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Japan seeks summit with Chinese leaders

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Island country Japan is sandwiched between US and China ! Poor economy and poor planning to blame?

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

Japan seeks summit with Chinese leaders

Not really. This is where people should use Honne Tatemae example.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

I just saw "Olympus has Fallen". After 9/11, it may have been too soon.

Personally, however, I see it as a propaganda film preparing us (in the US) to endure more devastation on our own shores because we have no choice, since that is a decision made by NK or China. We have to prepare ourselves mentally for such a contingency in order to ensure that we can defeat any such aggression. Yeah, I don't like the message; but the way China is behaving using its proxy NK to bully the world makes me understand that war may be inevitable.

However, I'm also very pleased at how our own strategists are able to devise such an overwhelmingly simple war scenario that could be applied against North Korea and China and lay waste to them without our losing much of anything. Have they the vision to see such a complex strategem? Apparently, we have; and we just showed them that we can think out of the box.

It's not just a movie. It's a warning to North Korea and China to mind their manners.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

China knows what the TPP is all about, which is why it is trying to circumvent it.

Unconditionally and without a doubt, Japan will benefit from the TPP, simply because Japan needs this as a precondition to war. Abe knows that China will continue its demands for the Senkakus, which have been Japanese territory since the 1800's and which were never contested until a few decades ago simply because everyone knows they are Japanese islands.

Japan is now in the process of re-militarizing its society, its industries and its agricultural economy. Consequently, Japan needs to be in a position where it can import everything it needs to function in a wartime environment. Having free access to the agricultural and military-industrial might of all TPP countries ensures that Japan can devote itself entirely to defeating China in the Battle of the Senkakus.

With its superior technology and military expertise, Japan will annihilate the PLA navy and air force, castrating any future military aggression from China against its neighbors in the East China Sea or the South China Sea. That is the real purpose of the TPP. All members of the TPP have agreed to this, and this is the will of the people.

-12 ( +2 / -14 )

Unconditionally and without a doubt, Japan will benefit from the TPP

That's ridiculous, TPP will only benefit transnational mega-corporations like Monsanto, because that's what TPP is really about - something written by corporations for corporations. Which is why EU was suspicious of forming such agreements with the US in the first place, they would never agree to something so ridiculous since they have done their homework. After TPP, Asia's agriculture will forever be dependent on Monsanto's patented crops. It's all according to the America's plan.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Abe has also offered peace overtures to China, repeatedly saying the Japan-China relationship was among Tokyo’s most-important ties.

I have many misgivings about PM Abe and his many diplomatically disastrous gaffes and actions in the past. That aside, I am quite relieved and very pleased to see him take a positive trajectory toward constructive dialog with Japan's neighbors.

Abe's actions here are certainly reflective of the actions and behavior that Japan should practice in building a nation its citizens can take pride in. Kudos here to PM Abe. I hope he keeps it up.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Neither Japan nor US will benefit from TPP in my opinion. As Thomas pointed out, TTP has been initiated by a few American conglomerates to perpetuate and monopolize their business globally. I understand that many businesses in the US are against TPP, and so are in Japan. However, it is politics which is a pain in the neck for the both nations. For Japan, the US is the sole ally, and she is magnificently strong politically, militarily and economically. There is no way for Premier Abe to flatly turn down TPP proposed by President Obama who represents a few American conglomerates. Japan has no choice to attend the TPP discussions. In time, big voices to go against TPP may come out to protect great majority businesses in the US. TPP may be a double-edged sword for President Obama.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Japan seeks summit with Chinese leaders

Better late than never!

Next, how about a meeting with NK leader(s)?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

lachance,

Japan is now in the process of re-militarizing its society

God, I hope not!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

BertieWoosterMar. 25, 2013 - 11:08AM JST "lachance, Japan is now in the process of re-militarizing its society"

God, I hope not!

If you really meant that you would be leading the march against China's military and territorial expansion and threats to it's neighbors. Japan didn't have to even think about it for 70 years because no Asian neighbors were threatening it. China really changed all that now didn't they?

1 ( +6 / -5 )

@OsscanAmerica

Do you want to have a war with China in the current war?

How big is the territory of Japan to bear a big war with China? maybe include Russia. You are just risk the lifes of other Japanese.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

@OsscanAmerica,

And Can you dare to tell me the truth that whose territory is keep expansion in the past 70 years? China or Japan?

