politics

Japan ranks lowest among G20 in 2018 women parliamentarians ratio

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kazetsukai: "No big deal..."

Never is for men who want to keep women down and in the kitchen.

"However, the policies and politics depend on that person's ability and perspectives."

Then Japan is in even more trouble than imagined, since most of the old men in power are there through nepotism and wealth, and definitely not skill or talent. That is also the case in the US at present, and other nations, but hey... you just finished saying there's no need for Japan to conform to others' standards, right?

"What each country needs are capable and loyal pragmatic and practical leaders that are willing to "work" with and for their citizens,"

Ouch... once again if that's what you think Japan is in more trouble than ever. I mean, just look at how many times we've heard, "The majority may be against it, but we'll do it and gain their support later through explanation. Please cooperate and understand" in the past couple of years alone, with the thrice failed Osaka Metropolis taking that on only last week, and Abe having used that with the Secrets Law and his "reinterpretation" of the Constitution, using the firetruck model to try and dummy it down for the audience. He did hire a couple of token women -- rightists incapable of doing their jobs and "kioku arimasen!" being their given catch phrase when asked why not. So, you lose on all points, my friend. But it is fun watching you guys struggle to try and explain away Japan's massive gender inequality while it begs to look good on the world stage.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

No big deal...

Equal numbers do not guarantee quality as it does representation. However, the policies and politics depend on that person's ability and perspectives. In government it is not necessarily the equality in numbers of males or females. And there is no need for any country to "conform" to any numerical standards for idealism sake. So such data and statistical analysis are fine but does not mean that any clountry "must" have an "ideal" numerical balance. What each country needs are capable and loyal pragmatic and practical leaders that are willing to "work" with and for their citizens, that have the perspectives necessary and the gumption to act when needed.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Hey hey now...it's not all about quantity, it'a about quality too...and I heard that these ladies can make a great cuppa...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

JenniSchiebel: "So, if there are few women in political office in Japan (or whatever other country), the reason is simple: because not enough women are supporting other women."

How does that explain the attitude of many an old man politician who says, "Women are baby-making machines" and, "Women who want to work and not have more children for our nation are selfish (given the aging population problem)"? Those are but a few of what male politicians have said and not at all apologized for, and the sentiment many share. I would add to what you said, to qualify it, that many women who do not support other women do not do so out of fear of how they would be stigmatized in this still VERY patriarchal society. But don't take my word for it! Here's Aso just last month:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/feb/05/japans-deputy-pm-blames-women-for-nations-falling-population

3 ( +4 / -1 )

bullfighter: "What this article does not tell you is which countries have the most women in parliament. The top two are Rwanda (61.3%) and Cuba (53.2%). China (25.9%), Saudi Arabia (19.9%), and North Korea (16.3%) all do better than Japan (10.6%)."

Let me steer you back to relevant facts. Among the G20, where does Japan rank? And you're just looking at Parliament since you want to deflect, so where is it Japan ranked in overall gender equality among 150 or so countries checked? Wasn't it 122nd or something?

Fail.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

There is no law in Japan barring women from running for political office.

And there is no law in Japan barring people from voting for women.

And, women make up the majority of people in Japan, as well as in other countries.

So, if there are few women in political office in Japan (or whatever other country), the reason is simple: because not enough women are supporting other women.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@bullfighter

you are correct. The average politician age in the USA is a little over 60 and the average politician age in Japan is 55. Most European countries hold higher averages than the U.S.

This article isn’t about politician ages. Furthermore, it isn’t about the success or failures of a political system. It’s more about equal opportunities. Abe’s big re-election push was about getting more women involved. Since it’s a campaign year, one of the biggest focuses is his successes or failures.

Sweden, Iceland, and Finland are all in the top 10 of women opportunities. They are examples of succes.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

But they topped the list for the number of old, old men. And also the shuffling aimlessly in a confused state list.

I wonder how many times I have to point out that the top leaders in the US are notably older than those of Japan. Donald Trump is 72. Abe Shinzo is 64. Nancy Pelosi who has proved herself a major match for Trump is 78. Ruth Bader Ginsberg, a major force on the US Supreme Court is 85. No one on the Japanese Supreme Court is over 70. Further, Japan is run by bureaucrats, not politicians, and they generally retire at 60.

If any country is dominated by a gerontacracy, it is the US, not Japan.

What this article does not tell you is which countries have the most women in parliament. The top two are Rwanda (61.3%) and Cuba (53.2%). China (25.9%), Saudi Arabia (19.9%), and North Korea (16.3%) all do better than Japan (10.6%).

In other words, a large proportion of women in a parliament is not necessarily an indicator of a good or democratic government.

http://archive.ipu.org/wmn-e/classif.htm

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

I'm not surprised at all by these numbers,it takes more than promises and few minor laws to put more women in power.

It takes a change of mind and mentality,but in order to do so this kind of change must come from the educational system and the families.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Embarrassing to say the least.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

This is already well known, although if you point it out people just get upset and say it's "foreign 'opinion'". Abe's "womenomics" resulted in even LESS women being in positions of power than previously.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

The simple crux of the matter is women in Japan at 50% of the population, are miserably represented in leadership roles esp political positions.

The fact that Abe's "All women can Shine" blurt has turned into an empty catch-cry, is actually as demeaning as direct discrimination.

For a World leading democracy, a ranking of 165th in women in parliament is the true disaster and reflects the OB cronyism that is Japan Inc.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

And there is that overused word ‘nonbinding’ once again. Can’t have a law with any teeth.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

So Abe wants to run again for Prime Minister when he has clearly failed at many of his goals. One of his big speeches was about getting more women invovled in politics. However, during his tenure many women seem to be hit with scandals and allegations with the end result being forced out of their position. However, when men are hit with allegations and scandals, they are supported and still manage to keep their positions.

Abe's cabinet went from 5 women to 1 woman and during the same time the lower house went from 17.7% to 10.2%. Women are being forced out either by "scandals," "improper behavior," or "family."

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Now they will scramble to fill "token" positions just to save some international face cos whats coming in 2020....

4 ( +6 / -2 )

But they topped the list for the number of old, old men. And also the shuffling aimlessly in a confused state list.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Gasp!!!

You don't say!!!

Who would ever believe that?!?!

5 ( +6 / -1 )

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