 )

As Article 4 of the Constitution bans the emperor from having political power, government officials are concerned if the emperor's reasons for abdicating are read out by an agent following old ceremonial tradition, they could be taken as a proof that he is relinquishing the throne based on his own will, thus violating the supreme law

But the same constitution also grants freedom from bondage and freedom to choose one's occupation. The emperor is a Japanese citizen exercising his right to retire. I fail to see how Article 4 applies anyway, as giving up his position hardly amount to exerting "political power".

5 ( +5 / -0 )

2017? old man battled cancer, gets run ragged by the Imperial Agency staffed with hand picked Nippon Kaigai people trying in the face of reality to recreate 1930. I'm not suprised they want to complicate the process as much as possible.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

He's the last voice against Abe.

well said. very suspicious about the next one. why is Abe so keen?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The emperor is a Japanese citizen exercising his right to retire. 

Is he? He is considered the "Head of State" from pretty much a ceremonial position, but is he really a "citizen Consider this the Emperor of Japan does not have a passport, and he does not vote in elections, and can not participate in any political activities. He does not pay taxes either.

So by literal definition..is he a citizen? He certainly is not "stateless"

1 ( +1 / -0 )

IN other words they may re-think their policy of having him drop dead at a ribbon-cutting ceremony at age 85 and at least give him enough time for a weekend getaway at an onsen somewhere.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Outside of the right-wing nuts in this country, there are few if any that believe he is a living God, that belief died out with his father.

Very true only there are ALOT more of those than appear to be.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Ridiculous the whole thing, yes he is to be revered as he really seems to care about people both in Japan and abroad. I'm a bitter old man but I appreciate his state service. I do find it offensive when people around me talk about his God like status. When I ask have they seen the special mirror or sword given to his family by a God.....blank faces.

He and his wife and family have endured the unendurable with grace and compaction they deserve to be treated with as much grace and compaction as they gave.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I wonder how much paperwork the poor guy has to do to get that done. as of now about 15 months worth it would seem.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Heisei deserves more than just a simple farewell!! Heisei made Japan more peaceful and cherishable!:)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Typical Japan - taking forever to make a simple decision.  If they are not careful he will die before they decide (although maybe that is what they are delaying for).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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