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

@OsscanAmerica,

Just answer this: Why is Guam (in the middle of the Pacific) a territory of the USA? Their people are oppressed and like Okinawa have to house a lot of US military.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I am glad they are talking, but realistically neither side is willing to budge.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

viking68Mar. 25, 2013 - the Spratley Islands, Vietnamese territory and attempting to take Japanese territory.

Sorry, but some of your understanding is wrong! Diaoyu/ Senkaku, Spratley Islands and Paracell islands all belong to Taiwan(ROC) according to "Taipei treaty" signed by Taiwan and Japan, witnessed by the US in 1952.

Article 4 of the 1952 Treaty of Peace between the ROC and JP which stated, Japan has renounced all right, title and claim to Taiwan (Formosa) and Penghu (the Pescadores) as well as the Spratly Islands and the Paracel Islands… all treaties, conventions and agreements concluded before December 9, 1941, between China and Japan have become null and void as a consequence of the war.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Abe has also offered peace overtures to China, repeatedly saying the Japan-China relationship was among Tokyo’s most-important ties.

From the one who is most eager to white washing Japan's atrocities in WW2?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Otago1000,

Indeed Abe offered peace overtures to China, but no negotiations on the dispute islets, however, that is the essence of all.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Tiger_In_The_HermitageMar. 25, 2013 - 01:06PM JST @OsscanAmerica, Just answer this: Why is Guam (in the middle of the Pacific) a territory of the USA? Their people are oppressed and >like Okinawa have to house a lot of US military.

Neither the people of Guam nor Okinawa are "oppressed". In contrast China OPPRESSES the entire country of Tibet.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

IRobinMar. 25, 2013 - 09:01PM JST @Otago1000, Indeed Abe offered peace overtures to China, but no negotiations on the dispute islets, however, that is the essence >of all.

Japan is offering to China the opportunity to discuss differences. However as long as China adheres to their "What's mine is mine and let's negotiate what's yours" approach to diplomacy it will go nowhere. If the CCP are unable to maintain power without fanning nationalism and war, perhaps it is time to let the Chinese people establish a real government of their own.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

BertieWooster-san, re-militarizing Japan might just be a good thing. Mainly because of China and NK.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The opportunity from Japan’s perspective would be that if U.S. continues its effort to build a constructive and respectful relationship with China, and Japan deepens its economic interdependence , it would lessen its political instability in the region. If China’s economic strength could draw the U.S. and Japan closer to China, it would lessen the confrontation with China, and there is no doubt that other countries would follow the same pattern. Such a development in the international environment would benefit China substantially.

However, China now views Japan as a competitor and will pursue policies that ignore Japan’s benefits. China is focusing on its strength, which is its economic development, and uses of opportunities brought by economic development to expand its influence. However,if there is a failure in its relationships with the U.S., that could lead to a worst case scenario for China. China will continue to avoid serious confrontation with the U.S., while pursuing national prosperity and military strength. Remember, even with the new trade agreement with Russia, the trade between Russia and China only equal to two months of trade with U.S. and if you add Japan to the total trade, China cannot ignore Japan.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

lachanceMar. 25, 2013 - 08:04AM JST Having free access to the agricultural and military-industrial might of all TPP countries ensures that Japan can devote itself entirely to defeating China in the Battle of the Senkakus. With its superior technology and military expertise, Japan will annihilate the PLA navy and air force, castrating any future military aggression from China against its neighbors in the East China Sea or the South China Sea.

I wouldn't take China lightly. China’s domestically produced weapons have serious problems and are considered unreliable. China has conducted many reverse engineering of weapons from Russia, but its achievements have been dismal. For China to catch up with the U.S., it is more feasible to adopt weapons and technologies from Russia and other militarily advanced countries, rather than trying to develop technology in a independent effort. However, if Russia grows even more economically strong in the future and begins to view China as a threat, it is uncertain whether Russia will still continue to supply advanced weapons and military technologies.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

lRobin, I agree with you. Distorted view of China is prevalent. Some got the idea that the territorial disputes just happened recently but the fact is the territorial disputes have existed for many decades already. Especially with Japan, China had put a lid on the territorial dispute for 40 years until Japan decided to open the lid. Some people tried to feed the idea that China seeks war, threats its neighbours, and has created tension in the region. These are far from the truth, in fact, China’s military expansion is for self-defence and prevention of war. China has adhered to its “peaceful rise” policy. You can see that China has not been in a war with any country for a few decades already. China does not have any military bases in other countries nor tries to interfere with other country’s internal affairs. Actually, China has tried to prevent a number of wars from happening through the UN but some were unsuccessful. China’s arms exports are only 5% of the world total, and you can guess which country has the highest ratio, the US, about six times more than China’s. And, which country has the highest military budget in the world and how many times more than China’s, these you can guess. Which country constantly engages in a war? Of course, the US and for unjustifiable reasons. China now tries to prevent East Asia from being turned into a war zone because the US has changed its focus from the Middle East to Asia. Using the cloak of democracy and freedom, how many more countries have to suffer from these illusive concepts. Terrorism has increased so much in the Middle East that people are living in fear and agony for many years already. This is what we should think of the US, “absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Now, think of how many more innocent people have to die from the next war in Asia? Japan has a chance to prevent this catastrophe but it may choose not to.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

flowers Mar. 26, 2013 - 04:13AM JST China has adhered to its “peaceful rise” policy. You can see that China has not been in a war with any country for a few decades already. China does not have any military bases in other countries nor tries to interfere with other country’s internal affairs. China now tries to prevent East Asia from being turned into a war zone because the US has changed its focus from the Middle East to Asia.

China would be better advised to substantively engage foreign criticisms than to reflexively dismiss them or respond with unconvincing public relations campaigns. Even with relations with Russia, on the surface, there is considerable harmony of worldviews and interests, but underneath lie lingering historical suspicions, growing trade frictions, problems stemming from Russia’s military sales to China. China’s image has also deteriorated in the Middle East from support for the Syrian and Iranian regimes. Even in Africa, China’s image has deteriorated over the past few years as a result of the flood of Chinese companies, its aggressive extraction of oil and other raw materials, aid projects that seem to benefit Chinese construction companies as much as recipient countries and support for dictator governments. China does not have any experience handling such strategic competition amid deep interdependence. Many of these complaints are China’s authoritarian political system and its business practices, which lacks transparency and infested with corruption.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

lRobin, I agree with you. Distorted view of China is prevalent

The world is tired of China's distorted views of history and unsupported claims. China needs to mature and overcome it's own internal political problems if it wants to get any respect from the international community.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

sfjp330, there will always be criticisms about China in every move. There are two sides to every coin so for Russia and China we can also see improvements in their relationships, their territorial disputes being resolved, new trade deals, and closer military ties. From what we can see they have come to a win-win solution, and at least, no more cold war between each other. Can we say the same for the US and Russia. In the Middle East, China is trying to prevent more crises in the area. That means seeing deteriorating of its image now is still better than doing nothing and seeing more wars irrupting in the regions. In the long run those countries will come to appropriate China’s stance in the matter which is peace. Though, I believe the image of the US is much worse than China in the Middle East. Now, let me ask you, is there a country in the world that does not welcome China? None, every country in the world has trade deal with China. But, can we ask the same for the US? The West has been criticizing China in its dealing with dictator governments in Africa, but China doesn’t care about their political affairs, what should be the most importance is the people in those countries. If you have a chance to go to Africa, you will see how China has improved their infrastructures, their economies and their livelihoods. Africa now is much better than the 50 years period that the West has been there, so what else do you expect. Every move that China makes will follow by negative criticism from the West, but what we should look at is whether there are any improvements after dealing with China for the people there, and the answer is yes.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Flowers, In ranking of the world foreign aid, China does not even rank in the top ten. So the donation they do in Africa has little credibilty in what you say. Chinese goverment controls their media, such as CCTV, and they will have hard time establishing credibility as objective news sourece. Westerners does not trust media that are controlled by Chinese goverment. The CCTV was telling the world that what Japan was complaining of radar locking was just a "machine gun", as reported by many of their newscasters and goverment. We know later, what came out of this. As long as the Chinese media remain weak, China will continue to face Western media's biased reporting about China and Chinese international businesses will suffer from such biased media reports. China needs more effort to strengthen its media's credibility and communication capacity. However, there will be difficulties for China in trying to integrate itself with the Western media community.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Tiger_In_The_HermitageMar. 25, 2013 - 01:06PM JST @OsscanAmerica, Just answer this: Why is Guam (in the middle of the Pacific) a territory of the USA? Their people are oppressed and >like Okinawa have to house a lot of US military.

Don't think this is OFF TOPIC?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

sfjp330, think of it this way, where would the bulk of the foreign aid go to? Of course, they are in the pockets of the corrupt politicians. For 50 years so much foreign aid has been pouring into Africa but we couldn’t even see much improvement there. Or, you may be suggesting that China should be like Japan giving out various forms of donations and gifts to strengthen its position in a number of countries, such as free patrol ships and forgiven loans, which means there is always a string attached. Also, you have to remember that China has just got its wealth in a very short period of time, and you shouldn’t expect China to leap frog in its foreign aid to the top-ten list. In time you will see China moving up the rank. On the subject of the media, you will also see China loosening up in that area. As the society matures to the level that people cannot be easily misled by the media, then you will see more freedom of the press in China. As you pointed out and I agree even Western and Japanese media come up with news stories that are so biased even journalist integrity and professionalism have come into question. So, I don’t think there will be a full integration of Sino media and Western media any time soon, but there will be more piece-meal adoption of each other’s news.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@ Tony Ew:

You're talking out both sides of your mouth. For instance, "Japan must quit challenging post-war arrangements," yet China is challenging the post-war arrangement that placed the Senkakus under Japanese control in 1895. Why are you seeing reality only from one side, like a one-eyed blind person. Here's another instance, "The days when Japan could impose settlements on its disadvantaged neighbors are gone forever." Isn't this what China is doing to the Philippines and Viet Nam and so many other small neighbors and still trying to do to Japan?

Then, you talk about "China's overtaking one economic power after another in the new century" as if you had accomplished anything more than working 10 times the population of Japan (meaning, it takes 10 Chinese working as hard as they can to equal one Japanese within each country's GDP). And even then, China barely eked out second place. And you dare think that your productive capacity per capita can ever equal that of the United States in this century? Based on our GDP per capita and China's low-level second place GDP (especially now that China has succumbed to the "middle-income trap), it is revealed that one American worker is equal to 32 Chinese workers and likely to be worth 60 within the next decade.

Now, imagine us in WAR. There is no more PRC. WIPED FROM THE MAP! Welcome to the community of nations our dear and happy Tibet, Xinjiang and Inner Mongolia. The rest of that previous mess called the PRC is just so much mud under our hobnailed boots.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Actually, to tell the truth, Chinese people are not easy to forget the blood feul between Japan.

Do remember this.

The only key to this is "Be good do not enrage China from now on".

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

lachance, sorry Tony Ew but I couldn’t resist from responding to lachance’s comment. Firstly, China has never challenged the post-war arrangement. If you studied the history of the treaties correctly, the Treaty you were referring to that placed the islands under Japanese control was invalid and illegal because China was not a part of it. You have to refer to the Cairo and Potsdam Declarations which have all the parties involved as signatories. In short, the Declarations specified which territories should belong to Japan and that meant the islands were to be reverted back to China. That is why China has consistently mentioned about the Declarations to remind the world that Japan has to comply with the post-war order. China has always treated all the countries equally whether they are big or small, rich or poor. You may know that The Philippines, Vietnam and Japan all had started and intensified the issues and provoked China first, China only reacted to the situations at hand. If you read the news you would know that Japan has been giving free gifts and low interest loans to The Philippines and Vietnam to get them on board to defame China. Talking about the economic power, it is not the size of the population that matters, it is the speed that China has jumped from being so poor about 40 years ago to be one of the richest in the world now. China has the highest foreign reserves in the world and being one of the largest lenders to the US. You were talking about “middle-income trap” depicting China as having a problem, but shouldn’t China be proud of that problem? Remember that China started out with nothing only a few decades ago. The western economists called the growth of Chinese economy as “unprecedented” in the history of the world’s economy. Because of the huge population China’s productivity will always be low, but look at it this way, that one American worker you referred to may be out of work soon and those 32 Chinese workers may still be fully employed. It’s the efficiency and effectiveness that counts. It’s the Chinese money that moves the sluggish world economy right now. Your mentality about war seems to reflect the US with the superiority complex. I guess the American dream is “war and more war,” but the Chinese dream is “peace and prosperity”. So, which is better?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

flowers Mar. 29, 2013 - 02:47AM JST You were talking about “middle-income trap” depicting China as having a problem, but shouldn’t China be proud of that problem? Remember that China started out with nothing only a few decades ago. The western economists called the growth of Chinese economy as “unprecedented” in the history of the world’s economy.

Flowers would be proud of the all the pollutions and the goverment isn't doing much curb the problem. Maybe corruption is behind the continue increase in water and air pollutions? At the expense of what? Sure, after the 30-40 years rapid industrialization, reliance on coal power, explosive growth in cars, it remains one of the most polluted country in the world. China is sure proud of the pollutions. Do you want to drink the water or breathe in Beijing? You notice majority of Chinese citizens discontent over the country's worsening air and water pollution problem and the Chinese government's lack of transparency and progress about environmental concern? Why don't China adopt California gas standard, or heavily fine or close business that continue to pollute? Why don't big cities in China plant more trees?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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